A Discussion of the Philosophies of Cruising and Circumnavigating - Page 11 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree26Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #101  
Old 05-07-2009
chall03's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sydney
Posts: 1,509
Thanks: 14
Thanked 20 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 12
chall03 will become famous soon enough
Sounds great TDW,

We have just started venturing further afield in baby steps, Port Stephens is going to be next, Jervis Bay shortly there after.....

When we reboat the plan is Queensland/GBR to shakedown, and then depending on time/money/how we are finding it all, we would do a similar loop to what your thinking turn right at Cairns and go Louisiades, Solomons, Vanuatu, New Cal and then home.

There is a thought of going from here to Lord Howe as a shakedown. However Lord howe to me is far scarier than 3 months of sailing up to Cairns. It is essentially 400ish nms of Tasman Sea. For beginners like us that isn't a small feat.
__________________
'Life is either a daring adventure or nothing' - Helen Keller



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #102  
Old 05-07-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Kemah, TX
Posts: 125
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 8
LWinters is on a distinguished road
Send a message via MSN to LWinters
I guess I decided that if I was going to go to all the effort to buy and refit a boat, save the money, quit a good job, and go sailing then I was going for the long haul.

The plan is to use 2008 to continue working down from Belize to Honduras, offshore to Isla Provadencia, San Blas and Cartagena Columbia, then through the Panama Canal for the spring 2010 pacific season. I can see about as far as Tahiti after that, but won't even pretend to guess what the cards hold after that. A northern route through the suez and med or southern route around good hope?

Right now I just want to enjoy the countries between here and 10N where I am heading to escape the coming hurricane season. Never again after IKE.

Lee
__________________
s/v Jargo
Singlehanding to Panama and beyond

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #103  
Old 05-07-2009
tdw's Avatar
tdw tdw is offline
Super Fuzzy Moderator
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Sydney Australia
Posts: 14,328
Thanks: 5
Thanked 67 Times in 62 Posts
Rep Power: 10
tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough tdw is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by chall03 View Post
Sounds great TDW,

We have just started venturing further afield in baby steps, Port Stephens is going to be next, Jervis Bay shortly there after.....

When we reboat the plan is Queensland/GBR to shakedown, and then depending on time/money/how we are finding it all, we would do a similar loop to what your thinking turn right at Cairns and go Louisiades, Solomons, Vanuatu, New Cal and then home.

There is a thought of going from here to Lord Howe as a shakedown. However Lord howe to me is far scarier than 3 months of sailing up to Cairns. It is essentially 400ish nms of Tasman Sea. For beginners like us that isn't a small feat.
Chall,
Baby steps are good.
Jervis is our next one. We didn't get up to Port stephens, weather and time mucked up the plan . Got to Newcastle then ran out of time. Jervis should be a nice wee cruise. Chance to do an overnighter, bit more of a test of the old navigational skills. I'd like to do my Yachtmaster so will need to do the passage requirements. I've done more than enough over the years but not recently so want to do it again with it all signed off etc. YM Coastal is 300nms with two passages of at least 50 and one of at least 100 , from memory. Jervis is 75 (return ergo 150) and Port Stephens 65 (130) so I'd like to do Lord Howe as the long one. Would give me much more than I need. That would also give me passage time of at least 10 days, need 15. Run up the coast to , say, Coffs would take care of the rest. Then again we are also thinking of doing the Heaven Can Wait this year.
Ref Lord Howe, yes it is a doozey. Sydney is not the best place to start from given the prevailing is probably going to be from the NE. Out of Sydney that means a hard beat to windward. Better to get up the coast a bit and head out from round Coffs or Port Macquarie. If you get the weather right then coming home is a reach. If time permits, and for those of us still working that can be a snag, then a port hop up the coast would make for a very pleasant enough shakedown cruise before heading offshore proper. Now, given that the run up the coast will be a beat it would be nice to be able to pop into port most nights to freshen up. The harsh reality is that heading north from Sydney is almost always going to be a slog unless you are lucky enough to grab hold off the tail end of a southerly. Then you are left with a reach to Lord Howe which is what you want for a first offshore.
I've crewed on longer than passage to Lord Howe but not skippered. Going offshore in one's own boat is indeed a big step and yes, it makes me somewhat nervous to think about it, but to my mind overconfidence would be worse than a slight case of the jitters.
__________________
Andrew B

