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-   -   1968 morgan 30 (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/59439-1968-morgan-30-a.html)

rosskowh 11-01-2009 01:25 PM

1968 morgan 30
 
i have a 1968 morgan 30 with centerboard, the boat feels very solid and i have heard good things about them. i would like to hear some opinions regarding seaworthiness, how far would you take it?????? being well equipped of course....

mitiempo 11-04-2009 08:40 PM

I just posted on your other Morgan 30 thread - didn't know you already had one. I don't think there is a problem taking a well equipped Morgan offshore as long as the hull, rig, and systems are in good order - assuming the skipper is capable. While there are those on Sailnet that would disagree with me I believe there are a lot of good offshore boats from that era that were well built or have known issues that can be fixed. Modern design isn't all better in my opinion, although certainly roomier and more luxurious. And not everybody can pony up the $ for a Pacific Seacraft or something like it. I am modifying my CS27 which is 32 years old for offshore use. Mostly updating systems and I'll be re-doing the rigging and some deck gear in the spring. Remember a boat doesn't have to be large or expensive to be sailed offshore. The hull of yours looks like a good place to start. Where are you? And by the way how did your compression post repair go?
Brian

rosskowh 11-04-2009 11:16 PM

i am in charleston sc, compression post went well. i replaced it with a Philippine mahogany. the mast step and surrounding area feels solid, may be all glass, i dont know. the rigging i believe has been replace in the last 6 yrs maybe, just a guess, the boat didnt get much use until i bought it a year ago. i havent seen signs of fraying and it feels smooth and solid, not dry or over tensioned if you know what i mean. we actually sailed it off the sc coast in january last year, only a few miles offshore for 3 days with a rotten compression post, broken chainplate, no engine and strong winds "20-30knts", luck may have had something to do with it....

mitiempo 11-05-2009 12:16 AM

I think if you are properly prepared you create most of your own "luck". Check the swages for signs of corrosion or possible cracks - most older boats have older rigging - some as old as the boat. A magnifying glass helps. If you don't know whether your mast step is all glass or not, investigate - success comes from knowing your boat inside and out. Old isn't bad, just needs maintenance sometimes.
Brian

Leither 11-05-2009 09:14 AM

I have a Morgan 30 (1971 vintage) and would have no hesitation in recommending her as an offshore boat. This is a pretty seakindly design with good sailing manners (although the centerboard does need to be fully operational to get the best results, especially when sailing to windward). I have read that the cockpit can be very wet in a big sea but, so far, I haven't experienced that problem.

The main issues for me are the poor draining arrangements in the cockpit and the lack of a bridge deck with the resulting danger of water flooding down the companionway. I intend to fit additional drains next season and I just make sure that at least the lower washboard is in place when things get rough!

As others have commented, the main thing when going offshore is to be confident that all your gear is fully up to snuff.

Stuart

rosskowh 11-05-2009 11:53 AM

thanks for all the info guys i appreciate it. like i said, i have just been researching it further because was surprised when i put the numbers together comparing different boats, happy sailing.....


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