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  #21  
Old 02-24-2009
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You posted a link to picture of a swiftsure towing a dinghy about the third of it's length so you can look and see what it looks like. I tow a 9'9" inflatable behind a 26' MacGregor and I am sure it looks like an inflatable the military would use, it is rather large (17" tubes) and has a little 5hp engine on the transom. I have to run my 50HP on the back of my Macgregor about an extra 500 rpm to compensate for the drag and maintain the same speed I like without towing (about 8 knots). It is a real joy to have a little dinghy to scoot around in and explore with when I get to any destination but I confess that I absolutely hate towing the stupid thing around with me, too much drag and always have to keep a watch on it. I only tow it when on extended trips of several days otherwise I'll go without just because it slows me down. One time I was crossing the San Juan Channel under sail and it seemd like the other few sailboats were passing me like I as sitting still because the dinghy really slowed us down under sail. You will lose about 2 knots depending on the weight while towing. They are a pain to tow but a joy to have.
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  #22  
Old 02-24-2009
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There'll be no problem towing a dinhy, but it will slow you down some. In chop or heavy rain and a hard dinghy it's useful to have a drain plug open so that any spray/rain doesn't accumulate and really make the little tub heavy. You just need to remember to replace the plug once you stop moving and before taking Bowser ashore!

Your boat is too small to carry the tender, so you're pretty much stuck with towing it.
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  #23  
Old 02-24-2009
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If you're willing to spend more on your tender than you did on the yacht, I saw at the boat show this 10-lb inflatable that rolls up and stows in a tiny bag. Amazing.

I shopped around a bit and went with a 14' SeaEagle inflatable kayak, which tucks neatly into a quarter berth when rolled up. 35 lbs, though. While it's probably not as tough as hypalon or whatever, I figure I can destroy five or six of them for the price of a real inflatable. Takes about ten minutes to set up; we've been using it to go ashore in the San Juans. Haven't tried towing it due to the chop... I expect it would flip.
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  #24  
Old 02-24-2009
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Kayaks are a great idea, esp the plastic ones (beachproof) but problematic on a boat under 30 feet - they don't tow well as a rule and even the little 10 footers take up some deck space. The inflatable ones such as Adam mentions get the job done but are susceptible to oysters and barnacles, like any other inflatable.

Looking forward to hearing how your weekend turns out, Serah!
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  #25  
Old 02-25-2009
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I was reasonably surprised to see people on here so local! I'm at Lynnwood at the moment, been there a couple of years now and it's pretty good despite the constant price increases...

The best thing about it is that it's simple to just go under the second narrows to go for a day trip up the indian arm, or pay a bit more attention to the tides and head out towards howe sound to Gibsons etc. Good day trips. Definitely a bit tedious to get all the way out from the marina to English Bay, I can't imagine it from Port Moody there, deep cove would be a bit of a pain too I think.

Anyways, I have a US25 and it pulls the dinghy well enough. Mines a deflatable one though and not a proper tender as you may have. I suppose it depends on the motor on the boat itself, but the merc 9.9 I had before did ok. I do have to say that the high thrust yamaha 9.9 on now does a better job though.. pricey but well worth the extra power and reliance/efficiency and quietness. I would expect you to be slowed down a good knot or two I think. I don't have much more info on that, I'll let the more experienced speak up here.

On a related note, I would never buy a boat with a squishy deck. After doing enough research on the subject, no matter how cheap the boat, it just seems like way too much work to be worth it. Lotsa boats out there, no need to buy one that it just going to be lots of work. I got my boat without having to put anything into it other than what I wanted to put in. Sailable at the point of purchase is very attractive in my mind.
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Old 02-25-2009
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Serah, got that link for the ultralight. It's called a "Feathercraft" (Feathercraft Folding Kayaks & Accessories) and it's not as expensive as I recall. I got to toss one up in the air at the boat show -- it really is ultralight, and still seems fairly rugged. Rolls up into a backpack-sized back (2 ft. x 8" x 10").
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  #27  
Old 02-25-2009
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I love the idea of a kayak! However, wrestling my bumbling, uncoordinated 70 lbs. golden retriever mutt (see my avatar!) into one seems like a recipe for wet. Also, as I used to instruct/guide kayaking, I'm a bit of a kayak snob, and would likely be appalled at the way those paddle As the boat is of such low value already, I'm disinclined to dump an equal amount into a new (or even used) dinghy. Especially as the lovely Galleon is mine already. Also, as we're so limited on space down below it makes stowing an inflatable down there rather unappealing.

