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  #11  
Old 01-28-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
Do I sound envious?
Well ..... a bit, but in this case it's a positive Actually I think I was wrong about the hull thickness. I was posting from memory. My dutch translator says "Thickness skin 4/6 mm .. Last thickness measurement 1993". That probably explains where her displacement comes from.
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  #12  
Old 01-29-2010
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That thickness is typical for a steel vessel that size. 1/8' (3mm) is normal for a steel boat under 40' with the proper framing. And Huisman have worldwide respect as builders. Here's a link to the Yachtworld listing in English.
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Robert Clark designed some beautiful, fast boats including the Mystery class of the thirties and Chay Blyth's British Steel, the first boat to circumnavigate non-stop the wrong way around. Coincidently the designer of my CS27 and Maine sail's CS36 was Ray Wall who started as an apprentice to Clark before joining Camper & Nicholson where he designed the Nicholson 55 before coming to Canada and working for Canadian Sailcraft.
I wish you luck - she looks like a great boat in all respects.
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  #13  
Old 01-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitiempo View Post
That thickness is typical for a steel vessel that size. 1/8' (3mm) is normal for a steel boat under 40' with the proper framing. And Huisman have worldwide respect as builders. Here's a link to the Yachtworld listing in English.
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Robert Clark designed some beautiful, fast boats including the Mystery class of the thirties and Chay Blyth's British Steel, the first boat to circumnavigate non-stop the wrong way around. Coincidently the designer of my CS27 and Maine sail's CS36 was Ray Wall who started as an apprentice to Clark before joining Camper & Nicholson where he designed the Nicholson 55 before coming to Canada and working for Canadian Sailcraft.
I wish you luck - she looks like a great boat in all respects.
With all do respect....can you direct me to the site of a builder that uses that thickness?
I cant imagine anything less than 6mm below the water line... and 5mm above.
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  #14  
Old 01-29-2010
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Steel hulls are regularly built of 10 gauge material. 10 gauge is 3.5mm. The boat being discussed is built with 4 to 6 mm plating. This assumes a good builder - Huisman is one of the world's best. Many hard chine hulls are built in steel (and aluminum) with minimal framing. This is very popular in France, many with lifting keels. These hulls use thicker plating. But a gracefully designed round chine hull with the proper internal framing both vertical frames and multiple longitudinals will be lighter and plenty strong enough. And very fair when built properly by a skilled builder. The Dutch are considered masters at steel construction as well. Here's a link to a materials comparison. Scroll down to steel construction. Metal Boats For Blue Water - Kasten Marine Design, Inc.
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Old 01-29-2010
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I've always been a fan of Robert Clark's designs. He certainly had the eye. I remember falling utterly in love with a 60 odd foot ketch of his way back in the 70's. I think she was called Sir Thomas Lipton and affectionately known as Tea Bags. Beautiful thing. Not that I was ever going to own her, but she was my fancy for quite some time.

The Womboat's steel. A 34' Van de Stadt. I don't really have any problem with the material though in a smaller boat you suffer greatly when compared to timber or glass versions of the same boat. Though in no way do I reget having bought her, I'd never consider a steel boat under 40' again. The advantages are literally outweighed by the cons. We displace a couple of thousand pounds more than the glass or timber versions, none of it in the keel.

That said, as long as you keep on top of the maintenance steel is not overly problematic. A Dremel and a pot of good anti rust gunk (we use Por 15) keeps it at bay though after 20 years the old girl really should be taken back to bare metal and done from scratch. I'm sure if she was she would be good for more than another twenty.

Good luck to you.
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Old 01-29-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kaluvic View Post
With all do respect....can you direct me to the site of a builder that uses that thickness?
I cant imagine anything less than 6mm below the water line... and 5mm above.
Actually I think he may be correct on that. I don't have any specific builders but I was reading the book "steel away" yesterday and they were talking about guages used in yacht building. Evidently older steel yachts had thicker hulls. With newer yachts they use newer welding techniques and hull protection and can build hulls much thinner. Further more even fairly heavy built new aluminum hulls are only 1/4 inch which is 6.35 mm and many yachts including the 1968 33' Huisman I looked at have 3/16 aluminum plate (4.7625 mm) and that's only in aluminum. For steel I would expect the hull to be somewhat thinner. 6mm in steel sounds like a light armored vehicle to me. I can give you the page numbers or quotations from the book if you are interested when I get into work. I'm assuming with larger yachts the plate thickness goes up accordingly. What size of yacht were you thinking of?

Last edited by Polypterus; 01-29-2010 at 09:05 AM.
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Old 01-29-2010
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Re - Photos .... Is that propane tank really inside the cabin ? and is the propane hose really connected with a gear clamp ? - BANG !
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  #18  
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Re - Photos .... Is that propane tank really inside the cabin ? and is the propane hose really connected with a gear clamp ? - BANG !
Yeah I noticed that too. That's one thing I would have to change. I was thinking I could turn the storage behind the cockpit into a propane locker.
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Old 01-29-2010
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Man! Beautiful Boat!!!
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Old 01-29-2010
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Not too fast...

Glancing through the thread makes me want to ask some questions. What kind of sailing are you planning? The cockpit looks to be designed for ocean passages. It's narrow, with not a lot of stowage. It doesn't look like there's a lot of space for spreading out to watch the sunset. Do those slats look comfortable to you? Do the winches still work? When did they stop making them? If they replaced the mast in 2009 why didn't they replace the wire-reel main halyard winch at the same time? Those can be really nasty and dangerous to use, and there's no need for them, with synthetic fiber line available that is thinner (if you want that) and that stretches less than the wire. Where are you planning to sail? This boat is HEAVY, and has a pretty short mast by today's standards. That may provide OK performance on the Zuider Zee, but if you're sailing in a light-air region, the engine will likely be getting a solid workout, often. Is the engine in good shape? I've been on one site where discussions of problems with Perkins (104's?) were banned because they became all-enveloping. Is the apparently ramshackle approach to propane connections the tip of an iceberg?

Though she does look like a well-built and pretty boat, unless the price was really right, I'd be really careful. Paint can hide a multitude of sins, and this boat looks to be carefully painted (and nicely varnished, too). When a church nearby here did some renovations recently, they found that the balcony's supports had rotted away, and that essentially only the paint had been holding the thing in place. Also, as is apparent from Wombat's cogent post, rust never sleeps.
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