“Give a man a fire and he's warm for a day, but set fire to him and he's warm for the rest of his life.” Terry Pratchett

Last edited by tdw; 05-10-2009 at 10:20 PM.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #104  
Old 05-10-2009
Jim H's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 594
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Jim H is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
I've crewed on longer than passage to Lord Howe but not skippered. Going offshore in one's own boat is indeed a big step and yes, it makes me somewhat nervous to think about it, but to my mind overconfidence would be worse than a slight case of the jitters.
I feel somewhat lucky in that it's easy in the UK to sign up for a 7-21 day offshore learning experience, primarily for gaining sea miles and to learn from a yachtmaster. Last year, both my wife and I crossed the channel (only 65 miles, and not true "offshore"), but we did it on separate RYA trips and learned alot about crossing shipping lanes and doing night watches.

We hope to do the same this June with the kids on our own boat, and we're preparing accordingly (epirb, improved safety gear, paper charts, etc.). It's another step.
__________________
Jim H
London, UK

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Aurora, a mighty Cal 20 (Portland, OR)
Southern Rival, a seasoned Rival 34 (Gosport, UK)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #105  
Old 05-20-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 7
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
danz101 is on a distinguished road
Try my position, i'm in melbourne and whilst an avid reader of these forums havent actually written anything

I dont know if its a blessing or a curse, a massive bay to go sailing in relatively pleasant conditions, but any ocean cruising = tasman sea or the southern ocean !

Still getting into it and dont own a boat myself so not too much of a concern at present - might have to move to QLD though.

Dan.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #106  
Old 05-25-2009
EBdreamn's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Northwest PA
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
EBdreamn is on a distinguished road
I admire those who are willing and able to do more with less. It must be exhilerating for them to undertake their quests under the most severe and primative circumstances. It is no less exhilerating for me to watch them with ice in my drink, cool air in my bunk and every technological advantage guarding my life as I explore the same world. I know my limits and I am not ashamed nor diminished by them. I applaud and to a degree envy those made of stiffer stuff.....but I am grateful that it no longer takes this fabric to see the world from the deck of a boat under my own terms and control. I eagerly watch and listen for the sounds of their triumphs....wait let me turn down the stereo...ok... go.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #107  
Old 05-25-2009
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Posts: 4,966
Thanks: 5
Thanked 18 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 11
wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about wind_magic has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by EBdreamn View Post
I admire those who are willing and able to do more with less. It must be exhilerating for them to undertake their quests under the most severe and primative circumstances. It is no less exhilerating for me to watch them with ice in my drink, cool air in my bunk and every technological advantage guarding my life as I explore the same world. I know my limits and I am not ashamed nor diminished by them. I applaud and to a degree envy those made of stiffer stuff.....but I am grateful that it no longer takes this fabric to see the world from the deck of a boat under my own terms and control. I eagerly watch and listen for the sounds of their triumphs....wait let me turn down the stereo...ok... go.
Doing more with less. There is nothing wrong with focusing on the "with less" part, I suppose, not having ice, or a stereo, etc, but I find it more interesting to focus on the "do more" part of the phrase.

Two hypothetical young cruisers each sell their basic home for 300k$us and intend to go cruising ...

Young Cruiser #1 wants the creature comforts, wants the bigger boat, etc, nothing wrong with that, that's the great thing about cruising, you can do whatever you want within your own limits. So Cruiser #1 spends half on a boat - 100k$us, and refits with most of the comforts, ice maker, stereo, all the rest, solar panels, water maker, and by the time it's all said and done let's say the cruiser has spent 160k$us leaving about 140k$us. The cruiser wants to stay in marinas at 50$us/night maybe once a week (2.6k$us/year), eats at restaurants for 50$us/week (2.6k$us/year), insures the boat well, and blah blah blah, and basically ends up spending 40k$us/year in expenses to live in basic comfort. So with that 140k$us they had left, divide that out and let's say they can go cruising for 4 years before they run out of money, a nice comfortable long vacation the cruiser will never forget.

