A Discussion of the Philosophies of Cruising and Circumnavigating - Page 13 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree26Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #121  
Old 08-13-2009
SecondWindNC's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Washington, NC
Posts: 513
Thanks: 3
Thanked 4 Times in 4 Posts
Rep Power: 6
SecondWindNC is on a distinguished road
This is a great thread, and it's telling that so many different people have taken the time to write out their thoughts on it and give their input.

I've never had the experience of sailing off in search of the horizon in my own boat, and I may never get to, but in the meantime, I enjoy every minute I get to spend on the water in boats large and small, and I've been fortunate to have the opportunity to go along as crew on several offshore passages, and each of those trips is counted among my best memories.

Like most, I fall somewhere in the middle of the spectrum in terms of what I feel I would want/need for extended cruising. Things like refrigeration and pressurized water I'd consider pretty much essential; air conditioning and a generator are luxuries I'd like to have, but not so necessary that they'd keep me ashore if that were all that was standing in the way.

Cruising is definitely something that's a matter of personal preference, and it's been great to read about the different ways people have achieved their dreams.

To go ahead and cut down on my rambling, the main reason I wanted to chime in was to point out that EPIRBs aren't just for disabled boats or inexperienced sailors with broken down engines. It's a required piece of safety equipment as far as I'm concerned, and I think most here would agree. When I was 16, I was checking messages at my dad's office while he was out on an offshore delivery. I got a message from the Coast Guard that his vessel had activated its EPIRB, and to call the CG as soon as possible. I can tell you that is not something you ever want to hear. Turns out there had been a medical emergency with one of the crewmembers. She was unconscious and unresponsive, and was only getting worse. The Coast Guard airlifted her to shore and to medical care, and it saved her life. You just don't know what's going to happen out there, and being able to alert someone ashore of an emergency aboard can be the difference between life and death.

Anyway, for now, I'll have to make do with just the occasional opportunity to go to sea. My next boat is more likely to be something along the lines of a Hobie 16 to use for short thrill rides across the river. But who knows, someday...
__________________
Carolina Wind Yachting Center, Washington, NC
Charters * Brokerage * Pacific Seacraft * Zodiac


To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Who is staring at the sea is already sailing a little.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #122  
Old 09-16-2009
johnnyandjebus's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Ontario
Posts: 424
Thanks: 0
Thanked 2 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 6
johnnyandjebus is on a distinguished road
Hello all

Great thread, I will have to go back to it tonight and read it thru from start to finish, as I am just breezing thru it now.

vega, smackdaddy.
I hope you don't mind if I quote you in the future, very well said;

Boat size and safety: To those who suggest that bigger is safer let me just mention "Titanic" and "Edmund Fitzgerald".
Vega

"By the way - I feel your pain, I'm a self-made thousandaire myself."
Smackdaddy

vega I may have to get your quote engraved and hang it on the bulkhead of my contessa 26

John
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #123  
Old 11-05-2009
TQA's Avatar
TQA TQA is offline
Bombay Explorer 44
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Posts: 2,590
Thanks: 0
Thanked 47 Times in 43 Posts
Rep Power: 6
TQA is on a distinguished road
What a great thread. I feel reluctant to add my ramblings to it but here goes.

Disclosure I am 62 years old retired and have been sailing dinghies since I was 15. At the age of 39 I bought a 22 foot trailor sailor and sailed it around the West coast of Scotland and down the Adriatic the following year. At 43 I was lucky enough to be in a position to take an extended sabbatical and cruised the North Atlantic and Caribbean for 7 years on a 38 foot steel boat costing £15,000 [It was a lucky find and a good buy] and a annual kitty of £5,000. I am just about to set off again on my forever boat.

Over the years I met many people on a huge variety of boats, nearly everybody was having a good time. The size of the boat did not matter.

But I did meet a few who were flying home, leaving their shattered dreams behind them and the boat for sale. Their boats were often large, full of gadgets and their owners relied on shore based maintenance services. Sometimes they had had a big fright, some realised they just had bought too much boat and some found they could not cope with that peculiar Caribbean concept often called "Island time".

My first two cruising boats taught me to be self reliant, to avoid having anything essential that I could not maintain myself, that repair manuals, tools and basic materials like sailcloth, aluminum sheet, gasket material and threaded rod were more important than perfect brightwork, a teak deck and a perfect holly splined cabin sole.

