SailNet Community

SailNet Community (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/)
-   Boat Review and Purchase Forum (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/)
-   -   Boat Shopping - Need Guidance (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/55229-boat-shopping-need-guidance.html)

ballchain 06-11-2009 02:18 PM

Boat Shopping - Need Guidance
 
Hello All,

I'm now in the process of boat shopping in hopes to be back on the water before I dry out.

I hope my questions aren't too cliche' or have been beaten to death on this forum already. I've spent a few years weighing out ideas, and have already been through some of the phases associated with the sailing craze. I no longer have the urge to jump on any old boat and sail the world with the change in my pocket (a phase I see I'm not alone in having suffered). I also have focused more on what I'll be using the boat for rather than what I wish I could do with it.

My goals are to purchase an older boat, between 30-40ft, in the $50k range. I plan on using it for coastal cruising, and may venture further years down the road when I am confident enough to do that. I have even thought about living aboard in the future, as it would put me right in the mix, and keep me close to something I love. I have reserved additional funds for getting the old boat back into shape and upgrading. My experience is low, but my will is great. I've battled many unrealistic ideas, and reading through these forums has brought me closer to earth.

I currently have my eye on an early 70's C&C 39'. The C&C 39 in particular is just an amazing looking boat. Perhaps that is what first got me looking, as well as the prices. I've read all the websites recommended by you guys for C&C boats, I've heard the good and the bad, and know somewhat what to watch for. I just need to know if I'm still to far away from realistic thought, or am I on the right track?

I live in the Houston, TX area, and would keep such a boat along the coast. I hope that someone in the neighborhood has some advice regarding bridge clearance and draft for this ship. I've read 54' mast and 7' draft. I realize this is a big no-no for the shoal waters of Florida and some of the Caribbean, but haven't found much regarding Galveston, Galveston Bay, etc. Any thoughts? I doubt it could slip into Clear Lake, but please correct me if necessary.

I suppose I'll stop here for now. I look forward to your ideas and questions.

Mimsy 06-11-2009 02:28 PM

Welcome. I am your neighbor in the Houston area. We have a boat with a 6' draft that we keep in Kemah. Sailing in Clear Lake is out for us, so we just cruise down the channel the extra 5 minutes to the bay. :) I can't speak to bridge clearances as thus far the only bridge we've had to deal with is the one seperating Clear Lake and the Bay. There have been no issues for us and we need 60' clearance.

I haven't looked at a C&C in person, but they do look the business as they say. There are lots of great boats in your size range and close to your price range that we inspected. If you decide to look at other boats, tell me what your must haves are and I can perhaps give you a lead on ones that we have seen personally.

ballchain 06-11-2009 02:48 PM

Howdy Mimsy!

Thanks for the reply.

I had a boat with a 4' draft at Watergate, and even then was cautious about getting into Clear Lake, partially because the Depth Finder would alarm way too much unless I stuck specifically to the high traffic areas. I'm assuming it's because of the silting issues I've heard about. Your mention of being in Kemah with 6' is a relief.

I am always open to other boats, as I am just beyond the point of preliminary, but not dedicated to any one design yet. Advice, leads, etc are always welcome.

jgsteven 06-11-2009 02:55 PM

Older boats
 
Hello! First of all, good luck on your search.

Two bits of advice from having searched for and purchased a boat of similar vintage recently (although slightly smaller at 32'):

1. Seller's Pricing for early 1970s era boats seems almost totally random, there are some really overpriced pieces of junk, and really inexpensive gems out there. Don't assume a boat is better or worse because of its price (especially if you are looking to buy from the owner rather than a broker, as I was).

2. Buy below your budget and leave the extra money in the refit kitty. Owning a large boat is really more expensive than you probably think it is (certainly than I thought -- and I did try to do my homework beforehand!). This will be easier to manage if you buy lower than your max.

Regards,

--
Joe

Mimsy 06-11-2009 03:04 PM

This one was a dark horse contender for us.
1980 Pearson 424 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

She is a little rough cosmetically and she is a bit larger than your target range BUT if you are looking for something you can live aboard, there is a lot to like about this boat. You would probably want to update the running rigging, didn't really closely inspect the standing rigging. I do know the seller is very motivated, so don't let the asking price freak you out just yet. You might need to come up a little on your target price range but only you can decide if that is of value to you.

I really did like this boat- a lot. She just needed a bit more time for outfitting than we had.

If you need a surveyor rec, see my blog. I just posted a love letter about our surveyor. My husband is the most persnickety engineer you can inagine and he has nothing but respect for our surveyor.

