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-   -   Opinions on Roberts 370? (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/40877-opinions-roberts-370-a.html)

barold 02-25-2008 03:03 PM

Opinions on Roberts 370?
 
I've seen the one post discussion other Roberts design boats, but I was curious if people had any opinions on the 370 design. Also I would like to lean on your wise advice regarding a relatively newish kit-built (already built) vs much older manufactured hull at a similar price. Pros and Cons anyone?

Thanks in advance.

Valiente 02-25-2008 08:06 PM

There's a 37? I know the 38. Is it steel?

Ilenart 02-26-2008 03:34 AM

Barold,

I am not familiar with the Roberts 370. In Oz the Roberts 38 is a lot more common, often called the Offshore. Take it you have seen this website? (goto "Sailboat Plans" then "Sailboats from 30 to 40ft" then click on "Roberts 370" and there is some pretty pictures)

http://www.bruceroberts.com.au/

In the newish built compared to the older model one issue is the quality of the build. The vast majority of Roberts are amateur built and they can range from very good to bloody awful. I would get details of the original builder and try to assess their experience / reputation. A good surveyor would be the way to go.

artbyjody 02-26-2008 03:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ilenart (Post 272053)
Barold,

I am not familiar with the Roberts 370. In Oz the Roberts 38 is a lot more common, often called the Offshore. Take it you have seen this website? (goto "Sailboat Plans" then "Sailboats from 30 to 40ft" then click on "Roberts 370" and there is some pretty pictures)

http://www.bruceroberts.com.au/

In the newish built compared to the older model one issue is the quality of the build. The vast majority of Roberts are amateur built and they can range from very good to bloody awful. I would get details of the original builder and try to assess their experience / reputation. A good surveyor would be the way to go.

What "I" said - ..

Jeff_H 02-26-2008 02:05 PM

Like most of Robert's more modern designs, the 370c represents a mediocre design (meaning not the best and certainly not the worst) from the 1970's, which is to say that its hull form and rig are heavily influenced by the IOR racing rule that was popular during this era. This was not one of the better design periods in the history of yacht design and frankly we have learned an enormous amount about motion comfort, seaworthiness, ease of handling, and performance and none of those lessons have been considered in this design.

Building a boat is a massive undertaking and I cannot emphasize the importance of sellecting the best possible design that you possibly can. Having been around a number of boat building projects, you will spend years of your life, and for most people, spend more money than you would spend if you went out and bought a couple year old equal quality production boat. When you are done, the effort is only worth it if you end up with the best possible boat that you can. Otherwise, why bother to build.

When I look at the 370, there are a number of freakish versions that make no sense if sailing ability is important to you. All of the versions are absurdly heavy which is anything but a good thing, especially if you are building this yourself because that means that every bit of the boat gets heavier and more expensive, with no real gain in strength, seaworthiness, motion comfort, ease of handling or performance.

With all due respect, I would suggest that contrast the Roberts 370 with the work of Dudley Dix, or Yves Tanton, both of whom have produced better designs. My other suggestion is to look for a 10 or 15 year old boat that started life as an above average quality design and build quality and that is in healthy condition and customize it to suit your needs. You will end up saving a lot of time and money in the long run.

Respectfully,
Jeff

barold 02-27-2008 03:13 PM

I appreciate the feedback -- I have read up on the Roberts website on the 370, but came here for some opinions from more 'experienced' with less incentive to fawn over the design...

Like I said in my above post, I am considering a relatively recently built (11 years) Roberts 370 which is priced in the same ball park as a ship much older. The 370 had a survey done in 2003 that listed the hull as in 'better than average' condition - the interior is pretty sparse and utilitarian, though that is not really my concern, which I thought might contribute to the lower value.

Obviously, I am not that familiar with yacht design, so I should probably go educate myself before progressing - any book recommendations? (I'll search the forums right after I post this, so if I'm replicating, I apologize in advance.

Ilenart 02-28-2008 06:23 AM

Book Recommendations
 
The recommended reading link below would be a good place to start.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/genera...d-reading.html

There are quite a few design books around, though they often get pretty technical. Understanding Boat Design by Ted Brewer gives a good basic introduction. Desirable and Undesirable Characteristics of Offshore Yachts, edited by John Rousmaniere is excellent.

Some sailing handbooks often get into design issues. The Voyager's Handbook by Beth Leonard has an excellent chapter on boat selection. Heavy Weather Sailing by A Cole / P Bruce (I have the 5th ed) has three chapters on design.

Lastly I would just prowl around some of the old postings on this website. Lots of excellent info here.

Valiente 02-28-2008 08:09 PM

Ilenart's list is nearly identical to mine, if that means anything. And I see he owns a Roberts.


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