I devoured stories of cruisng boats from Swallows and Amazons to the Hiscocks. They were amongst the first cruising couples, their first offshore trip taking them to the Azores and back before setting of on 17 years of "Wandering" and two circumnavigations.

Quote:
The Hiscocks did not go to sea to experience hair-raising adventures. All of their voyages were carefully planned and flawlessly executed, with few surprises, and in the proper way for a middle-aged British couple seeking only personal tranquillity and the freedom of long ocean passages. In their quiet and competent way, without the fanfare of a Chichester or a Blyth, they came to epitomize, perhaps more than any yachtsmen in British history, the proper seagoing citizen.
Eric Hiscock disapproved of EPIRBS SSB etc saying if you choose to go offshore you should not rely on people coming to rescue at the risk of their lives if something goes wrong. I admire his resolve but did have an EPIRB and SSB and a liferaft on my 7 year wanderings around the Atlantic basin. I never needed them but my mother was glad I had them.

For my part I was glad I had a steel boat on two occasions the first when a whale played chicken with us for 4 hours, the second when we hit something big at night. While I did not have insurance I did have oversize ground tackle and a 100 lb storm anchor. I only deployed it once and it took me 7 hours of back breaking labour to recover it. I finally got around to fixing the anchor windlass after that.

If I could afford a brand new properly painted steel boat I would have another tin job with an Amel Super Maramu a close second [only 2 mil]. But a tough "old shoe" in fibreglass is my choice for my forever boat. I will make sure I can get to all the fittings and that nothing is hidden behind a fibreglass panel needing a sawsall to gain access.

I used a sextant in the past but GPS is great, If the boat comes with an electronic chart device I will keep it but paper charts are essential IMHO and I like to keep a running plot of our position on an hourly basis.

One thing that I added in my second years cruising was a powerfull hand held spotlight for the odd night time encounter with a strange boat. I will have another and make sure it is driven directly off 12 volts with a back up battery job.

Wherever possible everything will run off 12 volts and will be chosen for low current drain. Efficient refrigeration, LED lights etc. I shall have enough solar and maybe a little Honda 2 kw genny.

In the end of the day seamanship matters more than the boat and a positive mental attitude overcomes many shortcomings. I loved the story of the £200 millionaire as the sunset is the same regardless of the boat.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #124  
Old 11-06-2009
Cruisingdad's Avatar
Best Looking MALE Mod
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Washington State
Posts: 9,904
Thanks: 3
Thanked 108 Times in 53 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough Cruisingdad is a jewel in the rough
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
What a great thread. I feel reluctant to add my ramblings to it but here goes.

Disclosure I am 62 years old retired and have been sailing dinghies since I was 15. At the age of 39 I bought a 22 foot trailor sailor and sailed it around the West coast of Scotland and down the Adriatic the following year. At 43 I was lucky enough to be in a position to take an extended sabbatical and cruised the North Atlantic and Caribbean for 7 years on a 38 foot steel boat costing £15,000 [It was a lucky find and a good buy] and a annual kitty of £5,000. I am just about to set off again on my forever boat.

Over the years I met many people on a huge variety of boats, nearly everybody was having a good time. The size of the boat did not matter.

But I did meet a few who were flying home, leaving their shattered dreams behind them and the boat for sale. Their boats were often large, full of gadgets and their owners relied on shore based maintenance services. Sometimes they had had a big fright, some realised they just had bought too much boat and some found they could not cope with that peculiar Caribbean concept often called "Island time".

My first two cruising boats taught me to be self reliant, to avoid having anything essential that I could not maintain myself, that repair manuals, tools and basic materials like sailcloth, aluminum sheet, gasket material and threaded rod were more important than perfect brightwork, a teak deck and a perfect holly splined cabin sole.

I devoured stories of cruisng boats from Swallows and Amazons to the Hiscocks. They were amongst the first cruising couples, their first offshore trip taking them to the Azores and back before setting of on 17 years of "Wandering" and two circumnavigations.



Eric Hiscock disapproved of EPIRBS SSB etc saying if you choose to go offshore you should not rely on people coming to rescue at the risk of their lives if something goes wrong. I admire his resolve but did have an EPIRB and SSB and a liferaft on my 7 year wanderings around the Atlantic basin. I never needed them but my mother was glad I had them.

For my part I was glad I had a steel boat on two occasions the first when a whale played chicken with us for 4 hours, the second when we hit something big at night. While I did not have insurance I did have oversize ground tackle and a 100 lb storm anchor. I only deployed it once and it took me 7 hours of back breaking labour to recover it. I finally got around to fixing the anchor windlass after that.

