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  #1  
Old 04-30-2009
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Retirement Boat

I fully realize that ANY boat purchase is all about comprimises and NO boat is going to fully meet the mail on ALL counts. Having said that, does anyone have any recommendations on a 40-45 foot production boat that is (fairly) sturdy, has a centerline berth, and has at least one separate shower stall? The Endeavor 42's fall into that catagory (I think). What else?

I'm looking for a live aboard candidate that is a capable sailor. I'm not looking to go race winning fast, point amazingly high or tack on a dime - on the other hand I don't want a boat that is going to be so contankerous and slow to sail as to take all the fun out of it.

The candidate doesn't have to cross the Atlantic and survive huricanes, but it ought to stand up to extended coastal work and occasional blue water forays (like crossing the Gulf of Alaska).

In short, I'm looking for a retirement boat. Any suggestions?
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Old 04-30-2009
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It would help if you said what your budget is.

BTW, I'd point out that the Gulf of Alaska is pretty dangerous waters...

I would recommend you read the Bluewater boat thread to get an idea of what some good choices might be.
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Old 04-30-2009
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If you are on a budget then look at a well-built Samson ferrocement boat. Very sturdy. If the budget is not so tight then look for an Island Packet.
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Old 05-01-2009
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Sailingdog: we're looking at in-the-neighborhood of under $150K. The problem with the 'bluewater' thread is that it overwhelmingly favors vessels capable of making transoceanic crossings and circumnavigations over ones that have the creature comforts I'm looking for. While a pilot's berth in the main cabin may be desirable for off-watch folks on extended overwater trips, it sucks up space that (my preference) could be better used. Crossing the Gulf may take as long as three or four days but, at least at this juncture, that's the longest I intend to be at sea out of site of land. Most of our retirement plans can be achieved with coastal cruising, watching our weather windows and ducking into ports or coves when it looks like heavy weather is going to be setting in. Point is, I don't need a tank to go into battle with, I need a winnabego to live in that's capable of most anything I am LIKELY to encounter.
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Dave—

Have you considered a catamaran. There's one sailor I know of who has a Gemini and regularly sails it down to the Patagonia channel islands... has some amazing photos of the boat down there too.. some of which are used in Performance Cruising's advertisements for the boat. It might be a choice that is well suited to what you're doing, if a bit unusual.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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Old 05-01-2009
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A few to consider...

Ive been helping my parents find a retirement boat that would meet a similar set of requirements. Ive crawled around on a bunch of boats and the 2-3 that I liked were, in no particular order:

Caliber 38-40

Island Packet 38 or older 380

Passport 40 (maybe a 42?).

All different boats in ways, but well made, traditional, capable, comfortable, and can be found in your price range in decent shape.

IP- lots of passionate owners and boats around. A Modern Full keel-er. Bigger inside. Comfortable at sea and at dock/hook

Caliber-seems a little better sailing boat in most conditions but smaller interior than the IP. More nautical but very nice.

Passports-lots of teak decks, which may or may not be a deal breaker for some. Similar to Caliber in many ways.

Far from an in depth analysis but just a few quick thoughts. Lots of boats out there and a good time to be buying. All boats are compromises so find one that fits your needs best.
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In that size range and price range, I believe, you will be looking at a vessel built in the mid to late 80's. Are you planning on being a full time live aboard. Summer in Alaska then sail south for the winter? Are you a Single-hander or will you have crew aboard.

A few boats that came to mind are

Nordic 44

Mason 43

CSY 44

Whitby 42

Peterson 44

Hylas 42

Gulfstar 44


Just my thoughts
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Dave, I just returned home from delivering a late 80's Tayana V-42, aft cockpit, and I really came to love that boat. This was my first time trying on an "old shoe", canoe stern vintage vessel, and it fit perfectly.
I've sailed on a lot of boats and for the money, that boat was sweet. I think they can be had for around 150k.
Before sailing this boat I was convinced that a boat that would perform in light air, a newer production boat, was the ticket. However, after sailing the "old shoe" in light air I think ventilation is underrated. That boat had what, 8-10 ports that opened, and maybe 6 good sized hatches and I almost forgot the 3 dorades. It always had air moving through it.
I delivered a newer Jeanneau 46 a few months back and I was joking on this trip that I could disassemble the Jeanneau and store the entire boat in the cabinets on that Tayana, including the dinghy! It had a huge amount of storage room, 2-6'2 settees and one that folded out to make a huge double.
I never thought I'd like the wheel arrangement in a canoe stern but you get used to stepping around the wheel.
It had a separate stand up shower and a the galley that functioned well in a seaway.
I sailed this boat around Florida, up the stream and up the Chesapeake Bay and I can say few bad thing about the boat. I didn't like having the tack the gyb around the inner forestay.
Given how much the "old shoes" get trashed on this site I was convinced they were good for ocean sailing only. However, on newer boats like the Jeanneau the only way to move air around inside is to start the AC and generator if sailing. I kept thinking that one of the trade offs is speed vs. ventilation when taking your time and coastal cruising.
I do like a boat with a sugar-scoop but as always, there are trade offs......
I just have to affirm what others have said, and that is that a big old boat over 40' in length is a lot of boat to dock without a few extra hands around to help.
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It'll be my wife and I (although we might enlist help crossing the Gulf, if not for anything else, just for watch keeping).

Likely we'll start in Alaska and sail South. Whether we sail back depends on how it goes...

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Old 05-01-2009
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Retirement Boat

Dave,

I'd definately second the previous recommendation re: Island Packets. They're solid, roomy, rigged for 2 easily and some of the older ones are a good deal on the market.

A friend's parents have one (they're in their 70's) and they get out just the two of them every season. Though mostly for day sails but they practically live aboard weather permitting.

Happy hunting!!
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