Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore? - Page 3 - SailNet Community
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post #21 of 38 Old 06-02-2010
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On the issue of offshore capability; one more data point is that an N-30 was raced from SF to Hawaii in the Pacific Cup. "Water Pik" owned by Bob Nance won the race in 1998 on corrected time. There were modifications to make the boat more robust. IIRC this was in the chainplate bulkhead areas to make them more secure. I'm sure there were other modifications also; as the boat was being raced/pushed for 3k miles.
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post #22 of 38 Old 06-02-2010
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I don't think a Newport 30 is a bad sailing boat, even in rougher weather. Offshore use to me means cruising extensively away from ports and accumulating a decade of wear and tear every year or two. The Newport 30 is not built to withstand this as well as some boats are. Neither would a Catalina 30 be a good choice for this. Both are good sailing boats for daysailing, inshore and for short hops in good weather windows.
Good choices would include Pacific Seacraft's boats, even the Flicka, as well as many others.

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post #23 of 38 Old 02-21-2011
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Yes

The older Newport 30 was built by Elgin National Industries, before they were bought out by Capital Yachts in 1971. Capital Yachts started to produce with more cost saving measures. Before and after, the boats are well built. Elgin marketed towards a more affluent buyer, and they were very expensive boats at the time. "It is easy to build an expensive boat but few people are willing to pay the price." I know of a 1969 Newport that was hit stern by a powerboat in an accident. The Newport sustained only minor damage while the powerboat crumbled. In general, many people would agree that the boats built in the late 1960's to early 1970's were stronger and built better then many of the boats built today. They don't make em like they use to.
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post #24 of 38 Old 02-21-2011
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Yes

The older Newport 30 was built by Elgin National Industries, before they were bought out by Capital Yachts in 1971. Capital Yachts started to produce with more cost saving measures. Before and after, the boats are well built. Elgin marketed towards a more affluent buyer, and they were very expensive boats at the time. "It is easy to build an expensive boat but few people are willing to pay the price." I know of a 1969 Newport that was hit stern by a powerboat in an accident. The Newport sustained only minor damage while the powerboat crumbled. In general, many people would agree that the boats built in the late 1960's to early 1970's were stronger and built better then many of the boats built today. They don't make em like they use to. Great boats, I love my Newport.
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post #25 of 38 Old 10-16-2012
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

I have a 1976 Mk II and it is a great boat for So Cal Catilna etc. I have had it in some mid 20's wind and it did fine but reef early The T pac not me but i could see the boat doing it certainly Cabo and back But like all things plan it
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post #26 of 38 Old 10-16-2012
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

I was a little surprised to see the comments by people that would not hesitate to sail this boat offshore.

We owned, sailed, and lived aboard a Newport 30-II in Southern California for 3 years. While we found it to be a nice, fun, lively, light air boat for that area, once we had moved aboard with all of our belongings, the boat loaded down was an absolute dog that didn't sail worth a darn (in our opinion). Since long-distance cruising would necessitate a heavily loaded boat, you would be starting out at a disadvantage. They were designed to be racer/cruisers, not heavily laden cruising boats.

With that nice wide beam it was definitely a roomy livaboard for a 30 footer though, and we did enjoy living on it.

And it rolled in an anchorage like nothing I'd ever experienced. Something about that big round bathtub shape.

In addition, we did find it to be lightly built. From inside the v-berth you could literally see sunlight faintly shining through the gelcoat and fiberglass.

That being said, it is true that significant ocean passages have been made in a Cal 20, so with a masterful enough skipper and with a boat in sound condition, it can definitely be done. But I personally would not want to do it. For offshore work there are plenty of more suitable boats to be had. Unless someone is giving you the boat, why???
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post #27 of 38 Old 10-16-2012
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

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Originally Posted by oldragbaggers View Post

In addition, we did find it to be lightly built. From inside the v-berth you could literally see sunlight faintly shining through the gelcoat and fiberglass.
While I am not defending the Newport 30 in particular, except for the gelcoat the layup is most often clear resin - it is stronger than pigmented resin and allows the crew to confirm that the roving is wet out thoroughly. I have seen the sun shining through the hull of boats from many different builders including my own CS27. It is not an indication of strength or lack of it.

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post #28 of 38 Old 10-17-2012
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

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While I am not defending the Newport 30 in particular, except for the gelcoat the layup is most often clear resin - it is stronger than pigmented resin and allows the crew to confirm that the roving is wet out thoroughly. I have seen the sun shining through the hull of boats from many different builders including my own CS27. It is not an indication of strength or lack of it.
Point taken. I will just say that out of the 8 sailboats we have owned, it seemed to be one of the more lightly built.

We owned a very sweet Cape Dory 28 that we paid less for than we did the Newport. Much more of a cruising boat, the major downside was the narrow beam gave you much less living space (but was also what made it such a stable and comfortable ride).

I was just pointing out that the Newport, while a nice boat, might not be the most logical choice given that more offshore capable boats can be had within the same budget. (Actually probably less when you figure in the modifications that might be needed to the Newport to make it offshore capable.

I do however have a great deal of respect and admiration for anyone who is out there doing it and making it work and have no desire to judge anyone's choice of boat.

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post #29 of 38 Old 01-21-2013
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

When I think of offshore, I'm thinking of survivability. Is that what you mean, or are you talking about durability over a long period of time. A circumnavigation in which you may want to think twice about a relatively flat bottom or are you just making a dash to the Bahamas or Hawaii where the weather window can be strictly considered and waited out. One side is the durability and if your adventure will be interrupted rudely by a significant repair bill, or if you are truly in an unacceptable rage of danger? So I'm in a quandary if a heavy and deep V hull typical offshore cruiser is necessary in these days of data communications via SSB A kind of turtle and hare comparison. Slow durable hare vs a faster rabbit. We can always fall back on the minimum risk profile, but can the risk be offset by significant improvement in offshore planning and strategy? I don't have the answer and I doubt if anyone else has a factual answer, but I would guess the answer lyes in the skippers judgement skill. I like allot of the characteristics of the Newport 30 III, just need to learn more about them.

Last edited by mclouse; 01-21-2013 at 02:48 AM.
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post #30 of 38 Old 01-21-2013
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Re: Woud YOU take a Newport 30 offshore?

If it has been done before in a similar boat, and you think you have the guts/experience to do the same.. Go ahead...
Make sure the boat is in as good shape as it can get..
Rigging, sails and a sound hull etcetera...

Plan a little ahead..
Have spare parts for essential equipment...
And make sure you have the means to keep the water on the outside of the boat.....
I have read hundreds of posts here during the last few years..
And i must say.....
The majority seems to focus on Comfort.....
Full keel vs fin keel and so on...
Don't know if it is a age thing or what??
(I know i will get some pepper for that one...)
But I am one of those fortunate ones, who has never been seasick...
And i have spent considerable time on medium size boats in open seas...
(30-40 foot)

But you must keep in mind....
Most of these "statements" are in fact opinions.....
So is what I have written above....

I say SAFETY first.....
Liferaft, Ditchbag, Flares and Epirb...
Prepare for the worst..
And hope for the better....

Fair winds....
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