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  #1  
Old 06-04-2008
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Sea Trial and Survey Results

Hi everybody. Thanks for the great tips for the trial today. The surveyor that I used (Ron Sato, on recommendation) was very thorough and patient. He spent several hours going over everything and found lots of interesting things. One of those was that the owner plumbed the waste cleanout into the manual bilge pump through a "y" valve so you can pump raw sewage into the water of your choice. Oh, and he used what appears to be vacuum cleaner hose to do so. Most everything else came out with good reviews. The diesel motor has an exhaust leak in the elbow between the motor and muffler which needs attention ASAP (CO anybody?). We also discovered that there are 4 new batteries, 2 house, one starting and one for instruments. Nice, except the added two actually rest against an unused through-hull. Need to move those ASAP! The bottom had been neglected and when hydrowashed showed a real need for bottom paint and some blisters. I discussed the blisters with both the surveyor and the repair yard guy and both agreed that with proper measures now (sanding and repair of those blisters needing it, new bottom paint, zincs, etc., for about $2500) and periodic bottom care, they should not be a problem.
After reading quite a bit about blisters here, I was concerned about them. I am going to try attaching a picture of each side of the hull. Let me know what you think. There are probably 20+ on each side, ranging in size from a pencil eraser to a $0.50 coin. All the running rigging needs replacement, even the dock lines. What it boils down to is this is a pretty nice boat in need of TLC to make up for the apparent lack of attention from the current owner. The asking price was $19.9 and I offered $15,000, which was accepted with the provision that they would do no repairs. So I am asking for another $1000 off the price. What do you all think?
BTW, the boat sailed beautifully and the engine started easily and ran strong. All sails are in great shape and it comes with a 110 and 150 genoa.

Thanks for all the past and present input.

montenido
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  #2  
Old 06-04-2008
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Are the blisters osmotic in nature or cosmetic? There's a pretty big difference. If you do buy the boat, haul it, sodablast the bottom, repair the blisters and then BARRIER COAT IT. Then proceed with bottom paint as usual.

IF you buy the boat, when it is out of the water for the sodablasting and such, have a fiberglass guy fill in the unused through hull with a proper fiberglass repair, or do it yourself. Having unnecessary holes in the bottom of your boat is a bad idea IMHO.

How is the standing rigging??

BTW, your photos basically stink... one is too dark to make out much detail, the other is too small.

I'd be curious to see how the batteries are connected. IMHO, you should combine the instruments battery to the house bank, and simplify your wiring setup. It'll also probably make the batteries last longer.

If you use a Blue Sea Dual Circuit Plus battery switch, it will isolate the starting battery from the house bank, and protect the electronics from starting surges/dropouts. You can buy it as a kit with an ACR to allow the battery banks to combine for charging purposes.

Cajun Trading or Riggingonly are good sources for complete running rig replacements.
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Old 06-04-2008
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Great news Monte!

SD, your depth of knowledge continues to be impressive, we should have you hold a 'Sailnet Boat Clinic' one weekend, I'll host it here!
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Old 06-04-2008
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Im in the camp that 99.7 % of blisters are no big deal...the worst part about repairing them is waiting long enough for the hull to dry out...on a job big enough to warrant a peal job like mine it can take up to 6 months..repairing them with moisture trapped in the fibers will just see them return again..

IMHO
20 blisters per side?.. I would not bother with blasting or any fancy stuff...Sail the pants off it all summer and fall...go enjoy your new boat...come winter pull her out to the hard ...tent her over...open them up and sand/grind back to well resin saturaturated solid looking fiberglass material... let them dry out a few months then epoxy and cloth back flush..fair ...barrier coat if you want...apply your bottom paint and go sailing in the spring and all summer...Then pull the boat again the next winter...if you have no new or returned blisters your done until you do..

Last edited by Stillraining; 06-04-2008 at 09:41 PM.
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Old 06-04-2008
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As long as you are comfortable with the costs you will incur to fix the stuff you noted, there's no reason not to go ahead. Good luck!
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Old 06-04-2008
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Hello,

How did you arrive at the $1000 reduction in price? I'm not stating if I think it's too much or too little, just that you should be prepared to justify your request to the broker.

