Looking for a small cruiser, easy to single-hand sail - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > General Interest Forums > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 04-04-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I would recommend getting a trailerable boat, if you want to have the flexibility to sail in several different lakes...or take it up to the Great Lakes. However, I would recommend keeping the boat in a slip, at a marina, since you'll sail the boat a lot more often if you don't have to launch and re-rig the boat each time. Launching, re-rigging and de-rigging and putting the boat on a trailer can take up to two hours or more. It makes going out for an afternoon sail too much work...
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 04-04-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Medford, Oregon
Posts: 163
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
Andyman is on a distinguished road
A decent Aquarius 23 can be found for under $5K and that'll get you a trailer as well. many are bought for way less than that and...they have a good following. Easy to trailer and two people can easily raise the mast and be ready to sail in about an hour. They can very easily be singlehanded and are very stable to sail.

Andy
'72 A23
Medford, OR
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 04-04-2008
SailorMitch's Avatar
Senior Moment
 
Join Date: Nov 2005
Location: MD
Posts: 1,931
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
SailorMitch will become famous soon enough
Pearson 27 would be a great choice. I owned one for 14 years here on the Chesapeake. Solid boat, handles well, easy to single-hand. Good couples boat also, and within your price range.

Personally, I'd avoid a trailerable boat unless you have a specific desire to haul it around and sail on a bunch of different lakes. They have their uses, but that's not a criterion you mentioned at the beginning.
__________________
SailorMitch
Sailing winged keels since 1989.
1.20.09 Bush's last day the end of an error !! Hopefully we still have a constitution and economy left by then.


"Compassion and tolerance are not a sign of weakness, but a sign of strength." The Dalai Lama


good planets are hard to find-- a song by steve forbert


I have but one lamp by which my feet are guided, and that is the lamp of experience. I know no way of judging the future but by the past.-- Patrick Henry.

Last edited by SailorMitch; 04-04-2008 at 10:09 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 04-04-2008
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Posts: 87
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 7
mjrogers is on a distinguished road
I have a Catalina 22 which I like very much. My brother has a West Wight Potter whigh he likes very much. Either would be good choices, but I would suggest you spend some time aboard your prospects. Using the head on pocket cruisers can be a problem, particularly if you make overnight passages or anchor out. On both of the above mentioned boats the head is very cramped. The galley arrangements are also awkward. I also have a Hunter 25 which is very comfortable but doesn't handle well as the smaller boats, and I wouldn't want to be on it in any kind of nasty weather.

I have been on friends' Paceship 23, C&C 25, Catalina 25 and they were much more usable. This is at the price of a larger heavier boat which is a consideration if you plan to trailer.

I presume from your user name you are in Cincinatti. If so,have you looked at Strictly Sail? They have a bunch of used and new boats you could look at. You can google or yahoo them.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 04-04-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Ohio
Posts: 18
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
BRCincy is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the tips so far. Please, keep them coming, I am finding them extremely helpful.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 04-04-2008
Moonfish's Avatar
Cruiser/Lats and Atts TV
 
Join Date: Feb 2003
Location: Friday Harbor, WA
Posts: 372
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 12
Moonfish is on a distinguished road
Yankee made a 24' trailerable full keel pocket cruiser in the '70s. Good looking little boat with decent accommodations, though headroom is definitely under 6 feet. I've been aboard one and was fairly impressed, given the then asking price of $7,000 - w/trailer.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
"Always approach the dock at the speed you wish to hit it."
s/v VENUS
1978 North Sea 33 Pilothouse Cutter (Ta Chiao)

Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 04-04-2008
DrB DrB is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: New England
Posts: 953
Thanks: 0
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
Rep Power: 8
DrB will become famous soon enough
Catalina 22

My dad had a Catalina 22 many years ago (1990 ish) and he liked it and sailed it by himself easily. I was on it a few times and it was pretty easy to sail and could sleep 4 (cozy), but it didn't have any type of cooking area or head. It has room for a portapot, but really no privacy.

I also agree with others that you should get a trailerable boat, but get one that is slightly bigger, such as a Catalina 25. Unlike the 22, The 25 is also trailerable but has a small food pre/cook area and a more private built in head. If you plan to do overnights, you need a head and a place to at least boil water. The 25 is also three feet longer than the 22 which is huge in that size range, you will notice it as far as comfort as the boat will also be beamier. A 25 is still well within your budget.

Also, as others have mentioned, try to get a spot at your favor lake/sailing area and leave it there for the season or at least extened periods. Stepping and unstepping the mast everytime your want to go sailing is a PITA and you will tire of it quickly. Doing it few times a year is okay.

Good luck in your search.

DrB
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 04-05-2008
BarryL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: Long Island, NY
Posts: 1,540
Thanks: 3
Thanked 17 Times in 16 Posts
Rep Power: 11
BarryL is on a distinguished road
Hello,

You should decide if you want a trailerable boat or not.
There are many benefits and disadvantages of trailerable boats.

Some advantages are:
-You don't have to pay anyone to launch, haul, etc.
-The ability to sail in many different areas (lakes, bays, etc.)
-You can bring the boat home to work on it.

Disadvantages:
-It takes time, effort, and skill to rig, launch, and recover a boat. My first boat was a Catalina 22. It took about an hour from the time we got to the marina until the boat was floating. Same thing on the other side.
-Most (all?) trailerable boats are compromises when it comes to sailing ability. For example, the Catalina 22 has a swing keel. That makes it easy to get on / off the trailer, but the swing keel requires maintenance, and can make noise. Other trailerable boats use water ballast, which must be added / drained, etc.

If you don't have a place to keep the boat, trailerables can be great. If you want a bigger boat (IMHO 25' is about the biggest boat you can reasonable trailer) trailerables aren't for you.

I trailered be Catalina for the first year. And I started to hate it. The second year I got a mooring, so I launched the boat in the spring, and didn't haul it until August (when I sold it because I bought a bigger boat). The mooring made sailing much more fun.

Good luck,
Barry

Good luck,
Barry
__________________
Barry Lenoble
Day To Remember, 1986 O'day 35 For Sale
Deep Blue C, 2002 C&C 110 For Sail
Mt. Sinai, NY

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 04-05-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 8 Times in 8 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Barry-

25' may be the largest manageable trailerable for a monohull..but there are certainly multihulls larger than that are trailerable. IIRC, the Seaward 32RS is a trailerable monohull with a lifting keel that is a bit bigger than that.

The best of both worlds is to have a slip or mooring for the season and to have the boat on the trailer for the rest of the year.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 04-06-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2007
Location: Deale, MD
Posts: 15
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
blakew1 is on a distinguished road
Check out the Com-Pac 27. It may cost just a little more than $22,000 but it's worth it. The boat is easy to single hand and has a ton of room for for 27'.
They look nice and sail well, not fast , but sturdy and comfy. The downside is the boat isn't designed to be a trailer sailor.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Bluewater defined? dch Learning to Sail 44 07-29-2009 07:20 PM
What makes a good family cruiser boat? tziehm herSailNet 16 08-04-2006 06:45 PM
St. Maartin, St. Barts & Anguilla bbayer4230 Chartering 2 04-23-2006 06:04 PM
Small Boat Cruising David Schaefer Cruising Articles 0 06-09-2004 08:00 PM
the perfect 20'' cruising boat? jbarros Boat Review and Purchase Forum 14 04-18-2004 06:45 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:49 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012