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Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
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  #51  
Old 10-13-2008
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Beneteau 440
 
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RE shipping a boat: Dockwise: The boat 'sinks', you float on, they weld up chocks, pump out water and sail off. It goes all over (Carib, Pacific, med, etc.)

RE Cats: Yup, it we could afford a big cat, that would be a great way to go. But it can be done on any boat. Our broker raised 3 kids on a Westsail 32 and I heard of a family of 4 on a Cal 27.
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  #52  
Old 10-13-2008
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brrabbit is on a distinguished road
the distant boat purchase

A note of caution. I traveled all the way from CA to BVI sure I was going to buy a Fast Passage 39 there. It did have nice gear on it and it sailed like a dream. BUT. Chainplates were pulling out of the bulkheads - badly under engineered. The decks were major wet in the balsa core, and the hull, althrough dry, was cored. Early day style with early day foam. I contacted one of the original people involved at Tollycraft and confirmed this when I got back home. One bump in the night and your hull core is soaking up sea water. No thanks. $2,000 and a week later I had to let her go. Wonderful hull design. Too bad.

Do your homework before flying off to wherever, and start right now thinking solid and stout. Sometimes an old beater needs only cosmetic stuff and is built like a tank. I eventually bought a Fair Weather Mariner 39 in Florida that is fast, built like a brick, and dry through and through. The deck to hull joint is bolted and then completely glassed over. The chainplates are huge and solid.

No matter what you buy you will spend beaucoup bucks re-outfitting it. There are some good boats for sale in Mexico and the Sea of Cortez if you look carefully and repairs are much easier there than many places. Good luck.

Brrabbit
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  #53  
Old 10-13-2008
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I think you will be happier fitting out in the U.S. before taking off --ready suppliers, good transportation and reliable communications, and especially lower hardware prices will all be to your benefit. With a refitted older boat you also need a vigorous sea trial to identify the inevitable bugs.

Sailing down the West Coast can be formidable, But if you aren't willing to take it on, I question your readiness for a serious blue water passage such as crossing the South Pacific. On our trans-Pacific trip in '03 we did not have time to spend a winter in Baja, so we departed Portland in March. With careful attention to the weather, we had no adverse winds but did see up to 30kn of tailwinds and seas up to 15-18'. It was a cold and sometimes rough ride. But we stopped only in Newport, OR and the SF Bay Area for weather, and then went on directly to the Marquesas with a great deal of confidence that we could handle such conditions. And while we never saw seas that big in the South Pacific, we certainly had winds of 30-40 kn on a number of occasions.

The lack of parts and their high prices in French Polynesia will really make your jaw drop.
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  #54  
Old 10-15-2008
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Redline4Life is on a distinguished road
Hey, you should check out October's issue of Pacific Yachting. There's a great article by Martin Clark who went down to the caribbean and bought a boat for 20 grand, did some essential toucxh up and then just cruised. They even made a profit when they sold it. Great article and may add to some ideas!
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  #55  
Old 11-24-2008
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looking for more info on Fast Passage 39 (brrabbit?)

I read in your posting that you had discovered a balsa cored deck in the Tollycraft built FP39, I was wondering if that was true of the Canadian built boats as well, or if you had more information concerning these boats. We have found a couple for sale here in Seattle and they fit all of our needs really well but I have some concerns about the decks - would you mind sharing what you have been able to find out??

Thanx so much!
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  #56  
Old 11-24-2008
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Cadogra—

You'd really be better off posting a new thread regarding your question. I'd also recommend you read the POST in my signature to get the most out of your time on sailnet, as well as get an overview of the forum basics...

Welcome to sailnet.
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  #57  
Old 12-15-2008
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It's funny I was looking for something totally unrelated when I ran across this post. It just so happens that my wife and I did just what you are thinking about. However, we are not doing a round the world trip. We bought a boat in the BVI's and sailed around the Caribbean for three months a year for the past three years. There are many boats for sail that sound like they could fit the bill in the Caribbean. All you need is a focused plan on what you want and what you're willing to do your self. There are many yards with varying trades people with varying skill levels. We've had work done in Tortola, St Martin and St Lucia...the work...well if they are local, need a lot of watching. This is not a slight against the people of the Caribbean but people calling themselves electricians can be anyone from a skilled master to a guy who was electrocuted once. If you are well versed in the repairs and how to do them, supervision of the trades will be a snap. There are a number of good yards and well supplied shops.
We looked at a number of boats on the internet and had two surveyed and bought the best. We ended up paying 50k less than in Vancouver and the sailing was much more simple, 6inch tidal variation and short crossings.
If your worried about buying a boat in the Caribbean look at buying one on the eastern seaboard. During these economic times there are some deals!!!
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  #58  
Old 12-17-2008
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Instant Cruising Takes a Little Longer

Thanks Nicholasgeo.

We've actually dropped the notion of buying a boat in the Caribbean. I still think it would be a sound plan, and my wife liked the idea, she just wouldn't sell the house (wish we did, it's probably dropped 25% in value from its peak).

So instead, we are taking our Catalina 34 down to Mexico for a year. I'm just about to pull the trigger on a bunch of gear and refit items to get ready to go for next summer.

So we are taking the "go with what you got" approach. Which sure beats not going...
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