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  #1  
Old 07-02-2008
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Interesting Blog on buying and restoring a sailboat

I am shamelessly promoting my blog. I have posted here before, and received valuable insight into the boat selection and boat buying process over the last two years. Since joining I have gotten a considerable amount of experience on the water, and off (reading, talking, researching). We are still looking for the right boat and right life-strategy for cruising. We are slowly making progress toward that end. Anyway, take a look and leave me a comment to let me know what you think.

The perfect sailboat project: A bluewater fixer-upper for coastal cruising and beyond
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Old 07-02-2008
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cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough cardiacpaul is a jewel in the rough
was going to leave a comment here, but....

While I admire the dream and the plan, I'm wondering a bit about you choice of boats. Some of them are blue water capable, many are not, and none would be without extensive repair (read costly and time consuming) given the boat bucks you have.

All of them are wonderful, don't get me wrong, but on your budget, the repairlist and cash needed for ANY boat of that type will shake, shock and awe you into submission and possible flaming of your dream.

I'm not trying to pee in your post toasties. really. but you're not the first with the same type of dream.

I'm here to tell ya, that unless you're SKILLED in FRP repair, epoxy, rigging, engine mechanicals, not to mention woodworking, glazing, plumbing (bucket is not really an option, don't go there) & electrical to start, this will be a futile effort. You think med school is hard? Diagnose why flipping on the anchor light just caused your battery to become a vicim of smoke technology. (it worked till I saw the smoke)

I'm not talking about reading a book and following pages. You need to be able to actually lay up 'glass a couple of times to do it (notice I didn't say "do it good" ).

Might I suggest that instead of looking for a hole that holds water (and thats what you'll get based on your budget and boat choices) that you take a moment to consider one of the thousands of "sailable right now" production boats.

Examples, Catalina, Cherubini designed Hunters, & O'Days, just to mention a few.

Many of these can be bought for 5K to 7K and you can sail them away today , WITHOUT having to replace a motor & sails today & not have to worry if the mast is going to fall over on you.

None of the above is bluewater capable. Yes, people have done it. blah, blah, blah. I'm not going to, and I'd wonder about the sanity of your spouse if she's going along with that plan on any of those boats.

They can be nice coastal cruisers. But then again, I wouldn't trust a rebuilt boat by someone with no experience on anything larger than a farm pond anyway.

I think you'll find that even if you DO continue on your plan, within a couple of years you'll be suffering from "threefootitus" and looking for a more suitable watercraft anyway.

Paul
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  #3  
Old 07-02-2008
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A lot of the boats on his list, like the Alberg 30, Pearson Triton or Ariel, etc could be bought for about the same $5000-7000 that the Catalina or Hunters could be, but would be far more suitable for going offshore IMHO.

Another boat to add to your list is the Southern Cross 28 or 31. Both of these have made circumnavigations. Donna Lange recently completed one in her SC28, Inspired Insanity. One SC28, in very good condition and rigged for bluewater voyaging, sold for about $18,000.

If you're planning on taking your partner and child, I'd recommend going on the larger end of the list you're looking at.
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Old 07-02-2008
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boats

Hi Mike,

Wow. Interesting blog. I wish you the best.

I have no desires to live on a boat or sail over the horizon. I love sailing and am very passionate about it, but I have no dreams of doing it continuously, especially with a family. I love sailing for a day, a weekend, or a week, but no longer.

Anyway, while I'm sure it could be done, I can't image anyone, especially a family, who would want to be on a boat without a working head, battery powered lights, working engine, etc. I like my creature comforts.

You didn't ask, but my advice to you would be to buy a small cheap readily available boat in average to poor condition. Buy it now, sail it now, fix it up over time. In a year or two or three you will have a much better idea of what you really want. Your skills at boat repair and sailing will be greater. You'll most likely get your money back on the first boat (but not your time).

Good luck,
Barry
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Old 07-02-2008
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Mike...nice job on the blog. I think you are freakin nuts (in a very nice way!) and will regret the time and $$ you are gonna waste with this approach down the road...but hey..it is your road to travel. Just try not to push the limits with the baby on board.
BTW...med school is about a $250k proposition these days. If ya can't afford a sailboat in decent condition...how are you gonna do that in a few years after you've depleted your resources sailing? Suggest you take the boards while science is fresh in your head just to see whether you can qualify...it ain't gonna be easier in 4 years!
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I would urge you to focus on 1.) getting drunk and 2.) getting laid. Sounds like you've had some success with #2, since you have a kid. However, the general tone of your blog suggests that you haven't been focusing on #1. Hunker down, get #1 taken care of. In the meantime, you might want to think of a way to slip out of your relationship with your significant other before the kid gets too old and the old lady starts hounding your butt for $$. Get a boat, scrape the name off the transom, and make a run for it while you still can. Just a suggestion.
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Old 07-02-2008
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Saildog I concur.
However, to be serious for a second or two.

Mkrutha, follow your dream & Just Do It.

My advice on paying for the dream comes from having just read ‘The confessions of a Tenerife Barman” by Joe Crawley. This guy lived the dream and wrote a book about it.

Nice, easy, fun read. So live your dream, write a book on how you accomplished your dream. I think the market for this type of book is Huge as more than likely a large percentage of sailors dream ‘your dream’.
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You agreeing with me or SailHOG???
Quote:
Originally Posted by h16Sailor View Post
Saildog I concur.
However, to be serious for a second or two.

Mkrutha, follow your dream & Just Do It.

My advice on paying for the dream comes from having just read ‘The confessions of a Tenerife Barman” by Joe Crawley. This guy lived the dream and wrote a book about it.

Nice, easy, fun read. So live your dream, write a book on how you accomplished your dream. I think the market for this type of book is Huge as more than likely a large percentage of sailors dream ‘your dream’.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
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Old 07-06-2008
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Thanks for the

good advice, encouragement and good humor. Today we went out on Lake Champlain in a Soling that we rent locally. Wind 5-7 knots gusting to 10. All the sun we could want. The baby was happy as a clam.
Keep reading the blog if it interests you...
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Old 07-06-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mkrautha View Post
good advice, encouragement and good humor. Today we went out on Lake Champlain in a Soling that we rent locally. Wind 5-7 knots gusting to 10. All the sun we could want. The baby was happy as a clam.
Keep reading the blog if it interests you...
Maybe its just me, but isn't it a little risky taking a baby on a Soling...what's the plan if that daysiler were to get swamped and sink?
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