I'll pm you with more info...

ballchain 06-11-2009 03:14 PM

Hey Joe,

Thanks for the advice. I agree that pricing is random... I've seen outrageous price ranges for similar models, and of course, most people seem to be a little too proud of their ship, and expect top-dollar for a $0.50 rag. I hope (especially with guidance and advice from others) to go about this correctly, and end up with something that doesn't leave me 'boat poor'.

I do plan on buying below my allotted budget for purchase price, even though temptation to push it is every where. Refitting and updating is a priority for the long term, and I will have a fund specifically for this. I feel that previous hobbies I've had all tended to be a bit on the expensive side, but this sailing thing has the benefit of saving money should I eventually live aboard.

Thanks again for the advice!

ballchain 06-11-2009 03:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mimsy (Post 495239)
This one was a dark horse contender for us.
1980 Pearson 424 Sail Boat For Sale - www.yachtworld.com

Nice looking boat! Proabably out of my range, but still another idea.

cnc33voodoo 06-11-2009 04:14 PM

Before you jump into anything....
Whats the biggest boat YOU have sailed on your own and how much experience do you and your crew have?
Why do I ask?, because ive seen people jump into boats that size because of what they want in a boat (because of some "dream" they had) instead of what they can actually handle.
These boats end up never leaving the dock if there is so much as a cloud in the sky and become bird nests.
Also, I would familiarize yourself with what things cost on a 39 foot boat ie; sails,furling,engine overhaul,glass work,rigging etc...minor and major (things happen)
Call around to get an idea because any boat from the 70's will eventually need it.
My boat is a 76 and did very well on its survey when I bought it two years ago.I have put enough money in her in the last two years to buy another one and I still have more to go before its the way I want it.Worth every penny because of what I paid for the boat and sentimental reasoning but worth mentioning.
The c&c 39 was a well built safe boat thats quick and points well but who knows what may have happened in the last 30+ years.Get a good surveyor.
I wish you the best of luck on your search.

ballchain 06-11-2009 04:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cnc33voodoo (Post 495276)
Before you jump into anything....
Whats the biggest boat YOU have sailed on your own and how much experience do you and your crew have? Why do I ask?, because ive seen people jump into boats that size because of what they want in a boat (because of some "dream" they had) instead of what they can actually handle. These boats end up never leaving the dock if there is so much as a cloud in the sky and become bird nests.

25' is the largest sailboat I've personally sailed. I fully understand that this is a sight shorter than what I'm shopping for, but I feel that in order to get experience, I need to actually get on something larger. Sticking my thumb out in the breeze hoping to hitch a ride on someone else's boat has me spending too much time on the shore. Are some of the boats I'm shopping for too much for me to dive into trying to single-hand right out of the box? Yes. That doesn't mean I lack the ability to learn, or the confidence that I'll eventually get comfortable with it. Prior to that 25 footer, I had 0 experience at the helm of any sailboat. I realize that I have a whole lot to learn, but that didn't stop me from getting out there and to single-handedly squeeze all I could out of that thing, and walk away wanting more. I'll approach a much larger boat in a different way of course, but a dock queen she will not be.



Quote:

Originally Posted by cnc33voodoo (Post 495276)
Also, I would familiarize yourself with what things cost on a 39 foot boat ie; sails,furling,engine overhaul,glass work,rigging etc...minor and major (things happen) Call around to get an idea because any boat from the 70's will eventually need it.

This is actually one of my main concerns, and why I'll be holding over a fund specifically for such issues. If I move aboard, then that would free up a good amount for the fund. Previous hobbies (racing cars, motorcycles, flying airplanes, etc) all had ungodly high costs for little return to justify the expense. Sailing strikes me as a bit different as the return thus far has been tremendous. Plus, air is still free, so at least I save some there. I've checked some pricing for various items for boats of this size, and do see that it can get out of hand really quickly, but believe that if I can just get it to a point, then I should be able to better grasp regular maintenance items.


Quote:

Originally Posted by cnc33voodoo (Post 495276)
My boat is a 76 and did very well on its survey when I bought it two years ago.I have put enough money in her in the last two years to buy another one and I still have more to go before its the way I want it.Worth every penny because of what I paid for the boat and sentimental reasoning but worth mentioning.
The c&c 39 was a well built safe boat thats quick and points well but who knows what may have happened in the last 30+ years.Get a good surveyor.
I wish you the best of luck on your search.

Thanks for the advice, and I do plan on getting a good surveyor to check out whatever I end up buying. I'm taking this process seriously and want to avoid too many surprises, so I appreciate hearing from all of you guys.

sailingdog 06-11-2009 05:20 PM

I'd recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you determine whether either of these boats is worth going any further with, and save you the cost of a survey on the real lemons.

:D I would also recommend you save at least 20% of your budget for refitting, upgrading and customizing the boat you end up buying. Unlike cars, most boats need to be specifically customized to best suite the way you will use it and how you will sail it.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:52 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012