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  #1  
Old 02-06-2010
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Which boat for me?

THere may very well already be something written along this line, but I cant seem to find it, so here goes. This will be my first sailboat over 14'.

My priorities:
A high production, 30' boat, so that the boats and parts are plentiful and the cost is low
Fairly roomy interior
A design that will be somewhat stiff so that she's steady in chop (wife gets motion sick)
Quality construction
A rig that is able to be singlehanded if need be

I am prepared to be told that what I am asking for is a contradiction, but I thought I would take a shot and see what you guys have to say.

PS. I found an older Pearson 30 that is nice, and a Columbia 30 but as I read what has been written on them, I'm finding they dont fit the bill.

Thanks in Advance
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Old 02-06-2010
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Go look at them both. All you loose is some time, but you gain a sense of each boat. If you decide that the Pearson is not a fit after seeing it, you won't waste any more time on them in the future. Checking out boats in person will give you a good sense of what will work for you and what won't

I am quite partial, but I would seriously look at the Pearson 30. There are lots of them out there and some areas still have active racing fleets. There is a large knowledge base of people who own or have owned them. I have had zero trouble finding parts for the engine (Atomic 4) or hardware. Many of them have been upgraded over the years so if the boat is in good shape you will not have to spend money for those upgrades. My wife and I have plenty of room to weekend on the boat. It is advertised to sleep 6. I would say 4 is more like it. You can comfortably fit 4 adults in the cockpit, 5 is not too bad, 6 is pretty tight. I single hand the boat most of the time. Chop isn't too bad, but when you get the short period 1'-2' waves the boat does bounce on them. I find the person who is at the helm is less likely to get sick, so have her steer. Also, everyone has a motion that will get them sick, so do not count on it never happening. The P30 is a light boat and moves very well in light air. Where I sail this is important or I would never take her out. From what I am told of the columbia 30, the P30 is much more spritely. They are also built like tanks. And the best benefit of the 70's vintage boats is the goovey colors the table and galley counter comes in.

If you are in my area and want to take one for a sail, pm me and I will be glad to do it.
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Michel_Latin

Last edited by nickmerc; 08-18-2011 at 06:02 AM.
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Old 02-06-2010
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You might also consider the various O'Day models that were built. Denby has an O'Day 302 that is fairly nice, for a leadmine.. However, it might be a good idea to get your wife out on various boats in varied conditions to see how the motion of the boat affects her.

I'd point out that some people who get seasick on monohulls do much better on multihulls, as the type of motion is very different between the two types of boats. A small cruising catamaran, like the older Gemini 3000 series, would meet your requirements of high production, fairly roomy, stiff and single-handable...

As for quality of construction, on any older boat of the age you're looking at, the maintenance that she has seen is going to count for at least as much as the original construction.
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Old 02-06-2010
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I would suggest looking at any and all 30'ish foot boats. As even some that are tender like my 85 Jeanneau Arcadia can be sailed flat if that is an issue. Where when sailing with my kids, a full main and 140 is fun for us, a reef or two and a 140 or a full main and a 110 is where she is happy in the same conditions. So the "HOW" you sail a boat could be the issue too.

My wife for instance went into a pearson, did not like the interior feel ambiance etc. The jeanneau she liked.

Reality is, look at any boat, be it a Catalina, Newport, C&C, Tartan, San Juan, Beneteau, westsail 32......or the tri's or catamarans too. One of these your wife will like the interior feel, then figure out how to sail the boat to your wifes liking too.

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Old 02-06-2010
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thanks for the input everyone.
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Old 02-06-2010
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Hello,

You didn't list a budget or any other requirements, like pressure hot and cold water, swim platform, walk through transom, AC electrical system, etc.. Knowing some of those things would help narrow things down. If you don't know what you want, look at a lots of boats, preferably with a good broker (that is not a contradiction, although it may seem like one) and have him point our various features.

Is sailing performance more important than comfort at the dock or at anchor? Do you need a shoal draft boat or do you have lots of water?

As written, you have described the Catalina 30 perfectly. However, just about any production 30' boat could be close. In addition to the boats you listed, and the Catalina 30, this includes (from the top of my head):

O'day
Newport
S2
Islander
Bristol
C&C
Irwin
Hunter
Tartan
Sabre
Beneteau
Jenneau
Cal
Grampian
Ranger

and i'm sure there are others.

If you can decided on some features, you can cross boats off.

Good luck,
Barry
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Old 02-07-2010
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again. good leads and advice guys. thanks again.
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Old 02-07-2010
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Bellefonte: PS did a Classic 30 footer review some time last year as I recall. Good article for reviewing layouts and sailing charateristics. From your initial description of your requirements, I agree with Barry - Catalina 30 - would stand out. Very popular boat with decent sailing capability and PARTS! Lots to choose from on YW. The Catalina 34 is a good boat too if the wife decides she needs more room.
Hal
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Old 02-07-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bakerha51 View Post
Bellefonte: PS did a Classic 30 footer review some time last year as I recall. Good article for reviewing layouts and sailing charateristics. From your initial description of your requirements, I agree with Barry - Catalina 30 - would stand out. Very popular boat with decent sailing capability and PARTS! Lots to choose from on YW. The Catalina 34 is a good boat too if the wife decides she needs more room.
Hal
Thanks Hal. Does anyone know where I can find that thread?
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Old 02-07-2010
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Lightbulb And don't forget....

Just a small caution, if I may...
A lot of buyers seem to get hung up on two numbers when they look for a "big enough" boat for the family. These numbers are a "3" and a "0".

Before everyone started hocking their second mortgage for a second home at the dockside there were a host of boats built in the late 70's and early 80's that are about 29' long.
They sailed fast and easily and were really the last holdouts from a time when a boat was expected to be fast in local club racing and then easily sailed by the whole family for weeks of summer vacationing.

Look for a King-designed Ericson 28 or 29 (or a 30 for that matter), a C&C-designed Newport 28, a C&C 29, a Lapworth Cal 29 (or a 2-29). There were the Shaw Pearsons, and the S2 30.
I apologize for omitting some worthy names, but do look for sailing pedigree.

We spent a year looking for boats in the 30 to 32 foot range and were aboard every one on this list and a lot more... (worth mentioning was a great Jeaneau 32 Atalia from the mid 80's).

We finally found a run down longer/faster cruiser/racer that we still have, 15 years later.

Your boat is out there, somewhere, waiting for you....


Edit: Be sure to visit the many different owners' web sites for the various makes and models. Most will be glad to tell you what to look for and explain the differences in model lines.
Of course (!) I would put Ericsonyachts.org at the top of that list...


LB

Last edited by olson34; 02-07-2010 at 04:20 PM.
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