Why not a Beneteau? - Page 11 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #101  
Old 02-08-2009
danielgoldberg's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New York
Posts: 679
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 7
danielgoldberg is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by camaraderie View Post
daniel...it is not physics. Physics has THREE dimensions in North Carolina!
We call the 3rd dimension "freeboard" and it can indeed make a more narrow beamed boat roomier (i.e. cubic feet)...especially when the smaller beam is carried aft.
Just thought New York should know about this new discovery!
Touche!

But that said, go find me a narrower boat that has higher freeboard (that isn't a Buccaneer)!
__________________
Dan Goldberg

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #102  
Old 02-10-2009
harryhoratio's Avatar
Ventilation Guy
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Chico, CA
Posts: 36
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
harryhoratio is on a distinguished road
Older Beneteau First 42

Have sailed my 1985 First 42 from Desolation Sound, BC to Zihautanejo, Mexico and would not trade her in for a heavier "blue water" boat ever. Crewed on an Island Packet 45 from Saint Thomas to Norfolk for 12 days and though the boat was solid and roomy and comfortable she was a compete dog sailing. If you feel the need for a little speed or if you love the sensation and "wheel feel" that is sailing to me - then stick with a quality builder with designs that are meant to sail better than most.

Check out the latest Practical Sailor and the article on design - very interesting.
__________________
Craig Alger
Blog: Sailboatsailor.wordpress.com
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #103  
Old 02-10-2009
camaraderie's Avatar
moderate?
 
Join Date: May 2002
Location: East Coast
Posts: 13,877
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3 Times in 3 Posts
Rep Power: 15
camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough camaraderie is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by danielgoldberg View Post
Touche!

But that said, go find me a narrower boat that has higher freeboard (that isn't a Buccaneer)!
MacGregor26x!
__________________
No longer posting. Reach me by PM!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #104  
Old 02-10-2009
Bene505's Avatar
Glad I found Sailnet
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3,633
Thanks: 5
Thanked 40 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Bene505 will become famous soon enough Bene505 will become famous soon enough
He meant a sailboat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #105  
Old 02-10-2009
blt2ski's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 6,729
Thanks: 0
Thanked 21 Times in 20 Posts
Rep Power: 10
blt2ski will become famous soon enough
Reinel or some spelling there of made a boat that might fit the requirements!
__________________
She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #106  
Old 02-10-2009
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,601
Thanks: 5
Thanked 73 Times in 68 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
OK, the Womboat is 34' Steel. Brick Outhouse. Ironically enough however below the water she is fin keel skegless rudder.

Having spoken with a number of designers I am now firmly of the opinion that the skeg issue is a furphy. Many are the skegs that are as useless as can be. A lot of them are simply there for effect and indeed there are cases where skegs have separated from the hull leaving the rudder intact.

My belief is that the rudder construction is what's important and that a well designed and constructed rudder does not need a skeg.

I'd also note that on the two occasions I have had the old girl aground and the one occasion I ran my PB up it was the keel and not the rudder that got walloped. Yes they were all soft nudges onto sand but the point is still valid. Run aground and you hit your keel, not your rudder.

Yes, if you are hard aground and lie the boat over you might have more serious problems but most times , particularly on coral, its a crunch only.

Now, beyond, that.....my search for the new Womboat has been largely in the area of large fin and skeg rudder cruisers of the Valiant (generically speaking) type. This encompasses Valiants, Tayanas, Passports, Noresman and the like. All of these are considered big heavy offshore cruisers but might I also remind you that 20 - 30 years ago many of these boats were frowned up by the traditionalists who considered anything less than a full keel to be undesirable. Early Beneteaus would have been laughed at.

Today, the early Beneteaus are spoken of in terms of 'they don't build them like they used to' . No they don't and in many cases for good reasons.

Earlier this year Wombette and I spent some time on a Benetteau 505. Damn that was a nice boat. Bit big for me but shrink it down a tadge and I'd have one in a shot. That thing has sailed almost the entire east coast of Oz with nary a problem. Her below decks wreaked quality and that garage up front was ginormous.

Thats said I'm not about to go out and buy a Beneteau just yet but we are looking. The issues I see are that the Firsts are probably the best of them but their draft is a problem for us. I can handle six feet but beyond that it is a bit limiting. Ironically when we then have a look at the Oceanus, the forty odd footers are 5'6' ish draft which is getting to the point where uphill performance is going to suffer.

