Bluewater - 1980 Hunter 33 or 1973 Contest 33 - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 36 Old 11-23-2009 Thread Starter
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I was wondering what that white thing above the sink was. It may be European as I've seen on TV water heaters mounted on the kitchen wall. Most Americans don't have a grip on how really luxuriously we live what with whole house hot water.

Okay, now what is the electronic looking gadget well above each midship berth? It almost touching the handrail on the ceiling, and one on each side?
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post #12 of 36 Old 11-23-2009
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Marti
The white thing above the sink is indeed a propane instant hot water heater. I mentioned it in my post. The electronic looking things on each side are stereo speakers.
I think the Contest is the better boat - first impressions notwithstanding because of the paint prepped deck. I think the Contest has a better basic build, has a better sail selection, but it is older. Like others have said, it would depend on survey but if the Contest had no major issues I would think it the better choice.
I didn't read that the Hunter had cruised the Caribbean. Did the owner write the ad? He should work for a New York ad agency! He did make one mistake - the battery for the Yanmar is a group 24 12 volt battery but he has it listed as a 24 volt battery.
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post #13 of 36 Old 11-23-2009 Thread Starter
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The Hunter

I spoke with the guy on the phone today. Part of me really wants his radar, Bimini, "spare outboard power", freezer, frig, scuba gear, furling jib, 5 house batteries, solar and mascerator. He's even throwing in the pots and pans!

I'll want the solar, wind generator, frig, mascerator and maybe the scuba gear. Who know what expensive chart chips he has. I wish I could strip his and put the stuff on the Contest.

But what good is it if the Hunter starts coming apart due to "meets industry standards" construction. It's like having a loaded chevy vs. a basic BMW, I guess.

I really would like more people to wheigh in on the subject, maybe tomorrow, and see if there is anyone out there who whould prefer the build of the Hunter. If it's a no contest so be it!
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post #14 of 36 Old 11-23-2009
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Do not quote me on this, but is the 1980 version Hunter still one of the Cheribuni one? if so, those are pretty seaworth, and worth taking a gander at. A 38' cutter on my dock has been from seattle to mexico and back, 3 times, twice on its own hull, and once via truck, may go back again via truck. ONLY because the owner and spouse do not want to sail at there 60 something age. they have owned the boat since new in 78 or there abouts!?!?!?!

Personally, those that I know that have Hunters, ALL like them! Yes they may be a chevy per say, maybe more a Kia or equal. but they do go forward more or less. Choose carefully! SOunds like the Hunter can cruise and gets from place to place!

marty

She drives me boat,
I drives me dinghy!
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post #15 of 36 Old 11-23-2009
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marti972 View Post
I spoke with the guy on the phone today. Part of me really wants his radar, Bimini, "spare outboard power", freezer, frig, scuba gear, furling jib, 5 house batteries, solar and mascerator. He's even throwing in the pots and pans!
Is this your first boat purchase? If not you've probably gotten this advice before. Don't pick based on the accessories: pick a boat for the things you can't easily upgrade: hull and engine first, then rig, then the rest.

s/v Laelia - 1978 Pearson 365 ketch
s/v Essorant - 1972 Catalina 27
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post #16 of 36 Old 11-24-2009
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I agree with Adam. As far as I know it is a Cherubini designed Hunter, at least the other 1980 33' Hunter on Yachtworld is. I still think the Contest is a better boat but a lot would depend on condition and upkeep over the years. Pictures do lie - either a survey or a real good look by an experienced amateur would be required before making a decision on either in my opinion. I say experiences amateur because many wouldn't want to pay for a survey at these selling prices. I'd do my own survey but that's not for everybody. The Hunter is better equipped in some ways but there is a fair difference in sail wardrope with the Contest ahead there and sails are more expensive than macerators and used batteries. If all the gear is top notch on the Hunter and it is in good shape it should be priced higher. There are 3 1980 Hunter 33 on Yachtworld, priced at 14,900, 19,900, and 21,500. What I would ask myself is why both these boats are priced so low. The Contest owner is moving to Japan so wants to sell fast. What's the Hunter owner's reason?
Brian
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post #17 of 36 Old 11-24-2009 Thread Starter
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Not First Boat

No, not my first time at the rodeo. I have a 24' RL (yachts), it's an Australian design built here. It floats in about 2 ft or less of water. Swing keel comes right up the middle of the cabin.