Young Cruiser #2 gives up the creature comforts and economizes, wants the very basic smaller boat, etc, and is careful with their money. No ice, no stereo, maybe a solar panel for their VHF, but nothing fancy at all. Cruiser #2 starts with an inexpensive boat, shops around and finds one for 50k$us, 70k$us after refit with the basics (wind vane self-steering and little else). They never stay at marinas, don't eat at restaurants, and all the rest, and manage to drive their expenses down to 6k$us/year (people have lived on less). So all said and done out of their initial 300k$us they've spent 70k$us on the boat leaving them with 230k$us, and invested at 5% interest that is 11.5k$us year in interest, of which they use 6k$us for expenses, leaving a surplus of 5.5k$us/year. If the cruiser ever decides to go back to life on land they've got 230k$us in their pocket plus whatever surplus they've saved along the way.

Same 300k$us initial investment; Cruiser #1 has the comforts and goes back to work in 4 years, broke, and Cruiser #2 goes without the comforts and goes back to civilization whenever they want, or never.

Enjoy your ice.
barefootnavigator likes this.
__________________
What are you pretending not to know ?

Please support my
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #108  
Old 05-26-2009
EBdreamn's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: Northwest PA
Posts: 23
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
EBdreamn is on a distinguished road
I appreciate the analysis...and I can't say I disagree with any of it. In fact the hardest part of starting the journey away from civilization is not...for most....finding the money ....its finding the nerve. If the mission is to get out and stay out and not ever really work again, then rationing cash is the same idea as rationing water on a long passage. Its all critical to the mission. I don't think you are saying that cruiser #1 is some how inferior to #2 just because he may run out of money and return to land...my point in the previous post was....sort of....that both are experiencing the same world in different ways...which is good...I wan't everyone to be here...good things happen out here whether you have ice or not. I read every post in this string before putting in my own. I was attempting to comment on what I saw as an unfriendly/unsailorly attitude toward those who use their money in a certain way...to buy comfort afloat essentially...ice if you will. No one with any sense wants to be viewed as a poser who simply goes out and attempts to substitute experience with gear...and I admit there is a certain satisfaction every time I hand a golf partner his hat having used my 30 year old well worn clubs when he's swinging more titanium than an F-16. I get it.....but.....At the end of the day I still want him as a friend and equally important is the fact that the experiences we share are fundamentally more important than how we come by those experiences. It is not fundamentally foolish to use your money....and that is what this divide seems to be about $$$$......it is not foolish to use your money to buy stuff..sailing or otherwise. It is also not necessarily a superior experience to do with out the stuff....though it has its own special rewards... I suspect that posers will eventually return to land because they are not cut out for the wet life....that or maybe...just maybe.... they will see that they can do more with less and begin to pare down the must have list.....I understand the exhilleration of using each tool to its utmost and accomplishing mission after mission without EPIRB, insurance or 3 heads....but I am equally understanding of how we all need to be accepting of each others personal choices.....expect the best of each other and invite the Oyster owner over for a cocktail and a story.....he may bring ice.....and his exploits are possibly quite entertaining......count no one out....include everyone....share everything...add more than you take........these are universal pole stars of sailing...and life. Besides....vodka and cranberry sucks warm.....
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #109  
Old 05-27-2009
vega1860's Avatar
Swab
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: At Sea
Posts: 689
Thanks: 0
Thanked 16 Times in 14 Posts
Rep Power: 8
vega1860 is on a distinguished road
No stereo?!?!?

Even I won't go that far. In fact, my next expenditure will be for an ipod and compatible tuner/amp. The old Tuner/CD/Cassette unit died on us and is holding my favorite Beach Boys CD hostage

Meanwhile, I've transferred all of my music to an external hard drive and got rid of the CDs - forty pounds weight savings and a couple of cubic feet of storage freed up.

In port it is not so much of a problem as we use the laptop as an entertainment center, but at sea the computer goes into the waterproof case and we need our soundtrack.
__________________