I'm still not that psyched about Reed Point, but worry that holding out on a "maybe" at Burrard might turn out to be a no, and likely the one remaining slip at Reed would be gone, and then we're stuck with a boat, and nowhere to keep her. Summer nights on the Arm is better than watching from the shore, right? Plus it's only six months, and we'll be talking to marina's over in Victoria soon to figure out moorage for the fall. I'm one of the lucky few that will now have 3 boats I sail on regularly (two out of false creek - a CS 27 for racing, and the family 42' for longer cruising) 4 if you count the Galleon

How long will the results from a survey take to come through? We haul at 10.30 on Saturday, and the surveyor will be there with us around 9. Assuming all is well, we were hoping to close on her this weekend. Is this completely unrealistic?

If we decide this is our girl, we'll spend the rest of the weekend in harbour at RVicYC doing some of the essential projects (*cough* new battery *cough*) as we don't think we'll have time to run up to Montague Saturday afternoon. The prospect of anchoring an unfamiliar boat in the dark seems... well ridiculously reckless. So she'll stay in Victoria until the next weekend, leaving the full two days to sail her home.
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  #28  
Old 02-26-2009
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Sounds pretty exciting. We bought our sailboat last June (first boat). The surveyor gave a verbal report at the end of the survey and said there was no reason not to buy the boat. The written report we received by email a couple of days later was much more detailed and to my mind not as upbeat as the surveyor was at the time. Never having been through the process I waited until I had received the written report before making a decision. In the end it did not change our minds but it could have. The written report made it clear that certain things needed to be done and since the insurance company wants a copy of the survey I assume those things must be done for the insurance to be valid.

Maybe your surveyor will have the time at the end to go over his findings in detail. Mine had a pretty full schedule. He was thorough and used his time in the field to survey and his time in the office to report.

I know it is hard to wait once you think you have made up your mind! Good luck this weekend.
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  #29  
Old 02-26-2009
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He'll give you a talking to right then and there, pointing out the good and the bad so you could make the call then. Depending on the surveryor, he will write something mroe official probably within a few days.

We have had dinghy struggles with our 24; mainly in deciding what is best. The little hard dinghy we have is so small it is unstable so we went with a small, cheaper inflatable... but it doesn't tow in the traditional manner. We can tow it by tying it right to the pushpit... it looks silly but it works.

In a boat that small, I would suggest buying a cheaper inflatable and carrying small battery charged pump to inflate it at the end of the day when it is time to go to shore. That is what has worked best for us. When you are sailing across the straight in a small boat at 4-5 knots, 1-2 knots for a towed dinghy is a big sacrifice.
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  #30  
Old 02-26-2009
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I spoke with the surveyor yesterday - he said results would be ready Tuesday, in our hands by Thursday. I also spoke with Westland Insurance yesterday - unfortunately, they weren't able to give me a quote - or even an estimate - without all of the info (I grumble, but it makes sense.) They were incredibly concerned about the age of the boat - she seems concerned about even getting insurance on a boat that old! Which really surprises me. Do you know anyone who has come up against that before? And without insurance - no moorage (again, a perfectly logical business decision.) We're both quite comfortable walking away from this deal if there are big problems. What concerns me is that the surveyor is not an insurance broker - he's not going to be able to say whether we'll be able to insure her. I don't want to be stuck with a boat I can't insure, and therefore can't keep anywhere. I guess just deal with it when it comes up. Argh.

As for the dinghy, we may have to accept keeping something rolled up below decks if only as a ditch boat. The boy disagrees, but I'm really not interested in losing 2 knots on a long crossing.
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