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-   -   Need Advice on buying a used boat (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/46546-need-advice-buying-used-boat.html)

kmansails 08-29-2008 02:37 PM

Need Advice on buying a used boat
 
I am looking to buy a 26-30 ft used sailboat no older than 1985 unless it has been refurbished. Any advice on the best manufactures for a family cruiser with a little speed. We will mainly be doing day trips or weekend jobs in LI Sound, but may end up doing a week plus on the open sea. I know Hunter, Catalina, Pearson and O'Day, but wanted to get some feedback on what people preferred. I like a rummy cabin (family of 4 plus friends), relatively easy to work, but fun to sail. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

BarryL 08-29-2008 05:53 PM

Boats
 
Hello,

You have lots and lots of boats to pick from. Manufacturers include the boats you mentioned plus Newport, Tartan, Sabre, S2, C&C, Ericsson, Beneteau, Jeanneau, and a few others.

Just about any basic coastal - cruiser would be OK.

Some things to think bout including your primary use. For just daysailing, smaller is better. For overnight trips, bigger is better. Think about features you want, like tiller vs wheel, inboard engine vs outboard engine, real marine head vs porta potty, etc.

How did you come with 1985 as your oldest boat? For a boat like a Catalina 30, there isn't much difference between 1980 and 1990. There are 1980 boats in much better condition than 1990 because they have things like new sails, new interior cushions, etc.

Anyway, my first 'big' boat was a 1986 Newport 28. I bought it because it was the smallest boat that my family of 5 could overnight on, and had the big boat features I wanted, like wheel steering, self tailing winches, cabin top traveler, marine galley, marine head, pressure hot and cold water, etc.

Good luck,
Barry

sanjuan2R 08-30-2008 03:26 PM

Whichever brand of boat you purchase, get a reputable surveyor to complete his evaluation on it. Keep with a quality builder although every boat may or may not have been taken care of. Expect to upgrade those items you want on your first boat. That's why you must allocate 25% of your purchase price for maintenance and such.
There are a lot of good boats out there to investigate, but first you would save yourself time if you do some research on the Net & limit your selection to
three brands you like. It makes it easier to compare these three and you will become familiar with their qualities and standard equipment.

Good luck,
sanjuan2R

C&C 27

mikehoyt 09-02-2008 02:31 PM

Kmansails

I have found that most boats have very RUMMY cabins but usually more so at the dock. Dark & dirty is best.

Sorry - I couldn't resist.

Mike

Nut Case
J27 #150

anchorsaweigh 09-02-2008 02:50 PM

Nonsuch. A 26' or 30' is nice. Well equipped, comfortable, capable, deceptively fast.

Cheers,

Bob

Robby Barlow 09-02-2008 04:10 PM

Whatever you do, forget about buying any of these Yankee abominations so praised here on Sailnet, and stick to buying good old German quality. :D :D

kmansails 09-02-2008 04:41 PM

Hey Mikehoyt. Thanks for calling me out on the "rummy" comment. I had a good laugh at myself after reading that one. Guess what was on my mind when I posted the message. Thinking of BVI and some Rum Punch.


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