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #110  
Old 06-22-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2004
Location: Washington state / Florida
Posts: 10
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
captmikem is on a distinguished road
Been reading all these, as I have been ashore for a few years now and am thinking it is time to go to sea again. So here are a few of my thoughts on circumnavigating and cruising:
I have been around twice. First time took three years second time two years. Both were too fast. Many side trips up north of Alaska, Baffin Island, and Disko Greenland. Not to far south, Stewart island probably the farthest south. I have sailed close to half a million miles, and I would go around again.
You can say “I want to go to Spain” or “I want to go to Fiji” But when you head west around the world it is a voyage, not a destination. And so many things to see along the way that you can not even imagine. We came through Panama one time and decided to head south to Easter Island instead of the normal route to the Marquises. What a great trip that was, stopped at the Galapagos, and Pitcarin Island. That is what it is all about.
But also I enjoy small trips as well, over to the med for a summer or more, then back across the Atlantic, it is a good trip and lots to see. Without exceptions every time we have made the crossing from the Canaries to the West Indies, when land finally hove into sight, everyone aboard would say “Do we have to stop? Can’t we just keep on sailing”. Admittedly it is one of the nicest, easiest ocean passages in the world, but many are like that.
We went across the Aleutians to Petropavlovsk, Bering island and the Kuril islands, then returned to Alaska. What a bunch of fun. A great side trip.
I stayed in Carins for a while, sailing up to PNG to do some great diving. Oz is such a great place to sail, so much in the north that is so beautiful yet few people spend the time there. The people in Gove welcomed us like old friends, let us a car and fed us in their homes.
We did a figure of eight around New Zealand. Few people get down to the south of the south island. The Fjords there are absolutely worth the trip. And all you have to do is point the bow in that direction.
Just going someplace, getting out of the anchorage or marina and going for an adventure. That is what cruising is about.
Just a few thoughts, I do love GPS, I have been using it since 1986 when we just had a few hours a day of fix, but it was so nice. I DR’d across the Atlantic once, so cloudy I could never get a sight. But it worked out. I think if I had only one item, it would be radar. Radar is very nice.
I like chutes, the run from the Canaries to Barbados or Antigua is one of the nicest in the world. I have carried a chute nearly every time I have made this crossing. I usually sail with just my wife, so having a Sock is a very nice thing. But you don’t need to carry a chute if you do not want to; Next to a chute, a 130 on a pole is my favorite. We have cranked out some high mileage days with the jib on a pole and the main on the other. Day after day after day. Beautiful days.
I probably should, but I have not used a harness in years, just seems cumbersome. Not suggesting anyone else get rid of theirs. I figure if I go over the side, I am dead anyway so I just hang on tight. I remember being hove to in a gale of wind heading down to the Canaries, middle of the night and the wind increased like crazy, the reef line chaffed through, lightening and rain all around, blowing like stink, I was trying to wrap a line around the main when a huge gust hit us and laid us down. I grabbed onto the shrouds and was flogging like a flag in the wind, but I never felt like I was going over the side. Lucky I guess.
I like roller headsails and jiffy reefing full battened mains. With all leads running to the base of the mast. These boats that have halyards and reef gear under the dodger are a pain to me. You can not see the sail as you crank a halyard or reef line so you have to guess what you are doing, you are not in a good position, if things hang up you have go square them away anyway, then come back. Just better at the base of the mast where you can deal with it and see it and crank it right there.
A requirement? A good autopilot or vane. I like Pacific Plus or Monitor vane, and Robertson autopilots.
For size, the first boat I sailed around the world was a Frerrs Pamer Johnson 80. 80 feet is fine for speed and room, but it is a bit much for two people to handle. Spinnaker poles were carbon fiber so they were not too heavy but it took both of us to set it. We put about 35000 miles on an Alden 54, that was a pretty good size for two people. We are at the moment about to close on a 46 foot cutter. She should be easy to single hand and a pleasure for two people.
I like digital charts, refrigeration, and watermakers, but if push came to shove I could do without them. I have grown to enjoy SSb with a Pactor for weather and cruising chat. Nice thing to have. And DVD’s.
What I like is the beauty of the ocean, the sight of dolphin on the bow, whales jumping, sunsets and sunrises that take your breath away. Snug anchorages and drinks in the cockpit with folks that are so different yet so much the same.
Everything is real at sea, nothing fake. You can pour a billion dollars into the sea and it will not calm it, you can tell the wind how important you are and it does not care. You can show a squall your credentials and your diplomas and it will just blow them out of your hands. Everything is real and you are totally responsible for yourself. You can not buy it. You have to go with it, let go and fly with things. You can’t sue the sea. At least not yet.
Mostly, circumnavigating is about meeting people and seeing things and places. A very good way to spend the short amount of time we are given on this earth.
barefootnavigator likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Excellent Circumnavigating Cruising Cat for sale tdreffin Introduce Yourself 0 12-01-2008 10:40 AM
Circumnavigating Budget Tom Wood Cruising Articles 0 10-15-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:15 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012