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  #11  
Old 02-18-2010
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frankly, the price made me wonder if something was wrong. It might just be the economy. It does look good. can't see any blistering, very little hazying, rigging is in good shape, etc. i haven't sea trialed her yet or gotten a survey.
But, I'd hate to sail the pacific islands with my wife and 15 yr old son always keeping her by the lee for fear of dead rolling.
I suppose that if I intend to sail to and then island hop in the pacific, I should be confident that I could handle a death roll situation. But, I'd hate to be asleep below with my son at the helm in that situation.
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  #12  
Old 02-18-2010
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I don't think it's the right boat for that kind of trip really. By the time you load everything on board for 3, add water and provisions as well as cruising gear you'll want or need it won't be close to an ULDB anymore. As for the price, I'd guess Contessa isn't as well known a name in California, at least not the 34, and the economy isn't helping.
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  #13  
Old 02-18-2010
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Keeping an IOR boat by the lee is a good way to death roll. If you are really talking about sailing to distant Pacific Isles (and not simply to Catalina) Then this would be a really poor choice. These boats are priced that cheaply because they are essentially obsolete as race boats, very poor cruising boats, and there are few things more obsolete as an obsolete race boat.

Frankly, there is nothing even remotely ULDB about the Contessa 34. These were not expecially light boats for a race boat of that era. A 34 foot ULDB of that era would have been a bit more than half that weight.

I have never heard that Contessa used resin infusion. I think Contessa went out of business before this technology was perfected.

Jeff
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  #14  
Old 02-19-2010
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Alright, I'm fairly well convinced this is not the right boat. the search goes on.
thanks for the info.
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  #15  
Old 02-19-2010
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The Contessa OOD34 was injection-moulded, probably the first leisure boat to be build that way. It was designed by Doug Peterson.
You can read more here OOD 34 Online
While I think JeffH is generalizing a bit too much about IOR boats (the Contessa's built to race that rule are way better boats than other IOR's of that era) he is right that the overlapping genoas are a bit of work. (He's also extremely knowledgeable, so consider his opinion first ).
The 34 is not the best design in terms of stability etc. but some have been cruised far and wide (but that is true for many designs). So for a cheap cruiser, personally I would do it - if you have money for something better suited for bluewater, you should dismiss this (as you seem to have already).

Edit: I just realized that Jeff already gave some of this information -
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Last edited by JomsViking; 02-19-2010 at 04:43 AM.
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  #16  
Old 03-01-2010
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Ood34

Quote:
Originally Posted by attorneyjim View Post
I'm looking at a 1979 Contessa 34 (yes 34, not a 32). I don't know much about this design except that Jeremy Rodgers (sp?) owned one of these and it's supposed to be a good open water racer. The one I'm looking at was stored for a long time and has recently seen just a little bit of use and seems to be in good shape. In fact, the new sails are probably worth more than the asking price of the entire boat.
My main question is this: This hull has ribbing built into it (original build), which is good, however, the process created a deformation in the hull such that the ribbing is clearly visable on the outside of the hull. Broker calls this "beer canning" and claims the survey says it does not effect the performance of the hull. The broker says the effect is only above the waterline but I haven't confirmed this yet.
Anyone know if this is a problem, other than cosmetic? Are you familiar with this design? Anything else you can tell me?
One last thing: this is an ultra light OOD with some live-aboard accommodations. I want to eventually use it for open water cruising. Is this a good choice?
Thanks, Jim
Hi Jim, I owned and raced an OOD 34 for 13 years, and I never found a better boat. This Peterson-Design is still a very competitive performer on the race course, even under the current racing currencies here in Europe. We became vice-champion in our ORC-regionals in 2007, and booked countless trophies in several races in the netherlands and the uk over the years. The visibility of the ribs on the outer topsides of the hull is a common appearance for OOD´s, the british call it the "hungry-dog effect". It is pure cosmetical, the structure of the boat ist extremely solid, thanks to its unique construction method of injection moulding. Using a vacuum for curing results in a super stiff jet lightweight hull that holds its shape even in extreme conditions. Add the benefits of using epoxy-resins, very uncommon in those days, osmosis ist unknown among the OOD 34 fleet. For cruising, the boat might be a bit spartan below decks, but has excellent seagoing capacities, we tested her in several long distance cruises and offshore races. If you are going to race her, make sure you keep the boat light and the rigging pretty tight, the OOD 34 will be unbeatable in medium to heavy conditions, especially upwind. Good luck.
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Old 03-03-2010
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These boats needed a lot of weight on the rail - when powered up for racing. Cruisers don't usually sail that way. They were broaches looking for a place to happen on a powered up spinnaker reach. Cruisers don't do that, either. They also rolled badly downwind under an oscillating spinnaker - another thing cruisers avoid.

A lot of the bad behavior of IOR boats occurred mainly when they were being pushed hard. Cruisers should reef early and often.

I think this would make a great family performance cruiser - nice snug pilot berths for the kids, rig up some lee cloths and they'll be happy. Skip the 150% genoa, too hard to tack anyways. Stick a 110% on a roller furler and go sailing. As a cruiser, you're not really concerned about that last 0.2 kt of boat speed - your slowing down to make the wife comfortable. Great price for a well made boat laid out for offshore sailing.

Try to find bunks that good for sleeping underway on a new production boat. Not gonna happen. The new boats are built for daysailing and entertaining at dock or anchor. This thing is built for sailing.
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  #18  
Old 03-04-2010
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No IOR-Boat

Read a lot in this threat of bad behavior of ior-boats, but it should be made clear that the OOD 34 is not an IOR-boat and truely never was. Right from the beginning it was designed as pure one-design, without a good handicap in mind. So all the ior-features that were responsible for bad habits can´t be found in this boats as hypercritical weight distribution, ior-bumps, internal ballast, small stern sections etc. Indeed the OOD 34 has a rather full underbody aft with clean lines and no distortions. a deep lead keel of 1650 kilos give a mere 44% ballast, wich makes for a very stiff boat compared to most racers ( and cruisers) of that era. Weight on the rail really helps when racing, but for cruising you can go with the No1 genoa up to 18 knots true. Downwind and reaching, she is not the fastest boat around, but pretty steady with no tendencies to death rolls or even cranky behavior.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sahara View Post
These boats needed a lot of weight on the rail - when powered up for racing. Cruisers don't usually sail that way. They were broaches looking for a place to happen on a powered up spinnaker reach. Cruisers don't do that, either. They also rolled badly downwind under an oscillating spinnaker - another thing cruisers avoid.

A lot of the bad behavior of IOR boats occurred mainly when they were being pushed hard. Cruisers should reef early and often.

I think this would make a great family performance cruiser - nice snug pilot berths for the kids, rig up some lee cloths and they'll be happy. Skip the 150% genoa, too hard to tack anyways. Stick a 110% on a roller furler and go sailing. As a cruiser, you're not really concerned about that last 0.2 kt of boat speed - your slowing down to make the wife comfortable. Great price for a well made boat laid out for offshore sailing.

Try to find bunks that good for sleeping underway on a new production boat. Not gonna happen. The new boats are built for daysailing and entertaining at dock or anchor. This thing is built for sailing.
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  #19  
Old 03-04-2010
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But maybe not a good choice for long distance cruising after you load 3000 to 4000 lbs on board. Great coastal cruiser though.
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