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  #141  
Old 07-18-2010
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A+ thread, glad it was bumped

First off I want to thank all of you for making this forum a wealth of knowledge and even a source of laughter at times. I am deployed to Iraq and what downtime I have is spent reading, learning via online celestial navigation courses and researching everything sailing related I can find.

That said, I have zero real knowledge but consider myself much more aware of what I must learn to master, in part, thanks to all of you fine people.

On to the purpose of this post; Thank You Saildog for this thread; I have read it several times over the past few months and may be utilizing the tips you and everyone else has shared upon my return stateside.

The plan is now to purchase a modest daysailer that needs some work, learn as much as I can, hands on, by restoring her myself; which I had not planned to do for 2 years, after taking some ASA courses and having at least enough experience to confidently say I can at least sail. But then it happened, while looking at listings one jumped out at me and now I am currently "looking" at a 20' sloop modestly priced and have only begun e-mail correspondence with the broker and to be honest, I was very discouraged by his vague responses to very specific questions, which I would not have known to ask, if it wasn't for you all.

I will let you all know how this first step into being a 1st time boat owner turns out, and Thank You again, everyone, for sustaining this great community.

Ben
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  #142  
Old 07-18-2010
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Hey flea - keep us posted on the purchase. And thanks for your service dude. Sailing is way better than eating sand....I'm told.

PS - Your avatar is a classic. Nice work.
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  #143  
Old 08-12-2010
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So many great, welcome tips here. As a newb, these are invaluable to me. This, too, gives a good sense of the comraderie, experience, and intelligence of our members.

One thing that largely seems to be missing in the various forum areas here and on other sailing forums are tips and general info on trailering, such as tow vehicle ratings, great trailerable boats, etc. I did find what appears to be good guidance over on the h260.com site under towning-basics.html. This kind of info seems to almost need its own forum area. But the boatloads of other info here are great and needed, no doubt, by so many shoppers and buyers.
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  #144  
Old 08-13-2010
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I go where I'm towed.

One thing about towing that people might not think about is that the published towing capacity of a vehicle is really only a starting point. A little bit under doesn't mean you're necessarily okay. The trailer being towed, windage, wheelbase and weight distribution of the towing vehicle, tires, brake set-up, terrain and altitude, and weather will all have their say.

In general, you can get away with bumping your limit when moving a tow a few blocks to a boat ramp with moderate slope and good traction whereas you want to have a huge amount of reserve capacity for towing cross-country through mountains, weather, traffic, etc.

Overhead power poles are of course a sinister threat. Trailer tires generally need quite a lot more pressure than car tires, so check frequently. Protect tires from sun damage. And don't forget to be sure to have your hitch ball and coupler match, lock your coupler, and cross your chains. For a big cross-country trip, I could see wisdom in having pre-greased and bagged spare wheel bearings.

We once had a power outage at our lake cabin when someone towed a sailboat away from the lake -- until they encountered their first overhead powerline, which knocked the boat off the trailer.

We once know someone who tried to tow about 7500 lbs. with a 3500 lb. capacity towing vehicle. It sort of worked -- until they got to the first downhill and the trailer decided to pass them. Fortunately, the body damage that resulted was to the Cherokee and not to any people.
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  #145  
Old 08-14-2010
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To add to what Pat has said about trailers—

Tandem axle trailers should have brakes on all axles, not just one. This isn't always the case, and is illegal in many states.

The towing capacity of the vehicle needs to be well above the stated weight of the trailer and boat for any serious towing. I'd also point out that many boat and trailer combinations are far heavier than the manufacturer says.

Checking your trailer and boat against a calibrated truck scale is a good idea.

Weight distributing hitches are a great thing for heavier trailers.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rgscpat View Post
One thing about towing that people might not think about is that the published towing capacity of a vehicle is really only a starting point. A little bit under doesn't mean you're necessarily okay. The trailer being towed, windage, wheelbase and weight distribution of the towing vehicle, tires, brake set-up, terrain and altitude, and weather will all have their say.

In general, you can get away with bumping your limit when moving a tow a few blocks to a boat ramp with moderate slope and good traction whereas you want to have a huge amount of reserve capacity for towing cross-country through mountains, weather, traffic, etc.

Overhead power poles are of course a sinister threat. Trailer tires generally need quite a lot more pressure than car tires, so check frequently. Protect tires from sun damage. And don't forget to be sure to have your hitch ball and coupler match, lock your coupler, and cross your chains. For a big cross-country trip, I could see wisdom in having pre-greased and bagged spare wheel bearings.

We once had a power outage at our lake cabin when someone towed a sailboat away from the lake -- until they encountered their first overhead powerline, which knocked the boat off the trailer.

We once know someone who tried to tow about 7500 lbs. with a 3500 lb. capacity towing vehicle. It sort of worked -- until they got to the first downhill and the trailer decided to pass them. Fortunately, the body damage that resulted was to the Cherokee and not to any people.
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  #146  
Old 09-22-2010
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What is wrong with the word petcock?

Do you feel the word is evil?
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  #147  
Old 09-22-2010
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the censored orifice

The word censoring (pet****) may have been done by a computer somewhere or may have been done by a poster who has "nanny" software on his or her computer. Some of these programs may be so sensitive and devoid of contextual knowledge that they don't allow bird watchers to talk about a titmouse, diesel mechanics to talk about a petcock, or dog breeders to discuss their best bitches. Whereas at the anarchists' website....

To try to get back on topic, how much error is there in an amateur's use of a moisture meter to look at boats, and what are there the limits of how much you can learn with a moisture meter about a boat that is in the water?
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  #148  
Old 09-23-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rgscpat View Post

To try to get back on topic, how much error is there in an amateur's use of a moisture meter to look at boats, and what are there the limits of how much you can learn with a moisture meter about a boat that is in the water?

Error depends primarily on your experience with the meter and knowledge of material (isn't everything?). Someone who just bought whatever meter and went to use it on a first boat likely won't derive any useful information whatsoever. Someone who had used moisture meter consistently (and took time to physically inspect materials he tests) - would probably be as good (or better, as my last survey had shown ) as anyone. It's not magic - but it does require some knowledge and experience.

You can always check the deck of a boat in the water. With cored deck and non-cored hull construction, deck is where moisture meter most useful anyway.

A good moisture meter should also be designed to ignore "surface moisture" and take readings at a small depth (to ignore any mist or run-off), and have atmospheric moisture adjustment (without that you will have different readings of the same surface on humid or dry days). Appropriate equipment is a significant part of success.
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  #149  
Old 11-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lightlyone View Post
One thing that largely seems to be missing in the various forum areas here and on other sailing forums are tips and general info on trailering, such as tow vehicle ratings...
Go to rv.net forums. Lots of info on tow ratings and more for various vehicles.
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  #150  
Old 11-25-2010
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An excellent article saildog, any special tips for steel hull and decks?
Mouldy.
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