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danontuba 04-15-2008 03:49 PM

advice on a large modern sailboat
 
Friends,

I am new to sailing and to this forum, and Im humbly asking for advice on purchasing a comfortable, modern sailboat to live aboard. (No, I have not had the chance to read past articles on this forum, but I will begin a search through the archives) Nevertheless, I am curious to post my questions, in case anyone might give some tips and insight.

Im seeking a comfortable boat to live aboard here in Brazil and possibly to spend some time in France as well. "Performance" is not a criteria at the moment, but the most comfort possible (like air conditioning, space, good bathrooms etc) is important to me.

My budget is probably not ideal: 90 to 100 thousand euros (140,000 USD) but it would be interesting to know what the experienced members consider the best cost/benefit in the (used or new) market for that budget level.

Im willing to travel to purchase the boat, so I would like to know which countries may offer the best prices. Here in South America, for example, there seems to be a big difference in prices between Argentina and Brazil, for example.

From what I have seen, boats smaller than 35 feet seem too cramped. The nicest sailboats I have seen so far at some Jeanneaus and Beneteaus (37 to 40 feet), but these are expensive here in Brazil due to high taxes and import duties. Perhaps there is a more efficient market in France?

Well, thanks for any input. Anyone wanting information about Brazil, dont hesitate to ask.

Daniel


Cruisingdad 04-15-2008 04:14 PM

If you are going to sail the boat from Brazil to France, the bene or Jeauneau is the wrong decision in my strong opinion. You need a "bluewater" capable boat. If you are going to ship the boat there via dockwise, it would be fine.

I chose Catalina as a good boat for a liveaboard and long distance coastal cruiser (if that makes sense). THough others have taken my boat across the ponds, it would not be my choice to do so with the many changes that would be necessary. However, I did not buy a "bluewater" because of the many tradeoffs in those types of boats - like the fact that most (esp smaller ones under 40') are quite cramped.

You could purchase the boat from the US. The dollar would play in your favor, I think. Florida has many boats that fit that description. Be cautious as there is a lot of junk too.

If you are determined to sail across the Atlantic, I would buy the bluewater. Tayana was the best choice me and my father came up with. He recently purchased a Tayana Vancouver 42. It would be about in your price range. I remember there being a V-42 also for sale in Guatemala when we were looking. That would be much closer to you. THey are the best compromise between liveaboard comfort, made well, and long distance cruiser that we found in that price range.

Others will have different opinions.

- CD

PS Here is the link. I thought the boat was in Guatemala... and it may have been at the time. It is now in Ecuador. Looks good from pics...

1987 Tayana Vancouver 42 Center Cockpit Boat For Sale

JohnRPollard 04-15-2008 05:16 PM

Hi Daniel,

Welcome to SailNet!:)

May we ask how much sailing experience you have?

Your english is great, but some of the things you said made me wonder if you are new to sailing. In case you are, you might want to think about a smaller sized boat to start out with, on which you can build experience. If you decide to cross oceans eventually, you will need a different boat than a typical "live-aboard" that stresses comfort and volume.

For the size of boat you want, and the budget you have, you will have to purchase a used boat. I will agree with Cruising Dad that you can probably get a very good value in the United States, due to the weak dollar and the slow economy. Florida is full of boats. Good luck to you!

teshannon 04-15-2008 06:33 PM

daniel,
Welcome to Sailnet. I have a Tayana 42 and I echo what CD said. It would be a fine boat for your needs. There are others that would also be suitable and I'm sure others will give their opinions on them but I like the Tayana 42 a lot. Just be careful of the ones with teak decks (any boat with teak decks for that matter). You might also look at the Passports, they are equally fine boats. Whatever you do make sure you get a good rigging, engine and boat survey prior to purchase.

teshannon 04-15-2008 06:35 PM

I forgot to mention in case you have not seen it, but Yachtworld.com is a great place to search. CD's link is probably to there.

buckeyesailor 04-15-2008 06:47 PM

welcome Dan,

Good luck with the search........

blt2ski 04-15-2008 10:26 PM

Last summers ACR had IIRC 15-18 Jeanneaus from 37 on up to 50'ish ft long, not to mention a number of beny's in that range too. Most are also sailed there on there own from France. Some arrive in good shape, others if they hit a hurricane or equal, well all bets are off.

You may want to look in the Caribbean as a lot of these brands are used in the charter trade, and can be had for a reasonable amount of money vs a non chartered boat.

As far as you taking one across the atlantic, i personally would not recomend it, unless you wanted to join the ACR, Atlantic Cruisers Ralley. where a bunch of folks take off at the same time, so you are with in ear shot of a number of folks.


There are plenty of boats able to do what you want.

marty

copacabana 04-16-2008 09:24 AM

Fala Danotuba!
If you're Brazilian you already know this, but here goes ...
You probably won't find a decent bluewater boat in Brazil, and if you do it will cost the earth. I'm not sure I understand your intentions fully. Are you going to live aboard mainly in Brazil with the boat or France? You must know by now that a foreign flagged boat can't remain in Brazil for more than 6 months (or is it now a year the first time? I forget). This means that you're better off buying a Brazilian boat if you plan on spending most of your time in Brazil. The alternative is making bi-annual trips to Uruguay to re-enter the country again for 6 months. Depending on where you live this is a LONG trip and often in very dangerous waters, depending on the time of the year. From your name I take it you're in Ubatuba, right? Remember, you cannot register a used boat in Brazil (ie. change to a Brazilian flag). On the other hand, if you're going to spend most of your time outside Brazil- buy the boat in the US and NOT in Brazil. Boats are a rip-off in Brazil... The Real is strong and the US dollar is pretty weak at the moment. Boats will cost 1/3 of the price in the US (compared to Brazilian prices).

As far as what model to buy- everyone has their preference. There are tons to chose from. I do think you can buy a pretty terrific boat with your budget almost anywhere (except perhaps Brazil!). Outra coisa, as respostas aqui as vezes so meio grosseiras, mas as pessoas geralmente so legais.

As an aside, if anyone wants to sail their boat down to Brazil and sell it to me, just let me know! I haven't been able to find anything here I like! (I'm serious about this!!).

petegingras 04-16-2008 10:08 AM

danontuba,

Stick with Cruisingdad’s logic and advice, too much philosophy sometimes here. What I heard is basically you want to liveaboard. That’s what I heard, and despite what you might think, sailing across any vast expanse of water is not living aboard. These gals and guy here on this board make is sound magical and attainable, it aint. So buy in the Americas and stay near the coast of go Dockwise to move it.

If you’re looking for comfort, Catalina definitely, but the Hunter brand (go ahead you centrist old school sailors bash away) started building comfort into their boats about 18 or 20 years ago. And they’re pretty good at it this century. And they can be lower priced then Catalina (notice I didn’t say cheaper?).

Now go forth and buy, or wait for hurricane season and get a fixer-uper near the upper Caribbean.

copacabana 04-16-2008 10:24 AM

Petegingras, he can't take the US boat back to Brazil, unless it's for short visits.


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