If I could afford a brand new properly painted steel boat I would have another tin job with an Amel Super Maramu a close second [only 2 mil]. But a tough "old shoe" in fibreglass is my choice for my forever boat. I will make sure I can get to all the fittings and that nothing is hidden behind a fibreglass panel needing a sawsall to gain access.

I used a sextant in the past but GPS is great, If the boat comes with an electronic chart device I will keep it but paper charts are essential IMHO and I like to keep a running plot of our position on an hourly basis.

One thing that I added in my second years cruising was a powerfull hand held spotlight for the odd night time encounter with a strange boat. I will have another and make sure it is driven directly off 12 volts with a back up battery job.

Wherever possible everything will run off 12 volts and will be chosen for low current drain. Efficient refrigeration, LED lights etc. I shall have enough solar and maybe a little Honda 2 kw genny.

In the end of the day seamanship matters more than the boat and a positive mental attitude overcomes many shortcomings. I loved the story of the £200 millionaire as the sunset is the same regardless of the boat.
Nice post.

Brian
__________________
Sailnet Moderator



1987 Tayana Vancouver 42, Credendo Vides, (Mom and Pops boat, F/T Mobile Live Aboards in Puget Sound)

My Website:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow My Blog at:
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.


Follow me on Facebook:

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #125  
Old 12-28-2009
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 1
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
hohulpho is on a distinguished road
I accept with information:
1) Autopilot. If youa re going to do any long distance sailing, I cannot imagine going without a windvane or autopilot (the latter having both its positives and negatives). I believe one of the two is a must. A windvane is prefered by many offshore sailors as it requires no power and does better in storms. The autopilot is preferred by many because it account for XTE and interfaces with a Chartplotter to make passages a breeze. They each have their positives and negatives, not to mention costs.

2) EPIRB. Don't leave home without it.

3) Solar/Wind generation. You are required to run lights at night, your electronics draw considerable power, even the bilge pump will pull 5 amps/day. Since most boats are limited in their capacity to incorporate many batteries (with 2-4-D's being typical), you have about 24-48 hours max without power regeneration of some type. Solar and wind can vastly increase the amount of time away from mechanical power generation. We did not have solar or wind on our 380, but we had a diesel generator. Solar is better - much better.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #126  
Old 01-01-2010
NICHOLSON58's Avatar
Mark on Camper 58
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Grand Rapids Michigan
Posts: 198
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 6
NICHOLSON58 is on a distinguished road
Simple answer is circumnavigation is what happens when you cruise far enough.

If your bucket list includes enough places you will have to follow certain well-traveled routs. Read Jimmy Cornell's "WORLD CRUISING ROUTS". You will by necessity be pushed seasonally to make certain way points and to avoid major storm zones by time of year. You can certainly hop off that train for a spin of the planet or two but you still need to get out of the way of the Hurricanes, cyclones, typhoons.

Nice lists above by the way. I'm not sure of the order but these are the musts:
sextant & paper maps
life raft, EPIRB, manual water maker
water maker
lots of tankage both fuel and water
SSB, Pactor modem & printer
VHS (we have one on deck and one at the Nav station and a hand held)
Dink with enough HP to pull the boat to safety
Bimini or pilot house
self steer wind & Autopilot
solar and wind generation
Fridge & Freezer
Chart plotter
Radar
Plenty of good ground tackle. We presently carry 4 different anchors and 300 ft of chain on the primary. I am considering adding a ROCNA 55 KG

I've sailed since I was 10 on dozens of boats from boards through 45 footers. I raced for over 25 years on a variety of boats and very successfully with the same crew for 18 years. I highly recommend a long stay with a good crew of close friends. We are now making plans to retire and my Dear Wife suggested we find a boat large enough for comfort and safety and see the snow less places. We bought a hurricane damaged Camper & Nicholson 58 ketch and are three years into restoration. Hope to launch in the spring in Muskegon, Michigan. We will sail the Great Lakes for a few years to learn our boat in "friendly waters". We will exit the St Lawrence to the North Atlantic and turn right only according to the admiral, my DW.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #127  
Old 01-01-2010
Jim H's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: London, UK
Posts: 594
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 9
Jim H is on a distinguished road
In the go small, go now category

Not that the 'go small, go now" category works for everyone, but I still enjoy hearing reports of such voyages.

