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  #1  
Old 05-07-2009
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Another first sailboat buyer needs help

Hi Everyone,

I have taken 2 learn to sail classes and i am completing my course sat. I
am obsessed with sailing. MY problem is i have a mooring that is in 4 ft of water. I plan on sailing everyday til it gets old. I am looking at 25ft
sailboats with drafts less than 4 ft. I want a boat that will have decent resale value as i plan on upgrading in a few years. After, I get some sailing experience. I have looked at the hunter and the catalina 25. Im not sure about this water ballast thing. I will be sailing in the peconic bay. I am wary about purchasing an older boat like the o'day. I want a quality boat that will be used mostly for daysailing. However an overnight is not out of the question. There will be four of sailing together.(2 adults 2 children under 10) I just dont know what else is out there. Any thoughts?
Thanks
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Old 05-07-2009
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My suggestion would be to start with a slightly smaller boat (such as Catalina 22 swing keel, 2' draft with keel up 5' with it down.) I was a member of a sailing club on boats from dingy to J-24. I was suprised how much I did not know about sailing after I bought my first boat!
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Old 05-07-2009
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How about a solid wing keel 27ft boat that draws 3ft you won't have to trade out of in a few years?? My O'day 272 is twenty two years young!!

My review...

http://www.sailnet.com/boatchk/showp...cat=444&page=2

Last edited by WouldaShoulda; 05-07-2009 at 12:23 PM.
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Old 05-07-2009
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You said you have a mooring in 4' of water in the Peconic Bays somewhere but you did not indicate whether a trailer boat was important or not. A trailerable boat takes a bite out of winter storage and yard fees if you have the space for it and a tow vehicle.
If a trailerable boat is not a priority for you then you really should consider some of the plastic classics that you say you are 'wary' about like the O'Day 27', Tartan 27', Pearson 26' (Triton?) etc. These older boats with centerboards or swing keels will likely give you better stability then any water ballast models of more recent design. They will also give you more cabin space then any 25' boat which should be a consideration with 2 children. Another added benefit is that these heavier boats will be able to take you farther and handle some of the lumpier conditions that will come up on the Peconics/Gardiner's Bay etc. The winds out there can be fairly strong and the water depths are fairly shallow as you know so the seas can be bumpy.
You should be wary about buying an older boat but many of these old girls were well cared for by loving owners. We got our Tartan 27' from a fellow in 3 Mi. Harbor whose family had taken very good care of her; she is now 42 years old as is the inboard engine. Older boats may require more TLC then a new boat but ALL boats require some degree of TLC, understanding and maintenance. If you are handy and prepared to get your fingernails dirty the older boats are truly a bargain and much better looking then many of the newer designs - IMHO.
The Peconics are beautiful. Get out there and enjoy them.
Good luck.
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Old 05-07-2009
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I'd also point out, most of those classic plastics are going to be far better performing under sail.

If you're curious about the Tartan 27, as a cruising boat, there's a great book, "The Coast of Summer" by Anthony Bailey, which I would highly recommend you read.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

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Old 05-07-2009
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Your Tartan sounds great. However, I need to store the boat in my yard. Hopefully, once I'm in the water my husband will love it as much as I do. He loves his 32 ft Trojan. Here's wishing we wont be a 2 boat family for too long.
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You can store a lot of the smaller boats on trailers, but many need to be launched and hauled using a travellift or crane. I know someone who has kept their Cal 27 in their yard for the off-season for fifteen years now...

Quote:
Originally Posted by rowzee6 View Post
Your Tartan sounds great. However, I need to store the boat in my yard. Hopefully, once I'm in the water my husband will love it as much as I do. He loves his 32 ft Trojan. Here's wishing we wont be a 2 boat family for too long.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 05-08-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rowzee6 View Post
Your Tartan sounds great. However, I need to store the boat in my yard. Hopefully, once I'm in the water my husband will love it as much as I do. He loves his 32 ft Trojan. Here's wishing we wont be a 2 boat family for too long.
So you need to store it in your yard.....and you want your husband to love it too....
He will fall in love with it if it is in the driveway where he can putter around in it anytime the mood strikes, just give him the time and the easy access from the garage where he keeps his tools.

Something trailerable with a class 3 (5000 lbs) tow vehicle may suit your needs if you have a class 3 tow vehicle, many SUV's fall into this category. A water ballasted boat makes it even easier to qualify for class 3 towing since you can dump the ballast for highway travel. There is nothing wrong with a water ballast sytem, it is just a bit more corky on the water than a lead keel boat and you may notice it more in a shallow bay when the waves kick up but you do learn to get comfortable with it, you won't flip over.

I suspect the Trojan is a power boat and that your husband is a power boat fan, if that is the case and you do not wish to be a two boat family there is a compromise available. I own one!
I have a MacGregor 26M powersailer, it is a hybrid, a sloop sailboat with a 50 HP outboard (you can go 60HP or even 90HP) on the back and can serve both sailor and powerboater alike. It has a retractable daggerboard keel and rudders to negotiate shallow waters and with the ballast empty can reach speeds of 20mph with the outboard.
As a sailboat it can sail as easily as most in its' class and you could sail in the 4' of water with the daggerboard half way down and rudders down but that is cutting it close, I have been in water that shallow and it is a bit un-nerving to realize that with only six inches of clearance that the rudders could hit bottom and break. I have the daggerboard line marked at that depth so that I can have it dropped to the same depth as the rudders and it will ground before the rudders hit. I would prefer to just motor out with all fins up to where it is a bit deeper, then set sail. You can get them used for a decent price if you look around, they are very popular among the trailer sailor crowds and they also have good resale potential. The MacGregor is not for everyone but it is worth taking a look at, I quite enjoy mine.
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Old 05-08-2009
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It going to be hard to find a boat that actually sails well if you have to moor in 4ft of water.
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