Interesting Blog on buying and restoring a sailboat - Page 2 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #11  
Old 07-07-2008
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,540
Thanks: 5
Thanked 71 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
I'm with the Hog. Get drunk, get laid and keep dreaming.

The plan is nuts. I'm sorry, but it is. Your list doesn't even include new standing and running rigging. Even for basic coastal you need at least a half way decent rig and a $3000 s__tbox is not gonna have one.

This is 2008. Engineless boat is not an option. Yeah yeah I know, what about the effing bloody Pardeys ? As someone once said...you havn't cruised until you'd had the P's hit on you to tow them into port......or words to that effect. You on the other are not the P's.

Ah bugger it, I'm sick and tired of being a miserable old coot. Buy your boat, patch up the holes, piss in the bucket, go sailing, have fun, try not to drown the kid and in the meantime I'M gunna go out get drunk and try (however futiley) to get laid myself.



ps - has anyone ever managed to sink a Soling ?
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #12  
Old 07-07-2008
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I know of at least two people who have managed to sink a soling...
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
I'm with the Hog. Get drunk, get laid and keep dreaming.

The plan is nuts. I'm sorry, but it is. Your list doesn't even include new standing and running rigging. Even for basic coastal you need at least a half way decent rig and a $3000 s__tbox is not gonna have one.

This is 2008. Engineless boat is not an option. Yeah yeah I know, what about the effing bloody Pardeys ? As someone once said...you havn't cruised until you'd had the P's hit on you to tow them into port......or words to that effect. You on the other are not the P's.

Ah bugger it, I'm sick and tired of being a miserable old coot. Buy your boat, patch up the holes, piss in the bucket, go sailing, have fun, try not to drown the kid and in the meantime I'M gunna go out get drunk and try (however futiley) to get laid myself.



ps - has anyone ever managed to sink a Soling ?
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #13  
Old 07-07-2008
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,540
Thanks: 5
Thanked 71 Times in 66 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
I know of at least two people who have managed to sink a soling...
Wow.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #14  
Old 12-30-2008
engele's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 54
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
engele is an unknown quantity at this point
Solings and thoughts

It's one thing to sink a Soling in a race, and another to sink it on a daysail.

I race Etchells, and take friends and family out on it all the time with no mishaps.

My thoughts on all of this are that you should DO IT. A few years back I lived in a marina on the Gulf for a few weeks with a very interesting group of folks. You will find that there are two types of sailors, those who do things themselves, and those who pay ridiculous amounts of money not to worry about it.

I wish I was in the latter group, but like you my circumstances don't allow for that. In any case, I know of folks who have fixed up old boats and sailed off to Mexico from the Seattle area, which includes going down the West Coast. Not a novice move by any means.

What you WILL find though is that it will cost you more than you ever imagined and take far longer than you thought.

I started a journey like the one you are talking about a few years back, and over time I have gotten more and more picky and the boat has gotten nicer and nicer. I could have purchased a boat in better repair and have been done with it, cheaper and sooner, if I would have known.

It wasn't an option at the time (though it would be now), so I started to dive in. it can be done. As far as "Smoke Technology" it usually isn't all that complex. I've helped wire three or four boats and done other wiring jobs on others. In every case I had capable help. Really I had someone who knew what they were doing telling me what to do. Friends like that can be found though.

Engines likewise are not all that complex if you have the right help. Good advice will save you months of work and re-doing projects. The point is, if you aren't ready to learn a lot of new things, don't get involved, and don't go cruising.

As mentioned above make sure you have strong standing rigging and if nothing else replace your forestay.

We lost a shroud in the bay this year and had our stick crumple into three pieces. No one was hurt, but it taught me a lesson in reality. Have your chainplates checked as well, and don't forget to replace all of the through-hulls.

The boats you are talking about are capable boats, and all of them are small enough that if you are afraid of engine mechanics, you can always throw an outboard on.

