Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford - SailNet Community

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Old 02-05-2010
SPC SPC is offline
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Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford

Hoping for opinions on this Passport line from the early 80's (I think). Can't find much from the Internet. These are clearly beautiful boats and they continue to command a high price -- well north of $100K. We have something at Sailnet on the beloved 40, but I don't see much if anything on the 42.

Some questions:
deck construction
tank materials
ballast
sailing behavior
reputation regarding repairs and maintenance
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Old 02-05-2010
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We looked at some Passports when we were shopping. If I recall correctly, the Passport 42 and the Slocum 43 had the same hull, so you might find additional information by going that route. All the different boats we looked at kind of run together now in my head, but you might want to check whether they used coring in the hull below the waterline. I think that was a concern of ours when we were looking at a Slocum 43.
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Old 02-05-2010
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The Tayana 42 is also by Huntingford, I believe, and will be similar as well.. I think CD's folks own one.
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Old 02-05-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SPC View Post
Hoping for opinions on this Passport line from the early 80's (I think). Can't find much from the Internet. These are clearly beautiful boats and they continue to command a high price -- well north of $100K. We have something at Sailnet on the beloved 40, but I don't see much if anything on the 42.

Some questions:
deck construction
tank materials
ballast
sailing behavior
reputation regarding repairs and maintenance
Quote:
Originally Posted by erps View Post
We looked at some Passports when we were shopping. If I recall correctly, the Passport 42 and the Slocum 43 had the same hull, so you might find additional information by going that route. All the different boats we looked at kind of run together now in my head, but you might want to check whether they used coring in the hull below the waterline. I think that was a concern of ours when we were looking at a Slocum 43.
The P42 and the S43 are the same boat out of different yards. We nearly bought one a couple of years back but decided against it due to the cost of restoration. Also known as the Solar 42.

I don't think they had cored hulls though they did have cored decks. Generally speaking built like the proverbial brick outhouse but critical factors are teak decks and tanks. Nothing inherently wrong with either until you come to replacing them. Getting the fuel tanks out can be done by dismantling the cockpit locker but the forward mounted holding tank is another thing altogether. If there are any original deck fittings and seacocks then you will probably want to replace those as well. I did have an original brochure for the Solar 42. If the OP is interested then message me and I'll email it to you.

While we were slightly disappointed that we didn't end up owning one at the time, since then I confess to having become a bit more performance oriented and now don't regret our decision. Although I am a great admirer of other people's canoe sterns/double enders whatever you wish to call them, my preference is most definitely towards a transom stern.

btw...the Tayana 42 was designed by Robert Harris not Stan Huntingford and to my mind is the superior boat as is the Bob Perry designed Valiant. Perry once remarked that while SH did some nice boats there was nothing he ever did that someone else hadn't already done better (or words to that effect). Bit harsh but probably true.

Decks btw were cored not with timber but some kind of rubber/plastic material. On the one we were looking at there was absolutely no degradation of the core whatsoever despite some pretty dodgey installation of various bits of deck hardware.

Tanks (see above).
Fuel (under cockpit) iron x two. Get in underneath them. You will be able to get your hand under the tanks if you empty the lazarette and remove the panel. That is where you will find the rust if it is not apparent elsewhere. If the tanks are original they will need replacing.

Water and Holding. Stainless but of questionable quality. Water tanks seemed OK but the holding tank was completely shot and would be a nightmare to remove. Shower drains into bilge which is far from ideal but once the HT is out you can get a grey water tank in under before you reinstall new HT.

Ballast...iron. On ours there was no indication of any degredation. Plenty of it btw, they are a stiff boat.

Performance...for something as big and heavy as they are and with a relatively small sail plan they sail surprisingly well. Owners I have spoken with swear by them in anything over 20 knots, they get by under 20 but expect to do a lot of motoring under 10. They are best with the sheets eased. Close winded they are not. Fin keel with skeg rudder means they don't much like steering in reverse but thats to be expected I guess.

Reputation re repairs and maintenance is going to be dependent on the individual boat. They did suffer from poor quality deck fittings ex factory but I doubt any of those original fittings would still be intact. Same goes with through hulls, or more specifically the seacocks themselves.

Finally, a fabulous interior. In my opinion better than any of the rivals with two very useable sleeping cabins, an excellent galley, good head with separate shower, proper sit down chart table/writing desk, oodles of storage, very comfortable saloon and the starboard quarterberth makes for a fine seaberth. Without doubt the interior is the boats best feature, other than the bullet proof construction. The cockpit less so. Not sure why but I never really took to it.

Memory a bit hazy after all this time but any questions I can answer I'd be happy to do so.

TD
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Last edited by tdw; 02-05-2010 at 03:06 PM.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tdw View Post
btw...the Tayana 42 was designed by Robert Harris not Stan Huntingford and to my mind is the superior boat as is the Bob Perry designed Valiant. Perry once remarked that while SH did some nice boats there was nothing he ever did that someone else hadn't already done better (or words to that effect). Bit harsh but probably true.
Thanks for the correction, td...that's true, of course, about Robert Harris, and Perry's comments re Huntingford have the ring of truth too for the most part.

Nice summary on the P42, by the way, from one who's "been there tried that".
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slocum vs passport

Actually, all tankage on the Slocum 43 is readily removable without any deconstruction of the boat. The fuel tanks come out through the locker in the aft cabin. That locker as originally constructed was designed to be unscrewed and removed. The holding tank is also easily removed straight up into the cabin. This from experience as I have personally removed all the tanks on Sea Fever. From reading some other missives, such is not the case for the Passports.

The Passport 42 and the Formosa 42 version of the boat were solid layup below the waterline and I do not know the material used for coring the deck and hull above the waterline. The Slocum hulls were cored to the keel using Airex with all through-hull locations surrounded by solid lay-up. Watch out for POs and yard monkeys drilling through the cored areas without laying up a solid ring around the hole(s). I have never seen any problems with the Slocum hulls having water penetration.
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Old 08-23-2012
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Re: Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford

I just bought a 1983 Passport 42 in Florida. It is a lovely boat and in very good condition. I'll be able to contribute more after I sail her up the coast to Long Island. BTW anyone interested in sailing part or all of the way in October. Tips on the voyage would be appreciated as well.

Surveyor says I should replace all the standing rigging. There were no fish hooks or cracked swages (leastways on the deck side) and it seems like an unnecessary expense. Any comments?
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Old 12-30-2012
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Re: Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford

Hello,

I'm new to sailing and am looking for the right boat. May I ask how much you paid for your Passport 42?

Michael
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Re: Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford

Freedom.... welcome to Sailnet and sailing! 'Goodtoknow' hasn't been active on the site for several months, once you get enough posts (15) you could send him a private message - he may still be getting email notifications of PMs.

Good luck.
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1984 Fast/Nicholson 345 "FastForward"

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Capt G E Ericson (from "The Cruel Sea" by Nicholas Monsarrat)
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Old 12-30-2012
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Re: Passport 42 designed by Stan Huntingford

I paid $85000 for the Passport 42 in better than average condition. It is quite seaworthy and suprisingly fast for it's weight and class. Bringing it up the coast we got caught in a Noreaster going around the cape. 36 hours of 30 mph sustained winds with gusts to 60 and 15 ft waves. The boat handled it as well as can be expected with double reefed main and roller furled genoa. BTW the Genoa is now blown out and the roller fuler was damaged by the wind pressure. I didn't have the right sail inventory for the sea conditions.

The floor plan is very comfortable with plenty of storage and my only complaint is the 6"4" draft which keeps me out of some places.

Hope that helps,
Bruce
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