Tanzer 16 - good first family boat? - SailNet Community

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  #1  
Old 09-12-2008
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Tanzer 16 - good first family boat?

Hi,
I was looking for a first boat that I could learn to sail on take my family on (Wife, 2 boys aged 5 & 3). Of course the family would only come *after* taking a boating safety course and receiving some proper sailing instruction. I grew up on power boats but I can see this is a completely different beast..
After taking out Hobie cat while on vacation a few weeks ago, I feel hooked.. I do understand the Hobie is probably a much faster and more response boat but thatís okÖ
I saw the following listing for a tanzer 16 which I am going to look at this weekend:

Here is the text of the listing (i was not able to post the link)
****
This boat is in excellent condition with two main sails and three gibs. All sails are in good condition. All rigging has been replaced in 2008 and the teak has been refinished. Retractable centerboard and rudder. New sunbrella cover for entire cockpit. Same hull as the Flying Scott. New 2008 2.5 Mercury outboard. The trailer has been rebuilt. All equipment included Coast Guard package, anchor, lines, bumpers, and other equipment. Ready to go sailing nothing to purchase.
****
The person listing it is asking for $2700 but it looks like there would not be too much to put into it

I would be trailering it and using it in bay and harbor areas on Long Island such as Port Jefferson, Stony Brook Harbor and maybe the great south bay and the Long Island Sound.

Would this boat be a good first boat? I was a little concerned about the size..
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Old 09-12-2008
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Tanzers tend to be nicely made. I looked up the picture and specs on the 16and it looks nice.

Same hull as the Flying Scot??...aren't they a 19 footer? Has similar appearance though.

What year is the boat you're looking at? They starting making the 16 in 1963. Old glass can be good glass, but it should be reflected in the price.

In my opinion the price is on the high side. With a $2700 budget, I would think there'd be a lot more you could look at. Definitly check the Tanzer 16 owner's website and find out if there are any problem areas, like leaks around the centerboard, etc. Probably possible to find out a little more about what they sell for.

It is NOT too big a boat to start with. A sixteen is an easy boat to trailer and launch. There's not too much of a mast to deal with each time you rig it.

As much as I love a classic day sailer, the one bummer they all share is lack of a place to pee...other than putting it over the side. Mixed company can make that impractical. Once you leave the launch ramp, your adventures may be limited by the smallest bladder on board, unless you have convenient places to either beach it or tie up.

A boat like a Catalina 22 or an O'Day 20 can be an ideal starter boat, but they're a lot more to haul and setup is more involved than with a 16 footer. Taking it apart after a long hot day with maybe a little sunburn, etc. can sour you on trailering real fast.

Catalina and Hunter have both made 18 footers (approx) that have small cabins that can hold a porta pottie and are small enough to trailer and rig pretty easily.

As you look for a day sailer (no cabin) you really want to throw out a low-ball offer and be prepared to walk away. I can tell you from experience that when you sell one, they can sit for quite awhile and command less money than you'd like. They seem to be both a little hard to find and a little hard to sell.

Bottom line, whatever you start with, you're very likely to sell in a couple years as you either quit or refine your needs and replace with another boat. Price, price, price.
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Old 09-12-2008
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I would think a 16 ft would be a good starter boat but I think it might me a little small for the whole family all at once. If all you plan on doing is day sailing then it should be ok though. As for the price, I'm not an expert but I would say that it would have to be impeccable for me to spend that much on a 16. But then I'm a little on the cheap side anyway. lol
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Old 09-12-2008
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Oh...I just re-read your post and noticed the boys, 5 and 3. Yup, 16' is a bit of a size issue.

If you have a "home base" after you launch it's not too small of a boat. Where I live, you could lauch the boat, and then take the car a quarter of a mile to the park where there's a beach (home base). You're able to sail on and off the beach all day. Kinda the perfect setup for a day sailer.

If once you leave the lauch ramp there's no real handy place to tie up and hang out with the picnic basket, etc. then it can almost feel like you're "stranded" out there on the lake after a short while. Hot sun...I gotta pee...I'm hungry...my tummy feels funny...and so on.

I could see sticking with the day sailer idea, but looking around for the ideal "home base" setup somewhere. IMHO it makes all the difference in enjoyment.
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Old 09-12-2008
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The south shore tends to get really brezzy everyday BUT heckscher state park is a great ramp and then you can go over to the small boat sailing area and beach (it is a bit hard to launch at the small boat area)


I am not sure were you live on the island BUT be aware the ramps that are NOT NY state like heckscher state park are town ONLY


Port jeff harbor is very nice but there is a lot of boat traffic going in and out if you launch there and get back into Conscience Bay you will have much less power boat traffic to deal with
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Last edited by tommays; 09-12-2008 at 03:05 PM.
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Old 09-12-2008
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Location..

Thanks for the replys... I live in Setauket (town of brookhaven) so i would probably use the StonyBrook, and Port Jeff ramps for the north shore and Corey Creek (Bluepoint) for the south shore..
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Old 09-12-2008
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Hi Rob,

I agree with the previous posts. For a 16' boat its nice, but for the family it could be tight on space. Also $2,700 is high. I picked up a 14' Tanzer this summer from a friend and it is a great little boat and a nice learning tool. But with a smaller boat you don't want to be on it for more than a few hours at a time. I sail it with my brother and 2 adults is comfy. The 16' has a bit more room, but not enough. Look around, craigslist is a good one to keep an eye on. For $2,500, you'd be surprised what you can get. I would look for something like a 19 O'day mariner or any O'day around 19 feet. They have a bigger cockpit and some have a decent cabin. Also the 22 Catalinas are everywhere and have better amenities and a place for the wife to use the head!

Here is an 18' O'day, more cockpit not really a cabin but at least somewhere to store your gear.

17' O'Day Day Sailer II sailboat, PRICE JUST REDUCED

Here is the O'day 192 a nice little trailerable boat with accomodations below for 2 and a porta pottie. Asking $4100... but they're out there for less.

19' O'Day Model 192 Sailboat, Trailer& Motor

Happy hunting. Now is the time to grab a boat, as some people just want to be rid of them and not have to store them over the winter.

Keep us posted on any other boats you find!
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Old 09-12-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ippa2 View Post
Also the 22 Catalinas are everywhere and have better amenities and a place for the wife to use the head!
I was gonna suggest something like a Catalina 22 or a J22.

Of course this all depends on your usage. If you're looking for something to weekend on then look for something that would sleep 4 or 5 adults. That makes sure you have enough elbow room it's just you, your wife and the kids.

Also if you don't mind doing a little fixing up you might be able get a good deal on something that's, ahem, less than perfect. Then work on it as a family to fix it up. It also helps you get to know your boat a lot better.
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Old 09-17-2008
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for the area where you will be sailing - i'm across the pond in Fairfield, CT - i would opt for a Tanzer 22. I owned one for a few years and is a great first boat - trailerable - and solid as a rock - especially if you have young kids.
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