Good luck. There really is more jobs than you can imagine, but less than you would think. I can't explain that except to say that you will spend a lot of time on things you never thought of, but find that there are fewer systems than you imagined as well. That's the best I can do. Good Luck,

Last edited by engele; 12-30-2008 at 03:28 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #15  
Old 12-31-2008
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Posts: 2
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
mrcottonsparrot is on a distinguished road
well, does the baby float? well enough for 2 adults to hang on to?
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #16  
Old 01-05-2010
tager's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 991
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
tager is on a distinguished road
Boats sink, babies die. Don't let it stop you from going sailing.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #17  
Old 01-05-2010
bljones's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: South Coast Ontario
Posts: 8,178
Thanks: 32
Thanked 72 Times in 65 Posts
Rep Power: 8
bljones has a spectacular aura about bljones has a spectacular aura about
Wow, tager, I now sympathize with your landlord.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #18  
Old 01-06-2010
mitiempo's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Victoria B.C. Canada
Posts: 7,151
Thanks: 0
Thanked 71 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 8
mitiempo will become famous soon enough mitiempo will become famous soon enough
Mike
I read your blog and found it quite interesting. Ever notice how strange it is that blogs work backwards - you have to start at the bottom and read up to get it in the right order.
You won't get any discouraging comments from me. The Hurley 22 is a solid boat, although a bit small for my taste, as at my age I prefer one a bit larger. My first fiberglass boat was a Westerly 25 twin keel with a Volvo MD1 diesel way back in 1972. She was a solid cruiser and well built as most British boats are. Since then I have owned a 35' twin keel custom design and a 30' Verl ,also British designed & built. I'm doing the same sort of thing you are though at an older age (58) and not hampered with wife and child. My current (last) boat is a 1977 CS27 which I consider at my age the smallest I can comfortably live and cruise on indefinitely. Small 8hp diesel, full headroom, and a bit of comfort for my old age. But size has a lot to do with amenities and comfort but nothing to do with seaworthiness. I do like to put my pants on standing up however. All boats are projects if they are not brand new and even then there are mods to make and things to fix or change. By keeping it simple you are saving dollars for what counts, getting out there and going somewhere. As mentioned, check the seacocks, the rigging, and the basics beyond that. By doing the work yourself you will not only save money but end up knowing the boat better after you're done. The big difference between you and I is that you will be returning to go to med school and my goal is not to come back. Don't listen to the naysayers and work for your dream as I wish I had 30 years ago. I should have kept the Westerly 25 and sailed south then.
Here's a link you might find interesting.
Introduction to the junk-rigged Corribee Mingming The blog of an adventurous Brit and his 21' Coribee.
Good luck and keep us updated.
__________________
Brian
Living aboard in Victoria Harbour
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #19  
Old 01-06-2010
4arch's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 498
Thanks: 1
Thanked 9 Times in 7 Posts
Rep Power: 6
4arch is on a distinguished road
Why is this thread being revived? Until tager posted it was over a year since this thread was active and it's been almost 5 months since mkrautha was active on either sailnet or his blog. It looks like he bought a Hurley 22 in poor condition in August, asked a few questions, and then disappeared. Wonder if he bit off more than he could chew.
__________________
s/v Spindrift
Beneteau Oceanis 400
formerly Lippincott 30
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #20  
Old 01-06-2010
catamount's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Gulf of Maine
Posts: 599
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 13
catamount is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by 4arch View Post
Why is this thread being revived? Until tager posted it was over a year since this thread was active and it's been almost 5 months since mkrautha was active on either sailnet or his blog. It looks like he bought a Hurley 22 in poor condition in August, asked a few questions, and then disappeared. Wonder if he bit off more than he could chew.
My thoughts exactly.

But, gee, don't we all have our own "blog" on buying and restoring a sailboat? (Mine starts here.)
__________________
Peterson 34 GREYHAWK, West Boothbay Harbor, Maine

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
, a new voice for ocean conservation
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:03 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.