A Discussion of the Philosophies of Cruising and Circumnavigating - Page 12 - SailNet Community
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post #111 of 159 Old 06-25-2009
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As I understand it, this is an invitation to share my philosophy about sailing, cruising and circumnavigation. So my philosophy is that I just want to sail, but I am not going anywhere, that is, just to the next harbour. Remaining in that harbour for the rest of my life is one of the possible options I have. Under this philosophy I started sailing from Oslo, Norway towards south, last summer, with absolutely no hurry, as I was retired that year. I have posted a photo of my ship in some other thread that I hope i manage to link to: Living on a mooring.

Under this philosophy I finally reached the bay Of Biscay, where my ship was lost by another ship that had agreed to tow it ashore, to the harbour of Arcachon in France, because of engine trouble. The story is blogged Tjaldurs reise til Karibbien - Bjørn. This blog is in Norwegian, but google has a facility for translating websites from any language to any other. This translation is possibly more fun to read than the original, as google really invents some fascinating metaphors in the translation.

Since I lived in my ship and no insurance company wanted to insure a ship that was older than 70 years, (my ship was 75) I am now back in Oslo saving money out of my decent, but not luxurious retirement (67 % of the average of my 20 best earning years as a municipally employed lion tamer, or as the community of Oslo would describe it: director of an institution for juvenile delinquents.

Accordingly my philosophy has developed into a quite simple one. I will sail with whatever I have got by next spring and I will buy the equipment as I sail along. The only thing I know for sure is that the boat will be between 30 - 35 feet. Probably built around -85. It will have a long keel and at least 35 % of the weight under the water line.

Concerning equipment, a radar will be the first piece of equipment that I will buy. (I have already the charts, as C-map was very helpfull in restoring my charts and NavSimm was very helpful in restoring my chart-reader on my new laptop. (Absolutely everything was lost except the few clothes that I was waring and my Visa-card).

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #112 of 159 Old 06-25-2009 Thread Starter
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Originally Posted by tjaldur View Post
As I understand it, this is an invitation to share my philosophy about sailing, cruising and circumnavigation. So my philosophy is that I just want to sail, but I am not going anywhere, that is, just to the next harbour. Remaining in that harbour for the rest of my life is one of the possible options I have. Under this philosophy I started sailing from Oslo, Norway towards south, last summer, with absolutely no hurry, as I was retired that year. I have posted a photo of my ship in some other thread that I hope i manage to link to: Living on a mooring.

Under this philosophy I finally reached the bay Of Biscay, where my ship was lost by another ship that had agreed to tow it ashore, to the harbour of Arcachon in France, because of engine trouble. The story is blogged Tjaldurs reise til Karibbien - Bjørn. This blog is in Norwegian, but google has a facility for translating websites from any language to any other. This translation is possibly more fun to read than the original, as google really invents some fascinating metaphors in the translation.

Since I lived in my ship and no insurance company wanted to insure a ship that was older than 70 years, (my ship was 75) I am now back in Oslo saving money out of my decent, but not luxurious retirement (67 % of the average of my 20 best earning years as a municipally employed lion tamer, or as the community of Oslo would describe it: director of an institution for juvenile delinquents.

Accordingly my philosophy has developed into a quite simple one. I will sail with whatever I have got by next spring and I will buy the equipment as I sail along. The only thing I know for sure is that the boat will be between 30 - 35 feet. Probably built around -85. It will have a long keel and at least 35 % of the weight under the water line.

Concerning equipment, a radar will be the first piece of equipment that I will buy. (I have already the charts, as C-map was very helpfull in restoring my charts and NavSimm was very helpful in restoring my chart-reader on my new laptop. (Absolutely everything was lost except the few clothes that I was waring and my Visa-card).
Ouch... what a loss!! she looked a beautiful boat! Nice to have you around here too!

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post #113 of 159 Old 06-25-2009
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@ Cruisingdad:

Staying around here is the best way to boost my fidelity in my dreams. If not, I would spend the rest of my life feeeding the pidgeons in the park.

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #114 of 159 Old 06-27-2009
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a Fascinating thread;
While I cannot afford many of the luxuries enjoyed by others with more income than I have, Rhosyn Mor is my home and I keep it as comfortable as is possible. Started off with a day sail to the hook of holland, and just kept going. 7 years later have crossed the med twice and the atlantic once,
put 12K miles under the keel and still having a wonderful time. I see too many people waiting and waiting for just the right boat, or just the right piece of gear, or just another few thousand.
IMHO in some ways the Pardey's were right, go with what you have. You will adapt to sailing with what you have If your vessel is not a " bluwater" type you can get to lots of places and never stray more than a couple of days from land.
WOuld love to have radar, and SSB transceiver, but income wise they are not on the cards for another year or two.
Things that are Vital:
Lots of tankage
Light air sails
Self steering
Battery power- I have just put in two more 8d's to bring it up to 950 AH
LED lights
SSB receiver - I use a KAITO
Good quality head- LAvac
COmfortable berths and at least one good sea berth
Storage, and more storage
lots of spare line
redundancy in all systems
way overkill ground tackle, and lots of it, there are times I have used all four anchors
an open mind and a sense of wonder
deep cockpit with good drainage
high bridgedeck
harness and tethers
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post #115 of 159 Old 06-27-2009
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I think a lot of people waiting for the latest gear, or to do a replacement for gear. I think they are making excuses. I have seen people do this for years on years. Well I just have to get this, and I am ready, and then they need something else.

