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bmacfarquhar 01-31-2010 12:40 PM

1980 Cherubini Hunter 36 questions
 
I have become interested in a 1980 Hunter 36 sloop. It actually looks pretty good - cockpit not too big - looks to be quite fast - not too heavy and elegant design. I am having trouble finding information on the boat and have a couple of questions:

1) I seem to read that this particular boat was better built than most Hunters at the time. Can anyone comment on how seaworthy they feel this boat is?

2) Is the hull solid or cored? If cored should I pass as its 30 years old? Does this boat have a reputation for hull deck joint issues?

3) Engine is down needs an expensive rebuild - can a 13,500 pound boat be repowered with a small economical outboard just for docking operations and sailed the rest of the time? What about sculling it?

4) Is this boat worthy of some cruising say to the Bahamas or is it a dock queen by nature? I understand a lot is the actual specimen itself and that properly equipped and outfitted most boats can do anything.

5) Is this boat reasonable for singlehanding? Again I understand the subjective nature of this question but am looking for peoples opinions...

eMKay 01-31-2010 01:27 PM

1) All Cherubini Hunters were built basically the same, which is to say they were solidly built but also built to a price. The consensus is that the Cherubini Hunters were the best built Hunters. What I have noticed with my 27 is, there is a lot of decently put together stuff, and some areas that need improvement.

2) The hull is solid glass. The hull to deck joint is an L shaped aluminum toe rail, a layer of butyl tape, deck, another layer of butyl tape, and an inward turned flange, bolted every 4". It's likely the same in the 36 but not positive. I have not noticed leaks from mine, everything else leaks, but not the hull-deck joint.

3) No way can this boat be powered by a small outboard, you need 10hp at least to be able to control a boat that size unless you motor around in calm conditions. Sculling it? Maybe with 3 people on each side.

4) absolutely, if it's sound, it's perfectly capable of going to the Bahamas.

5) absolutely, if it's setup for it. They came from the factory that way, stuff may need to be updated of course.

Here is a better place for info on Cherubini Hunters...

The Cherubini Hunters - SailboatOwners.com

mitiempo 01-31-2010 01:39 PM

The Cherubini Hunters have a good reputation and are good sailers. The outboard is not worth thinking about on a boat that size, prop wouldn't be in the water some of the time and if it was mounted low enough chances are in rough stuff it might be underwater. So best to budget for a new inboard diesel and allow por that in your offer (9-12k).

bmacfarquhar 01-31-2010 02:39 PM

I am pretty serious about not having an inboard motor - I can't stand the smell of gas or diesel and I dont want to be sleeping in the same space as an engine. If I was to put an outboard on it it would only be to take it in tight spots out to sea - I love the idea of removing the propeller for more hull speed. I could probably stow away the outboard in some sort of vented lockerbox on deck so as to not have any fumes below. Strictly for maneuvering about the docks what would be the smallest outboard I could get away with? I absolutely detest engines and the burning of oil. I intend to sail and if theres no wind to just enjoy the moment - I dont have the time pressures of schedules. I want to have a minimalist cruiser eliminating as many systems as possible. I am wondering if I should perhaps go for a smaller boat to facilitate my desire to be almost engineless however I find them claustraphobic and cramped. I dont intend to spend much time in a slip at all - anchorages and moores and lots of ferrying supplies by dinghy.

mitiempo 01-31-2010 02:46 PM

Besides charging batteries the engine is useful for a bit more than getting in or out of harbor. As well some harbors do not allow sailing. There is a thread on here where the owner tries to put an outboard on a 32' Irwin and after a lot of work gave up. There's a very good reason you seldom see an outboard on a boat over 25' or so. They just don't work well. An inboard is a lot less hassle in every way I can think of.

bmacfarquhar 01-31-2010 03:26 PM

Well I have a couple of ideas about those rules. First I have the small outboard stowed away for marinas, canals and harbours that don't allow sailing (I also avoid said areas like the plague if possible). The second is I tell the Coast Guard that my engine just broke down and I can't start it for the life of me so I had no choice but to sail. I am a bit of an alternative energy fanatic so I will be having solar panels for the batteries and possible windpower also though I want to avoid noise and hear that wind vanes can make quite a racket. I dont want to put any holes in the boat to mount an outboard there must be some way to put a bracket on without drilling the hull. Wasn't Slocum's spray about this size and didn't he scull it? I dont care if it goes 2 knots or less in the marina and am looking to avoid marinas and spend as much time as possible in remote anchorages.

I am not completely confident I can handle a boat this big with no engine but I am inspired to try - has anyone tried cruising a 13,000 pound boat engineless and mostly singlehanded? I bet a hundred years ago this wouldn't have seemed odd at all.

eMKay 01-31-2010 03:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by bmacfarquhar (Post 565608)
I am pretty serious about not having an inboard motor - I can't stand the smell of gas or diesel and I dont want to be sleeping in the same space as an engine. If I was to put an outboard on it it would only be to take it in tight spots out to sea - I love the idea of removing the propeller for more hull speed. I could probably stow away the outboard in some sort of vented lockerbox on deck so as to not have any fumes below. Strictly for maneuvering about the docks what would be the smallest outboard I could get away with? I absolutely detest engines and the burning of oil. I intend to sail and if theres no wind to just enjoy the moment - I dont have the time pressures of schedules. I want to have a minimalist cruiser eliminating as many systems as possible. I am wondering if I should perhaps go for a smaller boat to facilitate my desire to be almost engineless however I find them claustraphobic and cramped. I dont intend to spend much time in a slip at all - anchorages and moores and lots of ferrying supplies by dinghy.

Like I said, smallest you could get away with is probably a 10hp, with the smallest pitch prop you can find for it. That size boat needs at least 30hp for hull speed, and they came with an underpowered 20hp from the factory. You will have to add a motor mount bracket, and reinforce the transom. The transom on the boat has a very significant slope from the rail to the water so lifting, starting, moving, touching, mounting an outboard is going to be a pain. Maybe you would be better off with a much smaller boat? A boat that size NEEDS an engine, you cannot move it by yourself without one.

mitiempo 01-31-2010 04:36 PM

And your excuses wouldn't work in the harbour I am in either - you would be turned away at the entrance by a patrol boat.

RTB 01-31-2010 04:38 PM

We've had ours for a year. This model was built from 1980-1982, and I've been told by some that they were overbuilt somewhat. I don't know how true it is, but it does seem pretty solid. It's got a hull speed of 7.3 I believe, and seems pretty quick to me. Everything is lead aft, so could be singlehanded. I prefer another person myself, but that's just me.

It has a Yanmar 3GMD diesel, with a whopping 20 HP. I doubt you'd want less, I'd definitely consider going with a 30 HP in the future if the need to rebuild or replace arises.

I might add that the deck is cored, so check it out especially around the chainplates. I have a small area that will need to be repaired on mine.

Overall, I'd recommend it for what you are considering. We plan on doing the caribbean in the near future on ours.

Ralph

sailingdog 02-01-2010 08:54 AM

I'd point out that you will lose a lot of resale value on the boat if you don't have a working in-board. Also, while you own the boat, not having a working in-board will be a major disadvantage for many reasons, including:

No engine-based charging of batteries
No engine-driven systems like hot water or refrigeration
No effective propulsion should you have problems with the sails or rigging, especially in heavy weather
Limits to where you can take your boat, especially since many crowded harbors and marinas don't allow boats to dock or leave under sail.


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