Any 24-28' sailboats with solid fiberglass decks?? - Page 2 - SailNet Community
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post #11 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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I just got a 1981 Lockley-Newport 23 (then became Glochester 23) which appears to have solid fiberglass decks.
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post #12 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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Boy is this thread full of misinformation. Solid fiberglass decks without cores of any kind are extremely rare. Some early boats had plywood cored decks, like the early Cals. Early on the English employed a boat building method that had closely spaced glassed in deck frames (similar to a wooden boat) and eliminated coring (my boat's decks are built this way). Except for a very few examples, plywood coring was abandoned by most of the industry because plywood was more prone to rapid rot problems due to the orientation of the fibers. By the mid-1960's most of the quality boat builders had shifted to either the more expensive and more rot resistant end grain balsa coring. A few manufacturers had shifted to the even more expensive closed cell foam coring.

It was not unusual for value oriented manufacturers to use plywood or aluminum coring in areas where hardware was being bolted, but many of the better manufacturers would simply eliminate the coring and either build up the are with a polyerster resin/chopped fiber slurry or else simply bring the interior and exterior skins together.

Cheap trailerables had limited amounts of deck coring because coring a boat is expensive.

Deck coring plays a very crucial role beyond the tactile. Fiberglass is very fatigue prone and without coring or framing of some kind the decks would be extremely heavy reducing stability and hurting motion comfort, or else would be prone to flexing which would weaken the decks due to fatigue over time.

I know of no manufacturer who 'potted' their fastenings with Epoxy and I have not heard of a manufacturer who potted hardware prior to the 1990's. Even then it was only small shops who potted their hardware and it was generally with a polyester resin slurry. I have not heard of any manufacturer who even claimes to pot their fastenings with epoxy.

In terms of specific claims and specific boats, Almost no 60s and early '70s production boats had solid fiberglass decks, but with plywood laminated to the underside. Some manufacturers used plywood backing plates on their cored decks which may be what the poster is seeing.

The Olsen 30's that I knew had closed cell foam deck cores and not balsa core.

Depending on who you believe, there may have been less than a dozen Tritons built without coring and apparently some or all of them allegedly had plywood coring in the foredeck, doghouse top, and cockpit.

The Hunter 27's and 30's that I knew had balsa core decks with plywood reinforcing where hardware was through bolted and aluminum that was drilled and tapped where hardware was blind installed.

Jeff


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post #13 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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IIRC, the Nauticat sailboats have a solid deck, at least that's what TrueBlue said about his... they're heavier motorsailors though.

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post #14 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
Boy is this thread full of misinformation. Solid fiberglass decks without cores of any kind are extremely rare. Some early boats had plywood cored decks, like the early Cals.
Jeff,
I think there is just a little mincing of terminology here.
I would not refer to the plywood reinforcement that Cal
employed as a core. It was really just plywood laminated
to the deck and sheathed in one layer of glass cloth.
My Islander 30 has plywood with no sheathing at all,
just a fabric headliner glued to bare plywood.
My '61 Cal 20 foredeck was solid fiberglass with half round
stringers.
Also I believe the Olson 30s were built with Baltek core in
the hull and deck.

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post #15 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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I think the smallest Nauticat is 33 feet not 24-28 as the OP was asking about.
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post #16 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sailingdog View Post
IIRC, the Nauticat sailboats have a solid deck, at least that's what TrueBlue said about his... they're heavier motorsailors though.
I helped re-core the rotted plywood deck of a Nauticat 33'

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post #17 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by COOL View Post
Jeff,
I think there is just a little mincing of terminology here.
I would not refer to the plywood reinforcement that Cal
employed as a core. It was really just plywood laminated
to the deck and sheathed in one layer of glass cloth.
My Islander 30 has plywood with no sheathing at all,
just a fabric headliner glued to bare plywood.
My '61 Cal 20 foredeck was solid fiberglass with half round
stringers.
Also I believe the Olson 30s were built with Baltek core in
the hull and deck.
How thin does a slice of bread have to be before it's not a sandwich

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post #18 of 20 Old 02-03-2010
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post #19 of 20 Old 02-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by scottyt View Post
the hunter 27 cherubini boats have solid decks, except they have AL plates where the deck hard ware is, and under the mast is plywood. they are very solid boats
Except that the keels can fall off, tearing a big a hole in the bottom.

Gary H. Lucas
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post #20 of 20 Old 02-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Motti123 View Post
Many of the boats I have been looking at seem perennially plagued by deck core issues. I figured if one model used a solid deck, it might be heavier and less stiff, but more resilient and involve lower upkeep over the long term. I'm very interested in Cal 2 25's right now but have seen and read some horror stories on the web.
not too hard to determine on a case by case basis. Our 1067 Cal 28 is solid except for one patch up by the bow dorade, and a tiny area at some rotten stanchion mountings. Both easily repaired when the boat gets pulled and all the deck holes are redrilled, epoxied and then reset. with BACK palets this time fer hevinsake... I can only wonder what they were thinkin to not put any in place!


The squish where it's gone bad is pretty distinctive. And Maine Sailor has some good instructions for improving small areas that are problematic.

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