There's nothing wrong with not cruising. Can you imagine what it would be like if every boat owner was a cruiser? There would be no anchorages left !......i2f

20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
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post #116 of 159 Old 06-27-2009
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@ rhosynMor:

Now if you are sailing all around, perhaps you should consider taking a trip to Denmark to this place: Fornaes Shipbreaking - Scandinavias largest stock of used marine diesel engines and ship equipment: This is the place where all the Danish fishing-ships that are taken out of fishing tonnage end. The parts are sold. I once bought a perfectly good Furuno radar there for DKK 4000,- equivalent to about $700,-

Use your head, ram the wall till it falls.
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post #117 of 159 Old 06-27-2009
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Started off with a day sail to the hook of holland, and just kept going. 7 years later have crossed the med twice and the atlantic once, put 12K miles under the keel and still having a wonderful time. I see too many people waiting and waiting for just the right boat, or just the right piece of gear, or just another few thousand.
I think this is the hardest part, throwing off the dock lines.

Your post reminded me of this story, the 200 millionaire.

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post #118 of 159 Old 06-27-2009
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.Everything is real at sea, nothing fake. You can pour a billion dollars into the sea and it will not calm it, you can tell the wind how important you are and it does not care. You can show a squall your credentials and your diplomas and it will just blow them out of your hands. Everything is real and you are totally responsible for yourself. You can not buy it. You have to go with it, let go and fly with things. You cant sue the sea. At least not yet.
Mostly, circumnavigating is about meeting people and seeing things and places. A very good way to spend the short amount of time we are given on this earth.
Well said Capt Mike! I've never circumnavigated nor even crossed the pond, but have lived aboard for over 20 years now and some of my fondest moments are the ones meeting other "boat people". Some like you have done the serious crusing and I've listened to their many stories and others follow the yearly migration along the ICW to points south motoring almost the entire way. I no longer live full time aboard, but every chance I get I'm out there sailing. Some years more than others and I might add I did complete a circumnation of sorts a few days ago. A 44 mile circumnavigation of a small island here on the Cheaspeake. Appreciate your posts.
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post #119 of 159 Old 07-31-2009
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wind magic

great read on the millionaire. I had to save it, and say thanks for posting.......i2f

20 MPH ain't fast unless, you do it in a 1000sq 3/2 house on 10foot waves
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post #120 of 159 Old 08-13-2009
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Thanks I2f.

Here, I think, is the perfect example of why people have trouble throwing off the dock lines - Retired at 38, fantasy vs. reality, an article wherein the author tells the youngster that 900k$us simply isn't enough money to retire on, why ? Because the author assumes that the young person won't be able to reduce their expenses enough to live on 35k$us/year, because "unexpected things" might happen along the way, and because the young person won't live a full life if they retire. That is the kind of thinking that keeps boats tied to docks, clinging to the familiar and the safe.

The author even has to twist reality to explain to the young person why they can't make it - one reason is apparently because their car might break down and "unexpected things" happen, so you can't budget for your car breaking down ? Or another thing the author said, because the author doesn't think the young person can reduce expenses, so, what, someone who saves up 900k$us by the time they are 38 can be assumed to be living an extravagant lifestyle that is going to be hard to downsize ? Recently I listened to a radio discussion (I forget what station) about a couple who were trying to retire by 45 who were both riding bicycles 20+ miles to work to save their money, I'm not so sure they'd have a problem living on 35k$us/year. They weren't exactly living large, in fact the point of the discussion was about whether it was worth it to suffer for decades just to retire early.

Settlers who wanted to move west could never have settled with that kind of thinking. Many people went west by working in eastern cities and saving up their own grubstake and then setting off for the unknown with whatever equipment they had in their wagon - sure, they could have stayed in the cities and kept working, kept saving up, year after year, planning for every contingency, every possible emergency, but the west would have never been settled that way. At some point the settler simply had to say "enough", and leave.

I think people who set off to go cruising for extended periods of time (or for the rest of their days) have a lot of pressure on them to stay safe and to stay tied to the dock. To quote the author of the article mentioned above, "After all, even Thoreau's experiment with bare-bones living lasted only a little over two years" (supporting his conclusion), and that's societies message to you - you'll never make it, stay home with your feet near the warm fire where it is safe, don't be different, and don't you dare untie those lines. Edit - one thing is certain, setting off to go cruising certainly makes other people uncomfortable, and I think that adds to the pressure on potential cruisers to stay at home.

"You can sell your time, but you can't buy it back" - Unknown.

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Last edited by wind_magic; 08-13-2009 at 12:04 PM. Reason: spelling and added quote
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