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  #11  
Old 10-16-2008
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
The Compacs are pretty good in that size range, as are the Montgomeries.
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  #12  
Old 10-16-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Delirious View Post
I owned Thistle #1858 and I would not recommend it as a beginner's sailboat for two people.

Heck of a boat, and IMHO the cream-of-the-crop of racing dinghys, but it is like handng the keys to the Ferrari to a first time driver.

I've seen two folks hop off a Thistle coming in fast to a beach and the boom swung back and hit the helms(wo)man in the forehead hard enough to lift her out of the boat from seated. It was the loudest "PING" I've ever heard on a sailboat. Eventually THE ADMIRAL did forgive me & the other crewman, and the lump went away in a week. You'll note it's low to the gunnel.





Things happen fast on a Thistle and you only get one chance to correct them. It's also a cast iron b##ch to set that loose-footed mast every time with the tight solid wire rigging. The Scot is worlds easier whth the hinged base.
Good call. I'm just bias because I want one to play with.
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  #13  
Old 10-16-2008
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There are days I miss ours a bunch. It was a 1964 I saved from a rotted mess. That picture was taken from a Flying Scot as we walked past on a very light air day. That boat moved no matter what - especially with only two aboard. If you could get it moving at all it seemed to generate it's own wind even on flat, dead air days. You're looking at 200 ft^2 of sail on a 500lb hull!

'Course it would take two days for my back to unkink after a day of sailing. Helmsman has nice benches and the "crew" goes from calves on the rail & toes under the strap to getting painfully familiar with the swivel-block on the centerboard trunk.

I'm proud to say we never dumped her. Sailed her under once when we started to ship water over the gunnel but the bilge scuppers drained her and we kept going.

So - back to the original couple. Do they want an open boat, a cuddy or a weekender sytle sleeping cruiser?
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Old 10-16-2008
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Not to highjack the thread, but our situation is similar. We are beginners. too.
There are a bunch of lakes in our state, all within reasonable distance. As much as we'd love a 25 to 30-foot boat, we have to be financially realistic.
As I see it, our parameters include:
* A trailer sailor (that could be towed by a Ford Ranger, 2wd, 3.0 ltr auto trans). 18-22 feet long. Small outboard.
* Daysailing (or evenings) with the capability of weekends aboard capable of allowing us to spend a night aboard with a pair of small dogs. A cabin kitchen, while nice, isn't paramount.

From what I've read, such boats as the Catalina 22, Sanibel 18, Westwight Potter 19, and Precision 18 or 21 would fit the bill. I think the Catalina is the heaviest that I would want to haul behind the Ranger.
I sure there's other models out there (those listed as ones I've read about most) and I'd love to hear people's thoughts.

Thanks in advance!
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  #15  
Old 10-16-2008
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To the OP,
Flying scott. Great little boat.
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  #16  
Old 10-16-2008
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MikeAR View Post
Not to highjack the thread, but our situation is similar. We are beginners. too.
There are a bunch of lakes in our state, all within reasonable distance. As much as we'd love a 25 to 30-foot boat, we have to be financially realistic.
As I see it, our parameters include:
* A trailer sailor (that could be towed by a Ford Ranger, 2wd, 3.0 ltr auto trans). 18-22 feet long. Small outboard.
* Daysailing (or evenings) with the capability of weekends aboard capable of allowing us to spend a night aboard with a pair of small dogs. A cabin kitchen, while nice, isn't paramount.

From what I've read, such boats as the Catalina 22, Sanibel 18, Westwight Potter 19, and Precision 18 or 21 would fit the bill. I think the Catalina is the heaviest that I would want to haul behind the Ranger.
I sure there's other models out there (those listed as ones I've read about most) and I'd love to hear people's thoughts.

Thanks in advance!
Friends of ours had a Precision 21 and it was a very nice sailing boat. The best thing about the Catalina 22 is that they are EVERYWHERE and can be had for little cash. They don't sail bad and are good first boats. One of those little boats you hear folks doing incredible passages in (but then lots of folks parachute off buildings or shoot heroin, too).

IMHO Potters are light and undercanvased. By light I mean you can push the hull by hand and get it to oil-can. They seem to hold up, though.

For a really unique boat see if you can find anything on a Bay Hen 21. It's light, has a goodly amount of room and is a super easy rig to sail (a gaff catboat).
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  #17  
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Absolutely look as S-2s, they are the class act of trailer sailers.

See S2 Sailing Association and S2 6.7, 6.9 & 22 Class Association Boats Page

Most were made with keel/daggerboards which make them very trailerable. Nice designs, well build and fast, they are competitive small racer/cruisers still today. I would think any lake in the Midwest with a fleet of racing boats would have some S-2s to look at. Note the small boat universe has a lot of crappy boats, an S-2 will cost more money than most boats its size, but they are well worth a premium. (For a number of summers I raced a 6.9 on Lake Minny... and loved the boat)
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  #18  
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I don't think they are looking for a cabin boat/cruiser. Just a small sailboat built for 2 with possibility of a few more on special occasions.
Flying Scot sounds good, is there a lighter version?
Thanks,
Ron
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  #19  
Old 10-16-2008
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FScot's a good boat -- 850 lbs isn't that heavy, and it moves okay in a good wind. More stable and forgiving than some boats in that class. Slightly more racy, but still manageable, is the Lightning. It's also sloop-rigged, if that's what they are interested in, 750 lbs, can be sailed by one to five people. Lots of them around at a wide range of prices. The hard chines make it stable for beginners when sailed cautiously; hook your feet under the hiking straps, power up, and it's one wild ride. Among the most enduring designs out there.

I sail a Buccaneer18, which is also common, also cheep, also simple to rig and quite fast. But it is a BEAST of a boat and I cannot recommend it for new sailors unless they are fully willing to swim a little. If they are, and if they can handle the learning curve, it's a stitch at 500 lbs. Best with two to three people. Chop three feet off the transom, reduce sail area, and you have the Mutineer, altogether better-mannered and available for beer money. Not so much fun as the Bucc, tho!

Small catboats are great to learn on, having only one sail. They can often serve as rowboats, too. Other boats to look for: Snipes, Capris, small Hunters, Americans. Most important thing is for your friends to get an inexpensive boat in sail-ready condition, nevermind aesthetics or pedigree. Get out on the thing, flounder helplessly, learn how to make it go. Then learn how to make it go better. After one summer of that, they'll know if sailing is their bag & what they want in a boat. They can sell their first one for the buying price and the story begins.
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  #20  
Old 10-17-2008
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Plenty of good suggestions

I'm partial to the Flying Scot (obviously), which is a great, stable platform to learn on, but plenty of fun to tune and master, too. But the Daysailer, Rhodes 19, the Precisions and the Lightning are also great choices for trailerable, easy to launch and sail boats for a couple and the occasional guest or two.

In answer to the original poster, a "lighter Scot" is arguably the Thistle ... same designer, but different design intention. The Scot is a daysailer that can be raced. The Thistle is a racer that can be daysailed ... by someone who knows what he's doing. They're a blast, but not what I would call comfortable, and they are a handful in a breeze.

Kurt
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