You might find the final video installment of this journey interesting:

YouTube - Onkudu, part 17, Final

Basically, he's a young man with a small 21 foot Corribee pocket cruiser (The Unified Corribee Website) who took off in 2008 down the Thames to visit a relative on the southern coast of England. He found the adventure so engaging that he decided to continue the trip around Britain itself. (Having just read two books on this type of goal, I can assure you it isn't easy. Ellen MacArthur did it in a Corribee in 1995.)

Life and luck intervened, with piles of help from others along the way, but you should see the video to see how things turned out. In fact, there are 17 different videos about the voyage on youtube, if you are that interested.
__________________
Jim H
London, UK

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Aurora, a mighty Cal 20 (Portland, OR)
Southern Rival, a seasoned Rival 34 (Gosport, UK)

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #128  
Old 01-01-2010
Lendow's Avatar
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Location: Stratford On
Posts: 36
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Lendow is on a distinguished road
I think the reality is you do what you want and are capable to do. The boat can be well prepaired but realy I think 75% of sailing is the sailor's skills. Why not go where you want to go and enjoy life. Who cares if you make it around or not. I agree, a stop in Ireland and Azores etc would be great but I do not have to circumnavigate this planet. For those who feel they need to by all means knock yourself out. But don't do it for records or glory do it because you want to see the world.

To all Happy new year and safe cruising.

Cheers Len
igorkiporouk likes this.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #129  
Old 01-05-2010
chall03's Avatar
No longer on Sailnet
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: Sydney
Posts: 1,513
Thanks: 14
Thanked 21 Times in 18 Posts
Rep Power: 12
chall03 will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by TQA View Post
What a great thread. I feel reluctant to add my ramblings to it but here goes.

Disclosure I am 62 years old retired and have been sailing dinghies since I was 15. At the age of 39 I bought a 22 foot trailor sailor and sailed it around the West coast of Scotland and down the Adriatic the following year. At 43 I was lucky enough to be in a position to take an extended sabbatical and cruised the North Atlantic and Caribbean for 7 years on a 38 foot steel boat costing £15,000 [It was a lucky find and a good buy] and a annual kitty of £5,000. I am just about to set off again on my forever boat.

Over the years I met many people on a huge variety of boats, nearly everybody was having a good time. The size of the boat did not matter.

But I did meet a few who were flying home, leaving their shattered dreams behind them and the boat for sale. Their boats were often large, full of gadgets and their owners relied on shore based maintenance services. Sometimes they had had a big fright, some realised they just had bought too much boat and some found they could not cope with that peculiar Caribbean concept often called "Island time".

My first two cruising boats taught me to be self reliant, to avoid having anything essential that I could not maintain myself, that repair manuals, tools and basic materials like sailcloth, aluminum sheet, gasket material and threaded rod were more important than perfect brightwork, a teak deck and a perfect holly splined cabin sole.

I devoured stories of cruisng boats from Swallows and Amazons to the Hiscocks. They were amongst the first cruising couples, their first offshore trip taking them to the Azores and back before setting of on 17 years of "Wandering" and two circumnavigations.



Eric Hiscock disapproved of EPIRBS SSB etc saying if you choose to go offshore you should not rely on people coming to rescue at the risk of their lives if something goes wrong. I admire his resolve but did have an EPIRB and SSB and a liferaft on my 7 year wanderings around the Atlantic basin. I never needed them but my mother was glad I had them.

For my part I was glad I had a steel boat on two occasions the first when a whale played chicken with us for 4 hours, the second when we hit something big at night. While I did not have insurance I did have oversize ground tackle and a 100 lb storm anchor. I only deployed it once and it took me 7 hours of back breaking labour to recover it. I finally got around to fixing the anchor windlass after that.

If I could afford a brand new properly painted steel boat I would have another tin job with an Amel Super Maramu a close second [only 2 mil]. But a tough "old shoe" in fibreglass is my choice for my forever boat. I will make sure I can get to all the fittings and that nothing is hidden behind a fibreglass panel needing a sawsall to gain access.

I used a sextant in the past but GPS is great, If the boat comes with an electronic chart device I will keep it but paper charts are essential IMHO and I like to keep a running plot of our position on an hourly basis.

One thing that I added in my second years cruising was a powerfull hand held spotlight for the odd night time encounter with a strange boat. I will have another and make sure it is driven directly off 12 volts with a back up battery job.

Wherever possible everything will run off 12 volts and will be chosen for low current drain. Efficient refrigeration, LED lights etc. I shall have enough solar and maybe a little Honda 2 kw genny.