If it were me, I would not accept the boat with the head plumbing like that. I would also not accept the boat until the exhaust is fixed. I don't know if you want to fix them yourself or pay someone to do it. Personally, I don't really care about blisters. If I were in your position, I would get an estimate for the cost of correcting the head plumbing and the exhaust system. That is the price reduction I would seek.

Good luck,
Barry
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Old 06-05-2008
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Re: Blisters and Head Plumbing

Thanks to all for the great comments. Barry, I am very handy when it comes to things mechanical and fiberglass related (don't ask). So, the exhaust and head issues I can handle, as well as the battery setup. I like the idea of glassing in the unused through hull. Don't need any more holes than necessary, right? The blisters seem to be livable for now. I hate to think of putting her on the hard for (gasp) months to dry out the hull. Has anyone heard of any Cats sinking due to bad blistering? I haven't found anything yet myself. As for the reduction in the price, I think I am looking at about $3000 to get the boat ready for fun, so I thought that the absentee owner might foot some of that. Is it fairly standard when buying used to drop that amount of $ to square things away, or is this higher than usual?

Keep the comments coming, please.

montenido
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Last edited by montenido; 06-05-2008 at 12:03 AM. Reason: spelling
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montenido

It dosent always take that long...depending on climate or adding constant heat works...but I would not short change the process was my point..Also depending where you live you might pull out every year anyway...Im going to....on the hard is half the mooring fees too...

Last edited by Stillraining; 06-05-2008 at 12:15 AM.
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Old 06-05-2008
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From the sound of it - its a TLC boat - I would offer with 12,000 and settle for 13.5K as the counter offer.

Rigging replacement: 3-4K easily and that is parts alone.

Re plumbing the head to be Coast guard approved, around $200 in materials not including labor.

Moving batteries - depending on where - that will result in purchasing around $50-$150+ in materials to do it with properly.

You already know the estimate for bottom repair - multiply that by 3 because that will be the final cost.

This is my personal opinion... For your offer price you should get a fair condition boat for that model and year and not a fixer upper...
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Old 06-05-2008
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parts, costs, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by montenido View Post
As for the reduction in the price, I think I am looking at about $3000 to get the boat ready for fun, so I thought that the absentee owner might foot some of that. Is it fairly standard when buying used to drop that amount of $ to square things away, or is this higher than usual?montenido
The amount of $ required to get the boat ready for the new owners standards depends on many thing, mostly on the purchase price. As you can imagine, the higher the purchase price (relative to the price of models of the same brand) the less dollars the new owner has to spend.

I don't recall the year of the boat you are looking at, if it is early to mid 80's, with the bigger, fresh water cooled engine, and the interior is in good condition (cushions recovered or serviceable, etc.) then the price seems reasonable. What did your surveyor report on the price, etc.?

The first 'big boat' I bought, a 1986 Newport 28, required a lot of cleaning and some simple repairs before *I* was happy with it (others may have required a lot more work). I spent about $1000 on a new head, lots of safety gear, new anchor and rode, shore power cord, etc. My current boat, a 1986 O'day 35, was very cheap relative to other O'day 35's (all I could afford), so it required more money for my to get it right. Most of that was because I knew the boat needed a bottom job (about 20 years of old paint, etc), and a new headsail (original 150 was still being used).

If I were you, I would get the price for a yard to correct the head and engine problems. Then, to be fair, I would split it with the current owner. So I would ask for a reduction of 1/2 the yard price. Since you are doing the work yourself, you will come out ahead of the game.

If I were the boat owner, I would not give you anything for the RUNNING rigging. You should have known the condition it was in before making an offer on the boat. I would also not do anything about the battery mounting. I would tell you "if you don't like the battery's I will take the two off the boat".

Lastly, back in 2004 I was looking to buy a Catalina 30. You could not buy anything decent for under $20K, and most were closer to $25. I gave up because almost all the boats in my price range ($15 - 20K) were just junk. I bought my Newport for $15 and was very happy with it.

Good luck,
Barry
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