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  #11  
Old 01-29-2009
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Being as this post is 5 month old, but none the less, if Robin Lee Graham can get 3/4 of the way around the world in an equal to a Cal 24, and that boat still lived in the Caribbean for another 20 yrs before it was wrecked in a hurricane IIRC, one could probably do pretty good in a boat 30' longer, as long as it was reasonably well built. There are some parts of the design, that one needs to look at and have vs others, anyway. MY 02 that is probably worth .0000000001 these days!

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Old 01-29-2009
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My best friend's father and his buddy actually took a Newport 30 from New York down to the Carolinas and then from the Carolinas to Bermuda and back - Last year I got the oppurtunity to check one out that another friend was looking at and it did not strike me as a boat built for offshore work - had a very light feeling to it - not saying anything was wrong with it but it struck me as a light weight coastal cruiser - just goes to show though that the possibility that anyone can take anyboat anywhere is true- one person can take a Newport 30 to Bermuda and be fine yet someone else has probably taken a 40' plus proven bluewater boat for a coastal cruise and sunk it...a lot more goes into a safe passage then the boat YET if I were going I would make damn sure the boat was up to it!
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Old 01-29-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Saltygirl777 View Post
I have heard of people doing so... and wonder if anyone here has experience with this boat or similar hull designs... I am considering purchasing a 1984 Mark III, but it's offshore performance concerns me...

thanks for your feedback!
With some more experience, and if the weather was ok, absolutely.
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Old 01-29-2009
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Luck can be a big factor in any voyage. Some boats need MORE luck than others.
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Old 02-07-2010
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better get going!

No time to waste, if you recognize rangitoto in the back of my pic you'll see tallwaterII racing into new zealand. Finished my crossing from Oregon to New Zealand last year. Went with two great crew and only experienced faulty rigging from mauri Pro, and a whale strike. still made it safe and sound.
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Old 05-20-2010
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Cool Could? or Would?

The Newport 30 Mk III is a blue water cruiser evidenced by a 70 gal water tank and a 32 gal fuel tank. Most boats that size have about 15 and 8 gallon capacities respectively. Didnt get the boat new, so not sure what the original looked like, but at somepoint the hull/deck joint was reinforced with glass mat. Adequate winches, but crappy deck hardware. Replaced traveler and jib cars immediately with garhauer stuff. Robust mast. My boat was weight for ORR at 8850 lbs. Perhaps boats that were considered lightweight were the Mk I or II.

That being said, the boat has experienced 64 knot winds and several other squalls without so much as a wimper. Got a bloody nose from being run aground on an underground mountain and had to be pulled to repair and fair the front and bottom of the keel. No structural damage, no leak. Latest was a meteorological bomb experienced while crossing lake Mich last fall. 16 foot waves for a day, 8 - 10 for most of the trip. The crew suffered, but the boat was fine. So, the short answer is yes I would take the boat offshore. Long answer is, it would not be as comfortable as an island packet, but it would be more comfortable than a T-10. The boat can do it. The real question is the sailor and how comfortable he wants to be. As for size, it doesnt matter here. Any sailor undertaking an ocean passage should know enough weather tactics to avoid a hurricane. Eighty miles from the center is enough to get to winds around 40 knots, which is considered the minimum safe zone. Hurricanes come with adequate warning to do this. There is no luck. Only knowledge
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Old 05-20-2010
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The Newport 30 is a good design lightly built. I passed on one for that reason. Large tanks do not make an offshore cruiser - solid construction does. Days of pounding will find the weak points, hull/deck join and bulkhead attachment. A good roomy coastal cruiser but not a good choice when one month of sailing offshore is equal to several years of weekend use.
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Old 05-29-2010
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Has anyone ever documented any offshore trips in one? I hear a lot of people trashing them, but I have never heard of one being pounded to pieces during a crossing...

I figure if someone can singlehand a rowboat across the Atlantic... I could take a Newport 30 on a crossing with a little planning.


So, does anyone have a link to a story where someone lost a Newport 30?

Now, Im not saying that the N30 is the ideal offshore choice, but I cant see it being a suicide mission either.
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Old 05-29-2010
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Any reasonably well built boat can be modified for offshore use. But the less well built the boat is to start with the more work required to prep it for safe, comfortable offshore use. A large number of boats not designed for offshore use are built with bulkheads attached without full tabbing to the hull. These hulls will work a bit in rough going and offshore use translates into more wear and tear than the average weekend sailor will experience in many years. Cabinetry that is attached with a handful of screws and bulkheads that are not fully tabbed, companionways that are too wide, weak hull to deck joins and other weaknesses may never become apparent in a boat sailed in protected waters and lighter winds.

The original poster was in an enviable position as he had not yet purchased his boat. If in that position it makes sense to buy a boat with little work required for offshore use rather than buy an unsuitable boat and spend time and money rebuilding it.
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Old 06-02-2010
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I have a 1988 Newport 33 and love the way it handles offshore in New England. Of course off shore to me is really a coastal cruise. I sailed from Block Island to Newport in 10-12 footers on the tail end of a hurricane one year in confused seas and it handled well with wind off the port quarter. I did turn into the wind and sail for about a mile to see how the boat would handle to windward. Once settled in 50 degrees or so off the wind i had little problems. I don't think I would take this around the world but can tell you it handles well and likes a good offshore swell.

Michael in RI
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