I do understand that I don't buy by the toys, but I'm fuming about having to buy them after. Not much $ left for accessories. Yes, I would prefer it to be solid. I just want it all, on one boat preferably.

Assuming it's the Contest 33, I'm leaving out the GPS/Plotter, I think he's throwing in his old GPS. I have ordered a Gamin Bluetooth GPS for the laptop, it was a real cheap price.

I do want a radar though for safety, what else.

I've played with some really expensive ships radars in my time, always at the dock and I want to see what to avoid, and set an alarm zone. A Krupp/Atlas would be nice, but would move the waterline.
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marti
Unless I was cruising in a fog ridden area (Maine), radar wouldn't be high on my list. Not much fog in paradise. Don't get me wrong, radar is nice, just way down the list if on a budget. Sails are at the top of the list as far as add ons go, on top of a good hull, deck, engine and rig. The rest is pretty much gravy, and in the case of the Hunter how used is it. If my engine was solid and reliable I would describe the outboard as for a dinghy even if it wasn't included - not as back up power. Maybe I'm too sceptical. I think I'd get an engine survey - not too many $ and probably a good idea.
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post #19 of 36 Old 11-24-2009
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A couple quick points here, over the years my family has owned two Hunter 30's of this era (79, and 81) and a Contest that was just slightly older than the boat in question. I know both boats reasonably well.

Although the Hunter 33 is sometimes attributed to Cherubini, everything that I was able to find suggests that it was not actually penned by him. In my experience with the Hunter 33 it was a far inferior design to either the Hunter 30 or Hunter 37 of this same era. In terms of build quality, by 1980, Hunter was actually offering a very high build quality. It was an early manufacturer to begin using internal framing. Compared to many higher regarded boats of that era, Hunter did a good job of engineering its systems and meeting the construction standards of the day. As odd as this sounds, in those days, many companies, even highly regarded companies failed to produce boats that actually met ABYC standards.

It is not that Hunter was perfect, on my Dad's boat which was purchased new, he had deck leaks where the bolts that went through the toerail and hull deck joint were cross threaded and tightened with an air driven wrench. That is a serious problem, but Hunter also resolved any warrantee issues in a reasonable manner. While these were simple boats they were laid out nicely and came with reasonably good quality hardwarfe for that day. Like most manufacturers of that era, they did have some deck core and blister problems, but by and large Hunter's glass work was actually pretty high quality for that era and at that point in time they were still fully tabbing bulkheads into place, which was not as common with other Florida builders of that era such as Morgan or Irwin.

Contests of that era, had a much nicer level of finish than the Hunters but were no where near as well built. Nor were they as nice a hull design as the Hunter 30 or 37, but being on a par with the Hunter 33. The hull to deck joints on the Contest were problematic as they were an inward facing flange located down from the rail, making them vulnerable to damage and very hard to repair. Hardware on the Contest was proprietary junk. The Dutch yards of that era typically made their own bakelite (Tufnol) blocks and winches. The winches were undersized and the parts were not interchangable so you ended up having to take a jeweler's file and make your own pawls and have to adapt the winch handles so that one handle actually could be used on either side of the boat. It was a bad joke. As was the fuel and electrical systems on these boats, keel bolts, and internal framing. What internal framing was used was softwood lightly glassed to the hull, that quickly rotted out leaving little support. The Contest was one of the worst boats that I have owned in terms of oil canning in a chop.

In any event, neither boat is what I would call a blue water boat. Both were coastal cruisers, and mediocre coastal cruisers at that. They may be reasonable live aboard boats and may be suitable for island hopping if you have the right sails and pick your weather window, but neither has the hull form or robustness of construction that I would think of when I hear the term "blue water capable".

Respectfully,
Jeff


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post #20 of 36 Old 11-24-2009
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Beam

All other things being equal (and I'm not saying they are) a two foot difference in beam has to be a huge advantage for a liveaboard.
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