In-mast furling thoughts? - Page 3 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #21  
Old 05-23-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Posts: 17
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
vsailor is on a distinguished road
I'm in my second summer with a Catalina 310 with in-mast furling. I wasn't looking for it, it was one of the features that came with the boat!

I do approx 75% of my sailing single handed and find it convenient furling and reefing from the cockpit. I actually really like being able to reef the mainsail on the fly!

I'm sure I loose performance, but I just want to go sailing on Lake Ontario and leave my worries behind for a little while!

Would I take it on an extended ocean cruise? Hmmmm, good question.

Val
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #22  
Old 05-23-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Just something to consider. The stitching on the sail could be chafed by where it enters the mast, when sailing with the sail partially furled... and if the stitching damage contributed to the sail blowing out...it would be a serious strike against in-mast furling IMHO.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #23  
Old 05-23-2008
sailortjk1's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Porter, IN
Posts: 4,647
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrB View Post
Because you lose a lot of performance with in-mast furler, Suppose you lose a half to full knot
I agree with a lot of what you say, but that statement I don't believe is accurate. A couple of tenths of a knot or perhaps a half, but not a full knot.

And, now they are making Furling Mains that do have some roach in them with vertical battens.

I am no way saying that they are for everybody,but for general cruising, they are a nice convienience.

Again, I ask the question, to all of the people here that are on the negative side who are knocking them, have you ever sailed on a cruising boat with one? Have you ever experienced sailing one or are you knocking them with out any first hand actual experience?
__________________
Courtney is My Hero

If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most - E.B. White

Last edited by sailortjk1; 05-23-2008 at 09:49 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #24  
Old 05-23-2008
sailortjk1's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Porter, IN
Posts: 4,647
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
Just something to consider. The stitching on the sail could be chafed by where it enters the mast, when sailing with the sail partially furled... and if the stitching damage contributed to the sail blowing out...it would be a serious strike against in-mast furling IMHO.
Well, I figure we got eight years out of her instead of maybe ten.
I don't know??
__________________
Courtney is My Hero

If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most - E.B. White
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #25  
Old 05-23-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I've sailed on boats with them and had to fix them... does that count???
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #26  
Old 05-23-2008
sailortjk1's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: Porter, IN
Posts: 4,647
Thanks: 1
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 10
sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about sailortjk1 has a spectacular aura about
Of course it does, just seems that a lot of the negative comments are coming for people who have never actually tried using one.

All of the cruisers, who sail with them on a regular basis, seem to like the convieniences and ease that they add to their experince.

Some might even say that it gets them more time on the water because of the ease in which it is to actually go sailing. Try flaking a main sail by yourself. It ain't gonna happen.

BTW, are we done yet?
__________________
Courtney is My Hero

If a man is to be obsessed by something, I suppose a boat is as good as anything, perhaps a bit better than most - E.B. White
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #27  
Old 05-23-2008
senatorcongressman's Avatar
Novice
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: DC/MD
Posts: 41
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
senatorcongressman is on a distinguished road
SD and midlife- Thanks for clearing that up. So a headsail properly designed for RF use would be, much or marginally better than a hank-on headsail adapted for RF use? I ask because I've looked at older boats that have been converted to RF and have had the sail modified. One of those was a 25' Catalina with 150% genoa converted to RF.

Extended apologies for veering off topic slightly.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #28  
Old 05-23-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Sencgman-

Yes, IMHO, a sail designed specifically for roller furling will generally be a bit better in terms of performance both reefed and unreefed than a hanked-on sail that was adapted to a roller furling unit.

TJK—

In terms of full disclosure, most of the in-mast furling units I've dealt with were older ones, and the newer ones may be somewhat better and more reliable, less finicky... don't know since I don't own one...nor normally do I sail on boats that have them.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.

Last edited by sailingdog; 05-23-2008 at 10:40 AM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #29  
Old 05-23-2008
Brezzin's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 379
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 8
Brezzin is on a distinguished road
When you talk about wear and tear on a mainsail, I have often wondered if just the act of flaking the sail on the boom contributes to ware and to what degree. We always can't make the perfect flake and if we do were folding on the same spot and the sail ties can be often to tight. That has to breaking threads in the sail. I would venture that rolling furler may in fact be less abusive on the sail than flaking it on the boom. I don't know for sure and only time will tell.
__________________
Dave
s/v "eclipse"
Mystic CT
2007 Hunter 49
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #30  
Old 05-23-2008
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Posts: 563
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 14
sailordave is on a distinguished road
mainsail furling

While I haven't CRUISED w/ a boat so equipped... the Lippincott 30 my club sold last year had a behind the mast vertical furler. I found this beneficial only in that in strong winds (22,23 knots +) it made it easy to reef. I took out a lady friend one blustery day and felt comfortable knowing I could set whatever amount of sail area was appropriate for the conditions (which got worse!) and still maintain control of the boat. I would NOT have taken one of our other boats out on that particular day.

That said, I personally dislike the mast furling for all the reasons stated by previous posters. Weight, looks, efficiency, etc.

This same boat was NOT a fun boat to sail in light air and I'm convinced the reason is the inefficiency of the air flow and reduced sail area.

I don't mind furling headsails but I remain a bit of a traditionalist. Same w/ GPS and autopilot; they have their place but to rely on them 95% of the time means your HEAD and other senses aren't where they need to be.

And if I have to give up sailing one or two times a season b/c my seamanship skills tell me not to take a traditionally reefed boat out... so be it.

Dave, .02 poorer
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Roller Furling Lay Up Tom Wood Gear and Maintenance Articles 0 10-21-2003 08:00 PM
Is one better than the other? gandydancer Gear & Maintenance 7 07-11-2002 06:08 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:30 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.