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-   -   Beginner's questions (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/49295-beginners-questions.html)

BTK111 11-29-2008 03:37 PM

Beginner's questions
 
Hi All, I'm a beginner sailor looking for a good starter boat. I looked at a 22' Sailmaster(1964) and had a few concerns I wanted to find out about. First, when I lifted the floor boards in the cabin there was a couple inches of water under there. I was told this was a normal amount from rain drainage etc. Does that sound right? Second there is a small spot on the hull inside where it meets a bulkhead (not positive I'm using the correct term) and there appears to be some seperation and a small amount of water seepage. I'm wondering if this is a potentially serious problem or a more minor fix. I also have pictures of this spot if that could be more helpful. Thanks for your advice!!

tschmidty 11-29-2008 04:08 PM

Pictures can only help, but you can't post them right away so you'd have to figure a way around that.

As far as the water in the bilge it really depends on where it is coming from as to how drastic the problem is. Some water seepage indicates delamination of the fiberglass but the damage should be visible from the outside as well (somewhere). Is the problem area you describe above or below the waterline?

In general, most people are going to say pass unless it is a super good deal. You are probably not paying enough to make a survey worthwhile but some ideas of your intended sailing would be good.

josrulz 11-29-2008 05:39 PM

Hi BTK111, welcome to Sailnet. As tschmidty mentioned, it would help to have some information about your sailing area and the way in which you intend to use the boat (daysailing, racing, overnights/weekends, etc.). This way, we might be able to provide some recommendations potentially on other makes/models of boats you haven't thought of.

I don't think any of us can really determine the condition of the boat you're describing specifically without seeing it, but I will say this: I used to teach sailing, and I firmly believe in simplicity for beginning sailors. I also believe that a boat in good condition is the best place to start. As a beginning sailor, you need time on the water, not in your backyard fixing your boat. If the boat is simple to operate and in good condition, you're most likely to use it! That's all just my opinion, of course. Good luck in your search!
-J

rikhall 11-29-2008 09:47 PM

Just a thought from my personal experience.

Take a look at a Tanzer 22. We had one for five years, great starter boat, super support Yahoo group, dry as a bone - no water in the bilge at all. Built like a tank and in my opinion, sails very well.

blt2ski 11-29-2008 09:52 PM

With out a picture and a way to look at the leak, it is hard to say if easy or hard fix.

I'd probably pass on this boat, as you can find better kept up boats of that size.

Other brands, Catalina 22, San Juan 21, Balboa, Aquarius, O'Day off the top of my head are all reasonably found TS's like the one you're looking at too.

Marty

bubb2 11-29-2008 10:41 PM

I don't know about the 22 sailmaster. However, I have a buddy who sails a 26 sailmaster. His is a mid 60's vintage. I have sailed the boat and it sails well. it is well build and has good hardware. I would think the 22 would also.

Sailormann 11-29-2008 11:27 PM

The water under the floorboards is normal. The area under the floorboards (which are referred to usually as "the sole") is called the bilge and it is unusual to find a bilge that is completely dry.

The bulkhead seperating from the hull could be anything from a very minor thing (if it just started) to a serious issue. With the condition of the market right now - I would suggest that you keep looking. There are too many really great boats out there to settle for anything dicey.

Repairing small boats is not usually that costly in terms of materials, but the cramped quarters make it difficult to work efficiently or neatly. After making a repair it is frequently necessary to cap the project by refinishing significant parts of the interior or exterior in order to make the boat look nice again.

This refinishing can add a lot to the cost of the boat.


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