In the end of the day seamanship matters more than the boat and a positive mental attitude overcomes many shortcomings. I loved the story of the £200 millionaire as the sunset is the same regardless of the boat.
TQA Sorry I missed your post until now, thankyou for taking the time to add your two cents, as someone trying to embark on the cruising life your post was like pure gold!

Good luck with future endeavors on your 'forever boat'.
__________________
* No longer on Sailnet. Reach me by PM.

'Life is either a daring adventure or nothing' - Helen Keller



To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #130  
Old 01-05-2010
bloodhunter's Avatar
ex-Navy
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Baltimore
Posts: 224
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
bloodhunter is on a distinguished road
Lightbulb Why We Cruise

Like many others, Iíve been reading this thread with great enjoyment but have been hesitant about adding to it Ė I mean what can I write that hasnít already been said better.
But here I sit, its 21 degrees with snow flurries; thereís half a gale blowing outside, what better time to muse about sailing. So letís break out the rum and start outÖ
Iíve been sailing since I was five, thatís 62 years now. I started with Penguins and wended my way up to my current boat Ė Enchantress. Iíve enjoyed racing starting with a Snipe hull #1849 which I naturally named Gold Rush to a C&C 40 , Satisfaction. Iíve owned 4 ľ big boats ranging through a steel-hulled 37-ft ketch, a mahogany and oak Dickerson 35, a C&C 40, a Tartan 37C, and my current Morgan 45.
Iíve sailed to Bermuda, navigating with sextant and site reduction tables, up the east coast from the Chesapeake as far as Frenchmanís Bay in Maine and in the islands.
CD , when starting this thread asked about philosophies of cruising, which to me is the question of why do I cruise? What do I get out of it?
I donít want to go all mystical, but on the water under sail, with just the natural motion of the boat reacting to the wind and waves, the sound of the water hissing past the hull Ė I get peace, serenity, and a sense of where I belong in the universe. I need to get away from it all -- all being, television, cell phones, traffic, air and noise pollutionÖ but not people. I could not be a single-hander. Iíll take the boat out alone for day to sail and think but thatís it. To cruise single-handed, I would be missing the sharing, the unity my wife and I have, especially on the boat. Leaving that would be leaving the best part of myself behind.
What do I consider cruising? I used to think of far horizons and exotic locales but not any more. After all, two-weeks gunkholing on the Chesapeake is as much cruising as two-weeks sailing to Bermuda. Hell, a while back my wife and I chartered a narrowboat on the British canals and cruised through western England and Wales for two weeks at 4 mph. It was really great, and we plan to do it again Ė that was as much cruising as sailing Enchantress from Antigua to the Chesapeake.
As for the boat, Enchantress would do very nicely for blue water cruising. She is strongly built with a full keel and she handles a seaway very well. Above all we have found her comfortable to live on for extended periods of time. What would I add Ė extra water tanks, a watermaker and a second solar panel. Iíd also replace all my lights with LEDs. I would redo my survey of my power needs to see what weíd have to give up for extended cruising. And I would have every inch of her hull and rigging checked by a good marine surveyor before setting out and renew everything that needed renewing.
Iím a firm believer in the KISS principle, but keeping things simple does not mean sacrificing comfort. I have no plans to give up my custom mattresses or my awnings and fans. My SSB radio can stay right where it is, as can my chart plotters. My life raft would be refurbished and returned to itís position in front of the dodger. Iíd probably buy a couple of batteries for the EPIRB. However, keeping it simple means id donít rely on the chart plotters as my only means of navigation, or have sails that only can be handled by electric winches, or an electric windlass as the only way I can raise my big anchors. Keeping it simple to me usually means keeping it safe.
But would I do a circumnavigation? Most probably not. While I expect we will sail down to the islands, and maybe through the Panama Canal and then to Hawaii. Once we got to Hawaii I can see us saying ĎWell since weíre already out hereÖí and going off to the Pacific islands and then to Australia. But I donít have any burning desire to circumnavigate and I think weíd be much more likely to go back the way we came. Rather than face the Somali pirates or the roaring forties.

__________________
Sufficient unto the day is the evil thereof
S/V Enchantress -- Morgan 45
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Excellent Circumnavigating Cruising Cat for sale tdreffin Introduce Yourself 0 12-01-2008 10:40 AM
Circumnavigating Budget Tom Wood Cruising Articles 0 10-15-2000 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:28 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.