Trouble is you see that too often we are close minded on these matters and really should be more open to different ideas. I am, I admit as guilty as the next man.
__________________
Andrew B

"Do you think God gets stoned? I think so... Look at the platypus." Robin Williams.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #107  
Old 02-12-2009
sab30's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Posts: 240
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
sab30 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by harryhoratio View Post
Have sailed my 1985 First 42 from Desolation Sound, BC to Zihautanejo, Mexico and would not trade her in for a heavier "blue water" boat ever. Crewed on an Island Packet 45 from Saint Thomas to Norfolk for 12 days and though the boat was solid and roomy and comfortable she was a compete dog sailing. If you feel the need for a little speed or if you love the sensation and "wheel feel" that is sailing to me - then stick with a quality builder with designs that are meant to sail better than most.

Check out the latest Practical Sailor and the article on design - very interesting.
The word comfort comes up here and it is one of the important factors for us. Us we shop for our second boat my wife (who can be prone to motion sickness-only 2 recorded fish feeding sessions ) would like comfort to be a priority both at sea and at anchor. Im told a heavier displacement boat provides better comfort at anchor as well. Distance offshore always seems to be the factor in the two camps but what about comfort. Would she be better suited in a heavy comfortable slower boat coastal sailing than the typical "coastal cruiser" ?

Just one of the many items on our checklist but a priority for her.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Sab30
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #108  
Old 02-12-2009
CBinRI's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2004
Posts: 913
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 11
CBinRI is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by harryhoratio View Post
Have sailed my 1985 First 42 from Desolation Sound, BC to Zihautanejo, Mexico and would not trade her in for a heavier "blue water" boat ever. Crewed on an Island Packet 45 from Saint Thomas to Norfolk for 12 days and though the boat was solid and roomy and comfortable she was a compete dog sailing. If you feel the need for a little speed or if you love the sensation and "wheel feel" that is sailing to me - then stick with a quality builder with designs that are meant to sail better than most.

Check out the latest Practical Sailor and the article on design - very interesting.
Agreed. The First 42 is a great boat.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #109  
Old 02-13-2009
OsmundL's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Norway (sometimes)
Posts: 361
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
OsmundL is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by sab30 View Post
Im told a heavier displacement boat provides better comfort at anchor as well.
This is by no means a certain relationship and could be a red herring. Weight is one factor but hull shape is equally important. There are some heavy designs of the "old" style that do indeed behave more calmly, but you should also look at e.g. the transoms. Many newer boats have very wide transoms and a "fine" bough, resulting in a tremendous lift and carrying capacity aft. Compared with a narrow boat, e.g. a canoe stern, they roll less in a following sea and are less "wet" - they are not so quickly pooped. The design is meant to sail them more flat and with less roll. Put bluntly: sailing with less heel is also a comfort factor.

My own boat is great at anchor where it is allowed to swing into the wind, but not at all good tied up in a marina. Even small waves taken sideways will rock her in the marina. There, a heavy round-keeler would be more at home.

The weight factor can work both ways, and few designers add weight just for the sake of comfort. There will be combinations of wave height/length and boat where weight helps a particular boat, and others when the weight exacerbates the roll.

While sailing, remember that weight also affects how quickly a boat can accelerate. An agile boat can pick up speed and "ride" a wave rather than getting buried and trapped in it. I should add "sometimes" - this is also a truth that applies in some conditions, not all.

Important caution: we are after all speaking about sail boats. The chief provider of stability is meant to be the sail, stiffening the boat and counteracting wave movements. When the boat is too heavy, the sails lack power to do their job; on the other hand, if the boat is super light it would overreact and be too restless.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #110  
Old 02-13-2009
Bene505's Avatar
Glad I found Sailnet
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 3,633
Thanks: 5
Thanked 40 Times in 39 Posts
Rep Power: 8
Bene505 will become famous soon enough Bene505 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
... Earlier this year Wombette and I spent some time on a Benetteau 505. Damn that was a nice boat. Bit big for me but shrink it down a tadge and I'd have one in a shot. That thing has sailed almost the entire east coast of Oz with nary a problem. Her below decks wreaked quality and that garage up front was ginormous...
WARNING, CONTENTS CONTAINS OUTRIGHT GLOATING. I WAITED, AND STOPPED FROM REPLYING TO TDW's POST, BUT IT HAS TO BE SAID. SO PLEASE FORGIVE IN ADVANCE.

