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  #11  
Old 05-05-2009
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IMHO The key question is the hull and deck situation. If there is significant water penetration with lots of core rot and or delamination esp. if there is oilcanning then forget it.

Minor blistering or the odd bit of rotted plywood will not stop you sailing. You aren't going to win many [ANY] races but you will be on the water, as most J24 fleets are very competitive with boats down to minimum weight and new sail wardrobes every year.

There is a good thread somewhere on Sailnet about buying cheap boats and getting them fixed up enough to sail without spending big bucks. They may even take less than what they are asking!
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Here is a link to used bits and pieces International J/24 Class Association > IJCA Forums > General Interest > Accessories For Sale

Last edited by TQA; 05-05-2009 at 12:05 PM.
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  #12  
Old 05-05-2009
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Thanks for the responses. The boat isnt TOO far (about 300 miles), I just dont think I can find the time to take a drive at this point in time. To Tommay, if I were to see it in person, what would be some tell tale signs to keep an eye out for? Obviously look at interior rot, see if there is more than pictured. Also, how would I be able to tell if the deck's core is wet? Would the laminate be blistering or cracking in these areas? The owner seems fairly negotiable on the price, but does this boat seem too far gone to use even recreationally? Im so persistant because I simply want to get on the water with something I can hopefully race in the future.
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  #13  
Old 05-05-2009
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J/24 #140 - Renovation

This is the best one i have seen on the work needed on and old hull





Thanks to Rich & Andrea

The BIG issue is that the old hatches LEAK no mater WHAT you do and the boats DO NOT have a SUMP to collect the WATER like the post mid 1980 boats

I LOVE the boats BUT the early boats were a MESS and i have seen a bunch that never got the upgrades which can cost a LOT of money JUST in materials
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If a dirty bottom slows you down what do you think it does to your boat
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Last edited by tommays; 05-05-2009 at 01:47 PM.
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  #14  
Old 05-05-2009
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Some thoughts,
I sailed in college and can not imagine owning a keelboat at that point in my life. Short of a trust fund, keeping a good boat maintained is a lot of time and money and would be behond the resources of most students. This is not a good boat. It is hard to imagine a harder life for a boat than one used by a college team. Most college racing is not on keelboats anyway, and this keelboat will not be competative without a LOT of money. For the amount of money they are asking you could buy a competative used laser, get a new sail, and be racing by next week in a class that probably already exists in your area. The money you save by not storing and maintaining a keelboat could be used to charter one for longer trips etc. Sorry to be so negative, but I sailed lasers for years, including in college, and now that I am gainfully employed have a keelboat. I still have a small boat (laser 2) and love both.
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  #15  
Old 05-05-2009
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If you're going to go look at a boat, I'd recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you determine whether the boats you look at are even worth going forward on, saving you the price of a survey for boats that aren't worth looking at further.

Quote:
Originally Posted by mooseoftoose View Post
Thanks for the responses. The boat isnt TOO far (about 300 miles), I just dont think I can find the time to take a drive at this point in time. To Tommay, if I were to see it in person, what would be some tell tale signs to keep an eye out for? Obviously look at interior rot, see if there is more than pictured. Also, how would I be able to tell if the deck's core is wet? Would the laminate be blistering or cracking in these areas? The owner seems fairly negotiable on the price, but does this boat seem too far gone to use even recreationally? Im so persistant because I simply want to get on the water with something I can hopefully race in the future.
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  #16  
Old 05-06-2009
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You need to ask a couple of basic, but very serious questions before undertaking rebuilding an inexpensive sailboat. (I am currently in the midst of doing my second wrecked boat)

1) DO you have somewhere you can work on it? A backyard, a shed, an old barn? Is it close enough to where you live to go over a number of times every week? (This rebuild will be a loud, messy process which will cause some inconvenience for any neighbours nearby.)

2) What do you have in the way of tools? At a bare minimum you need a grinder, drill, orbital sander, shop vac, and some basic hand tools (screwdrivers, wrenches)? May not seem like much, but I have gotten away with just those and a swiss army knife.

3) Have you put together a budget for the whole project? The boat may only be $2000, but that is the starting point. Every time you go and spend $5 on sandpaper, sanding disks, etc., it adds up. Have you priced bottom paint, lines, hardware? This is a major financial undertaking and the purchase price is the starting point for your budget.

4) Are you willing to undertake recoring the deck? If the core is wet, you will have to cut off the top skin on the deck, remove the rotten core, replace it, and reglass it (or replace the original skin you cut out). MAJOR JOB!

5) Are the bulkheads rotten? Another major job replacing these. Done right, 30 hours work (I am assuming you have never done this and will take a little longer than someone who has done it before) and about $300-$400 in wood, epoxy, and glass. It has to be done right,it is a racing boat.

6) Do you have available time to do this? In your post you state that you do not have enough time to drive to look at the boat. The boat does not repair itself once it arrives; it requires a huge dedication on your part to do the work and do it correctly. Make a list of all the jobs you think need doing, add up all of the hours to complete these jobs, and then TRIPLE this number. That should give you an idea of what is involved. When I bought my last boat, I told the guy I bought it from that it would require 250-300 hours of work. He thought I was just trying to bargain him down, as he believed with 20-30 hours the boat would be fine. So far , I have over 200 hours in and the finish line is not in sight yet.

Please, I am not trying to scare you away from doing this project, but I want you to be aware of the commitment of time and money required to do this correctly. Lots of people like the idea of reviving an old boat; go onto Ebay and you can find a lot of those projects for sale half completed! I think you have to love rebuilding the boat as much as you do sailing one.

Good luck!
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  #17  
Old 05-06-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mooseoftoose View Post
I'm so persistant because I simply want to get on the water with something I can hopefully race in the future.
I hear ya, but trust all of the posters who are describing how much time and money it will cost you to get that thing in the water and sailing, don't even think about being competitive.

For my two cents worth, I'd suggest finding a dingy fleet that races near you. Laser, Albacore, whatever... You should have no trouble finding one under your $2000 budget that will be able to give you that instant gratification of getting you out on the water *now*.
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  #18  
Old 05-12-2009
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So, did you buy it?
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  #19  
Old 05-13-2009
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Still contemplating taking the drive. Ill update as needed
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  #20  
Old 05-14-2009
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J-24

Keep looking the market is in your favor. When I was younger I managed a yard that sold J-boats. I have done many bulkhead jobs on j-24s not too bad to do. Even recoring is not to bad. J-boats are very simple to maintain and make go fast. I did all the prep, rigging, fairing, Awlgrip on Charlie Scott's J27 that won the MORC nationals also the J41 that he won SORC with.
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"For the truth is that I already know as much about my fate as I need to know. The day will come when I will die. So the only matter of consequence before me is what I do with my allotted time. I can remain on shore, paralyzed with fear, or I can raise my sails and dip and soar with the breeze."

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