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dagerman 09-05-2008 11:41 PM

Starting with a clean slate
 
The longer I look for the boat the more I realize that it all boils down to a series of compromises. I think that I have gotten to the point that I know what I want, and am looking for input and recommendations. Here's the short list:

Budget: $50,000-$100,000

Need a boat that I can single hand if necessary, usually it will be crewed by me and my wife. (We sailed a Cal-27 for a few years.) We live in Florida and plan to sail in that area as well as the Bahamas (Now) and eventually the Caribbean and Central America. (15 year plan)

We like to entertain guests, watch sunsets and generally just be on the water. No interest in racing, however, would like to be able to make decent time on a passage. I have no visions of ever crossing the Atlantic, or Pacific but would like a boat that was capable if we decided, way down the road, if we wanted to. I would also like the peace of mind of a boat that could handle the blue waters.

I am leaning towards a centerboard or, if fixed, a maximum of 4'6" draft. Neither of us like the look and feel of the newer boats - Hunter, Ben's, Catalina's, etc. Each time I look around I keep coming back to an Island Packet, Tartan 37C or possibly an Allied - all in the 36-39' range. Realistically, am I looking at two different boats, one for the next 10-15 years and one for extended cruising after retirement or would one of these boats, or others do the job?

Thanks for your input.

RhodesSwiftsure 09-06-2008 03:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dagerman (Post 364161)
The longer I look for the boat the more I realize that it all boils down to a series of compromises.

Budget: $50,000-$100,000

Need a boat that I can single hand if necessary,

I am leaning towards a centerboard or, if fixed, a maximum of 4'6" draft. Neither of us like the look and feel of the newer boats - Hunter, Ben's, Catalina's, etc. Each time I look around I keep coming back to an Island Packet, Tartan 37C or possibly an Allied - all in the 36-39' range.

A used Tartan with a few years on it should be well within or even below your budget. IP's tend to demand more of a premium, but there is no particular rhyme or reason to any of this. The "newer" boats (e.g. Hunter, Benneteau, etc.) might seem less classic, but they still tend to keep the ocean out. They also usually offer huge gains below decks vis-a-vis more "classic" designs.

Find a boat you like the looks of, with a profile you understand and a layout you can live with. Anything under 40 feet with a single mast is a non-issue for single handing (I'm 33' with winches from the early 1960's and no roller furling and I single hand all the time).

blt2ski 09-06-2008 10:25 AM

THere is a 2002? Jeanneau Sun Odysess 37 for sale in LA that just spent the last 5 yrs sailing around the world with its owner. Not what most would describe as a sail anywhere boat. But it did! There are currently 5'ish Jeanneau's along with a few Beneteaus on the ARC world cruise. Granted these are mostly 40' and up, but still what folks would NOT describe as world cruisers brands.

While I do not want to bash Tartan, I do like the brand, at least the newest, than yr 2000 have door openings all the way to the cockpit floor. I personally do not like this options, yes great for ingress egress, but if a following sea hits you, you have way more water in the cabin assuming the doors are open, than ones like Jeanneau's that have the door open to the top of the cockpit seats.

Look for some of these types of items that make a better offshore if you will boat when looking at boats.

Marty

jrd22 09-06-2008 10:45 AM

Look up the Brewer 38(1,2,3,4), it has a 5' draft but would meet all your other req's.

My son has same basic plans as you do and after a lot of looking and research thinks the Brewer looks good.

John

T37Chef 09-06-2008 10:49 AM

$50,000 to $100,000 seems to me to be a pretty big spread for a budget?

$60,000 +- should find you a nice T37C in above average condition. That said, you would likely still need/want to upgrade and replace several things, your left over $'s should take care of that ;)

Of course a good survey, but some specific things to inspect well would be: the cored hull, centerboard, hull to deck joint, rudder post.

We love our boat, but there are many other boats you should look at that may fit your needs better, they may just not look as good ;)

LittleWingCA 09-06-2008 12:12 PM

There are a few 1983, 1984 Hans Christian 33 footers on Yachtworld that meet your price range, blue water capability, and more traditional look. You should also look for Pacific Seacraft Orion 27s, Dana 24s, or the older Mariah 31 sailboats unless you want something in the upper 30+ foot range.

bill352 09-06-2008 03:05 PM

Just for the next 10-15 years in FL and the Bahamas you might want to look at a Gemini catamaran. Lots of room, very shallow draft (1'6" boards up), and an excellent owners support group on Yahoo. There's a 20 yo model for sale right now in St. Augustine for about 40k, and usually a bunch of newer ones in your price range. They have done blue-water cruising, but not everyone agrees that they are fit for it. Still, 15 years is a long time. The shallow draft will expand your cruising grounds, and, while few people in the anchorage will be saying "Look at that gorgeous boat" as you sail in, neither will they be saying, "Look at that gorgeous boat that just went aground."

Just my opinion. I am mono/multi neutral.


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