It was an easy decision getting our 2000 Beneteau 505. Last summer, while I was bidding on her and low-balling the seller a bit, someone else made an asking price offer and took her off the market. (His offer was 19K over what I got the seller down to.) I had a huge sense of loss at this. It pretty much ruined my 4th of July weekend. The more I thought about it, and the more I looked at other boats and their prices, the more I realized that she was a great boat at a great price. And I had looked intently for 2 hours a day for 6 months at that point, and had full surveys done on 2 other boats already. I had driven from New York to Maryland to look her over and spent 4+ hours looking her over from stem to stern. There was a spinnaker (some rips, I found out later) that was not on the listing. There was a brand new dodger that was not in the listing, (IIRC, it still had the plastic wrap on it like it had never been mounted). The jib was (still is) in great shape, main good shape. Also the engine looked in great shape for 5,000 hours. [If I knew then how well it ran, it would have been a deal maker right then, but I followed their rules about not starting her up until we had an agreed price. I figured there must have been a problem with it.]

I felt a sense of loss, that I missed the perfect boat for us.

Going back to the seller's website a couple weeks later, THERE SHE WAS!!! The previous buyer's financing fell through. I picked up the phone and made an offer for the price I got the seller down to earlier. And the rest is history.

Apologies if I'm gloating now (hey, I warned you)... She sails really well, she's big enough for my whole family, plus a cousin or helper, and we use the crew quarter's area up front as a garage. Although she was in the Moorings fleet, according to the surveyor, she had no hard encounters with pilings. The cockpit can seat 8 for dinner or cocktails watching the sun set, and there's a transom door that I can leave open to help the cockpit drain if needed. She sleeps 8 in beds, 1 more in the crew quarters, plus another on the couch, if needed. I like the little solar panel that keeps the batteries at full charge (and even charges them a little when we aren't on the boat). I really like the keel shape (fin, with a bit of a bulb). I really like the windlass and chain. I really like the dinghy davits. We designated one of the 4 heads for showering and have plenty of room to store everything we need. She has 7 engine/transmission hatches that let me get to the engine easily. I also like the 268 gallons of water and 134 gallons of fuel. Finally, and very importantly, the parts and support from Beneteau is absolutely, positively, 100%, universally-agreed-upon, *excellent*.

(Ok, enough gloating)

She does need a few things, and some of this is more personalizing her than real problems. She sails at anchor - needs an anchor sail. We need to get the (new to us) wind generator on, since we spend a lot of time at our mooring or on the hook. Maybe the wind generator will help reduce sailing at anchor? Add a charge controller for the wind generator. Add a dump load to the water heater and cabin fans. She needs her batteries strapped down better (Beneteau owners, please send pics of how yours is secured). I'd like radar (next year maybe). I'm thinking about electric refrigeration to supplement engine driven, since we won't be using the engine that much - I still haven't given up putting an electric compressor into the existing freon/cold plate circuit, but only after talking with more experts. Swapping incandescents for LEDs. GPS with a map (the autopilot provides lat/long from it's GPS). Fuel and tank cleaning (just in case). Rudder had a little water in it, and has some play. Speed transducer needs to be replaced. Rig inspection. (And can I climb up there at 210 lbs? Not sure I want to. But darn it, don't I just have to?) And how does a Windex get slightly bent, anyway? I want a carbon monoxide detector. Looking for a sea anchor and snatch block (ala Pardey Storm Tactics), probably next year - just bought a very small ATM Gale Sail. Before we do serious blue water, I'd like to have a tri-sail and a separate track for it - or the kind of trisail that wraps around the mast. Add some training in diesel engine maintenance. Add a lot more solo practice, since I love to sail with or without crew. Oh, and winter storage for a 50' boat is $3,600 around here. Next winter I may leave it in, for 1/2 the price, so we can sail on nice winter days. I know some good crew from our October BFS.

Overrall a sweet boat. IMHO, ex-Mooring fleet Beneteaus are a very good way to get a great boat at a decent price.
__________________
.
.
Great minds discuss ideas;
Average minds discuss events;
Small minds discuss people.
.
The best minds discuss sailing. I don't know why. It's a mystery!
.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beneteau 370 or Bavaria 34?? vellad Boat Review and Purchase Forum 7 04-14-2009 03:13 PM
Beneteau Attitude Suck for You? gtsusa Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 09-20-2007 11:35 AM
Club Beneteau Florida Invitation Jeffrey123 Gear & Maintenance 0 09-11-2004 12:42 PM
Beneteau Club FLorida Invitation Jeffrey123 General Discussion (sailing related) 0 09-11-2004 12:40 PM
The Beneteau 361 Micca Hutchins Buying a Boat Articles 0 10-07-1999 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 04:02 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.