Freshwater vs. Salt - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 04-07-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 34
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Elzaar is on a distinguished road
Freshwater vs. Salt

Looking at a 25 year old Great Lakes boat online and trying to decide the realities of fresh water, pulled out of the water, etc., on the rigging, engine, hull, electronics before I buy a plane ticket to check it out.

I know this has been discussed before, but not recently that I could locate. The boat in question has 4500 hours on the diesel, and the original standing rigging. It sounds like the boat was reasonably well maintained, pulled out of the water and covered every year. My rule of thumb out here in the salt water would be that the engine and standing rigging are reaching the end of their useful lives. The hull was painted with Imron several years ago, but not sure if that is good or bad. My plan is to sail it locally on Puget Sound/Straits for the next few years, then head out to who knows where. The question is - how much does fresh water/annual storage really count for on these systems after 25 years?

I also read on one thread that the switch to salt will rapidly run down a fresh water boat, but I can't think why this would be any more true on a fresh water boat than a salt boat.

Finally, anyone have any idea what shipping a boat from Great Lakes to Seattle would cost?

Thanks for any ideas,

Elzaar
__________________
"You've come to the wrong shop for anarchy ..." ~ Master and Commander
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 04-07-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
The cost of shipping the boat depends a lot on what boat it is. A Sunfish is going to be far less expensive to ship than a Tayana 52.

I would generally consider replacing the rigging if you're planning on doing any longer cruises with this boat, given the rigging is 25 years old. As for engines... I don't know why you say a diesel with only 4500 is at the end of its life. If it was properly maintained, it is likely to have many more years left on it.

More important than the fresh water use is the fact that the boat sits in storage for six-months out of the year. That means that it may have half the hours on the sails and other gear than a boat from further south. It also means that the hull will be drier than a boat from further south, making osmosis and blister problems less likely.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 04-07-2009
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: Seattle, WA
Posts: 34
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Elzaar is on a distinguished road
As always, the replies just lead to more questions ... but first, the boat is a 40' Passport should be about 26000 lbs. Meant to put that in the original post.

Secondly, I guess you bring up a good point on engine hours ... how many is reasonable?
__________________
"You've come to the wrong shop for anarchy ..." ~ Master and Commander
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 04-07-2009
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elzaar View Post
As always, the replies just lead to more questions ... but first, the boat is a 40' Passport should be about 26000 lbs. Meant to put that in the original post.
More information is generally better than less..

Quote:
Secondly, I guess you bring up a good point on engine hours ... how many is reasonable?
Depends on the maintenance... A properly maintained engine can have 8000-9000 on it fairly easily... a poorly maintained one will be old at 1000.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 04-07-2009
Valiente's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Toronto
Posts: 5,491
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 10
Valiente has a spectacular aura about Valiente has a spectacular aura about
Quote:
Originally Posted by Elzaar View Post
Looking at a 25 year old Great Lakes boat online and trying to decide the realities of fresh water, pulled out of the water, etc., on the rigging, engine, hull, electronics before I buy a plane ticket to check it out.

I know this has been discussed before, but not recently that I could locate. The boat in question has 4500 hours on the diesel, and the original standing rigging. It sounds like the boat was reasonably well maintained, pulled out of the water and covered every year. My rule of thumb out here in the salt water would be that the engine and standing rigging are reaching the end of their useful lives. The hull was painted with Imron several years ago, but not sure if that is good or bad. My plan is to sail it locally on Puget Sound/Straits for the next few years, then head out to who knows where. The question is - how much does fresh water/annual storage really count for on these systems after 25 years?

I also read on one thread that the switch to salt will rapidly run down a fresh water boat, but I can't think why this would be any more true on a fresh water boat than a salt boat.

Finally, anyone have any idea what shipping a boat from Great Lakes to Seattle would cost?

Thanks for any ideas,

Elzaar
Some thoughts: If it's a C&C, have the surveyor check in particular the decks for delamination due to water seeping into the balsa core and going through freeze and thaw cycles. This is true for cored hulls, as well of any type. Have the engine checked for signs of poor winterization.

The rig may be fine, but you are correct in assuming it won't be in salt. Depending on the locale on the Great Lakes, the boat can be thought of as actually 12.5 years old, because GL boats are laid up for up to six months of the year.

Check for brass gate valves and other dodgy stuff indicative of the era. That is a priority, as may be the wiring, which could be untinned house grade Romex or whatnot. Don't be surprised if you find original brown plaid upholstery. The GL environment, while friendly to mildew, isn't in general as hard on boats as is the saltwater environment.

Some people keep their boats ocean-ready. Most don't, because they don't need to. My 1973 Viking 33 is still racing with its original, 36 year old rigging. I will replace it at 40, just because I don't want to push my luck.

Don't expect a lot in the way of current electronics. A lot of people have cathode-ray depthsounders and analog instruments that work because they've never rotted. At the same time, a lot of GL boats are quite dry inside, but their companionways and in some cases their hatches and fixed portlights are NOT adequate to the open ocean and should be reviewed.

The Great Lakes can be as vicious as the ocean, but never for as long, so the boats (except for the racers) aren't worked as hard. So while you may get a "new old boat", expect a lot of renovations, starting with the seacocks and the rigging.
__________________
Can't sleep? Read my countdown to voyaging blog @
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Fresh or Salt Water Taste Test NauticalFishwife Gear & Maintenance 4 06-03-2008 11:04 AM
Water, Precious Water Michael Carr Cruising Articles 0 09-02-2004 08:00 PM
Surviving on Salt Water SailNet Seamanship Articles 0 08-17-2001 08:00 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:42 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.