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  #21  
Old 04-06-2008
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You all have great suggestions and have given me allot to research and think about. More comments certainly are very welcome. Trailerable boats are not necessarily a criteria here, since it would be my intention to leave the boat at a slip or mooring most of the time. Perhaps that may generate a few more ideas from folks.
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  #22  
Old 04-06-2008
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Get yourself a copy of Daniel Spurr's - Your First Sailboat : How to Find and Sail the Right Boat for You. It is filled with very helpful information for first time buyers, it is an easy read and and a good resource even after you buy your boat.

I would agree to buy as large a boat as you can afford, but keep in mind that as the length increases, so do the costs. I have a 28 foot Sabre MK2 that my wife and I sail and we love it. it is very comfortable for the two of us to spend the weekend on and large enough to bring our two daughters if we want to squeeze together.

You can search YachtWorld.com and see lot's of photos and a good range of prices.

Good hunting
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  #23  
Old 04-06-2008
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What defines a Pocket Cruiser

One man's pocket cruiser is another's mega yacht. I have a 27' Catalina that is perfect for weekends and short trips for my wife and I. A good friend once told me, "6 for drinks, 4 for an afternoon and 2 for overnight!" Which about sums up my thoughts as well.
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Sailing on The Central Chesapeake Bay, West River, MD on my Catalina 27, Aelous II with my wife and friends.
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  #24  
Old 04-06-2008
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Boat Features

Hello,

OK, so if you don't need a trailerable, here are some more things for you to consider. If you plan on spending nights (or longer) on board, you may want:

-Standing headroom: Make sure you can stand up when you are in the cabin. Having to crouch to move around gets real old real fast.
-A real marine head: A porta potty may be ok, but you are going to want a private place to use it. A porta potty sitting in the main cabin won't cut it.
-Berth you can stretch out in: You don't need a ton of room, but make sure you can get comfortable in the main berth. You are going to want a decent nights sleep.
-Pressure water: Do you want a boat with pressure water in the galley and head? How about hot water?

After I owned a Catalina 22 for a year I decided that I wanted to try spending a night or two aboard. There are 5 in my family, so the Catalina 22 had to go. I wanted to get a boat with standing head room, real head, hot and cold water, and an A/C electrical system (for use in marinas). While doing my research it seemed like a 27' boat was the smallest that had all those features. I wanted to get a Catalina 30, but ended up with a Newport 28.

There are lots of boats in the 27 - 30 range that would be suitable for you. Catalina, O'day S2, Tartan, Sabre, Newport, Hunter, Islander, C&C, Cal, Pearson, etc are all perfectly fine boats.

Good luck,
Barry
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  #25  
Old 04-07-2008
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I see you are in OHIO thereby regulated by 4 seasons, a trailerable may be more suitable but it would be more suitable if it came with a seasonal slip. As has been pointed out and I can vouch from personal experience, regular trailering can be a major hassle, but seasonal trailering is a reasonable compromise. A boat that can be trailered home for the winter and slipped for the summer is a best of both. I am 6' 210# but can stand and maneuver around in my 26M MacGregor, in fact we (my wife & I) could have sex in the aft berth as it is big enough. it has a porta-pottie but that is in an enclosed head for privacy. I put pressurized water in it for my wife but no hot water yet. I can stretch out in the salon, aft berth or cockpit, no problem. It is our first boat and is ideally suited to the protected seasonal waters of the PNW and can handle a good blow in its stride, in fact the skipper would fail before the boat would. Easy to sail by two or one and easy to maintain not to mention economical. About the only thing wrong with it is image as it gets bashed a lot for being what it isn't. I am starting my 6th season now and have no legitamate complaints other than it is a tad skinny but that makes it trailerable.
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  #26  
Old 07-21-2008
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Cincy,
I think I am in the same boat you are in. (pun intended). Lack of funds. Let me tell you the advice some fine people have given me. I wouldn't buy the biggest boat I could afford. Buy a small boat. Potters and Compacs are what I've looked at more than anything. Both boats have their following. My preferance would be a Potter. No need for a dinghy, although I did read an article by a guy who used a canoe as his dinghy. Pretty neat idea. With a Potter you can sail right up on the beach, almost. The cabin is small but International Marine will put a few things on for you to make it real nice. I talked to them sometime ago and was told they could install a two burner stove for me. I think they could do one with a small stove as well. Warranty is good as well. I would not buy a used boat unless you are very handy. I'm not. I love the look of many of the old boats but I'm sure I would screw up the maintenance somewhere. The bigger the boat, the more that can go wrong with it due to age. Also the bigger the boat the more that can go wrong with it because you'll want more expensive electronic goodys, like a radar. I'm a chicken ****. I doubt I would ever get much away from land unless I was crossing the gulf to the Bahamas. So I doubt I'd need a radar, just good eyes. Take a look at the Potter website, then google West Wight Potter. Many, many people out there will be honest and tell you the good points and bad points of them. I closing, I wouldn't buy a Potter. NOT YET. There are many, many small open boats (12-16 feet) available on many sites that are selling for $500-$1500. This would make for a good entry level boat and allow you to find out if you really want to do the sailing thing. Good luck in your search, and remember, these are not my words but the words of many people who have many years in sailing.
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  #27  
Old 02-28-2009
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I'd say you're waiting too long and spending too much money. A smaller boat costs less to buy, outfit and maintain and it's easier to trailer and you don't have to buy a big truck to pull it. And it can cruise and anchor in places a deeper draft boat will never see. Nothing on your wish list couldn't be done easily on an 18-24' boat you could buy for under $10k. Possibly well under in the current market.

What do you really need out of the boat? If you're trying to re-create the pleasures of home it can get big, complicated and expensive. I need a comfortable place for two in the cockpit, same in the cabin. Sitting. You can stand in the companionway or on deck. A stove, a sink, a head, storage.

Best bet is to find a small boat that someone has already cruised and figured out what it needed. I bought mine used complete with a suite of sails, all sorts of useful covers, hooks, bags, awnings and a even a dinghy and folding bicycle. Stock it with food and a really good small pressure cooker (you need one, and no one will give a good one away with a boat) and go cruising.

I cruise for weeks at a time in a 20' Nimble. Heck, I'm on it right now instead of waiting three years.
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  #28  
Old 03-01-2009
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I can only second what many have said, get the smallest boat that fits the style of sailing you intend to do. The bigger the boat, the bigger the expenses. You can have just as much fun with a smaller boat as with a bigger boat. If you really want, the smaller boat can be equipped and modified to have many of the same features that a bigger boat has, just on a smaller scale. Plus, when its all said and done, you have more to spend on actually sailing.
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  #29  
Old 03-01-2009
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I have a bayfield 25'.You might look at on of them they have great line's. Easy to sail.I would look for the biggest one you could find.I sail on Lake Erie.Witch lake are you going to sail.
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  #30  
Old 03-01-2009
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Sorry about the spelling on last post short fat fingers
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