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post #11 of 23 Old 02-25-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jeff_H View Post
I would say that 6'-6" to 7'-0" is a practical limit. After that there are a whole bunch of places that you can't get into. I ended up with 6'-4" draft and that has worked quite well. I have also raced and cruised on a boat with 8 Foot draft and that hasn't been a deal breaker but it certainly less than ideal.

Jeff
Jeff, to take this a little further......

As you know we recently decided against a particular boat partly due to her draft being only 5'6" (41'er). The same boat is also available with 6'6".

What is the effect of that extra foot of draft ?

Is the non racing sailor really going to notice much difference in performance and/or comfort ? After all we are only talking about 5'6" to 6'6".

Andrew B

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post #12 of 23 Old 02-25-2010
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Yes, the non-racing sailor will notice the deeper keel, when it goes aground...

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Jeff, to take this a little further......

As you know we recently decided against a particular boat partly due to her draft being only 5'6" (41'er). The same boat is also available with 6'6".

What is the effect of that extra foot of draft ?

Is the non racing sailor really going to notice much difference in performance and/or comfort ? After all we are only talking about 5'6" to 6'6".

Sailingdog

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post #13 of 23 Old 02-25-2010
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Scott,
I've been in and out of Rockhall dozens of times over the last ten years with a 6'2" draft boat without incident. I have a good friend who keeps his 6'4" draft boat at the Sailing Emporium.

On entry - favor the red.

Wayne
I agree with Wayne...on enrty to the harbor mouth favor the red. My draft is 5'6" and isn't a problem 99% of the time. The other 1% I sit at the dock with many others and drink with fellow Sailing Emorium patrons. There are many others with deeper draft than I and they do very well. If you think you're going to end up at the Sailing Emporium check with me or any other sailor that docks there and we'll share some tips about approaching a couple of the fairways. Great place to be and Rock Hall is a good starting point to visit great anchorages, Baltimore, Annapoilis and more.

Good luck with your boat selection.

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post #14 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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Draft for Rock Hall

We sail out of the Sailing Emporium also and have a 5' draft. I wouldn't want much more than that to sail over the Swan Creek Bar using the Brewerton Range light course. If you are bound for Baltimore or any points north of Rock Hall this will save several miles of distance as compared to sailing south to the #3 bouy. The availability of this way of clearing the bar is a piece of "local knowledge" which you won't find on any chart. I have seen boats with 6' draft make it when the tide is up, but I like to go that way without worrying about the tide.

The Emporium is a very friendly place, clean, well managed and attractive. The Admiral likes it and the other slipholders are quite companionable. In two seasons I can only recall one time when we were aground at the slip for a few hours with our 5' draft.
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post #15 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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Exceptionally low tides are something to remember.

They are caused by sustained north winds which can blow several feet of water out of the Bay. Otherwise, the tidal range in the mid-upper Bay is small.

The bottom is soft and do harm is done in the slip, but I have seen boats lean enough to strike masts. Don't cut the slip draft too thin.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

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post #16 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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An element I didn't really touch on in my previous posts, but davmarwood touched on:

Yes, you will likely get better all-around performance with that deeper draft. But if you are sailing primarily on Chesapeake Bay, that better performance may not amount to faster passages between destinations. There are so many short cuts available to shallower-draft boats, that you can literally carve hours off transit times.

A good example is davmarwood's above. Another would be sailing to St. Michaels from Rock Hall area. I'm not positive, but I think with 6'2" you'd have to go down under the Bay Bridge and around Bloody Point and up the Eastern Bay, rather than taking Kent Narrows.

Not looking at a chart, but I'd guess that will add better than 15+ n.m. to your trip and there's no amount of extra advantage from a deep draft that will make up for that. The shoal draft boat will be done with dinner and in bed before you even arrive.

Just something else to think about....


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post #17 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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Short cuts are great

Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
An element I didn't really touch on in my previous posts, but davmarwood touched on:

Yes, you will likely get better all-around performance with that deeper draft. But if you are sailing primarily on Chesapeake Bay, that better performance may not amount to faster passages between destinations. There are so many short cuts available to shallower-draft boats, that you can literally carve hours off transit times.

A good example is davmarwood's above. Another would be sailing to St. Michaels from Rock Hall area. I'm not positive, but I think with 6'2" you'd have to go down under the Bay Bridge and around Bloody Point and up the Eastern Bay, rather than taking Kent Narrows.

Not looking at a chart, but I'd guess that will add better than 15+ n.m. to your trip and there's no amount of extra advantage from a deep draft that will make up for that. The shoal draft boat will be done with dinner and in bed before you even arrive.

Just something else to think about....
A previous poster mentioned the bar west of Rockhall. I sail out of Deale and regularly get to watch the parade of deep draft boats that have to motor ~ 3 miles south around the 4- to 5-foot Long Bar, which shallow draft boats easily pass over.

Shallow draft means you generally only have to watch the soundings when you are getting in quite close. Very relaxing.

Shallow draft often means shorter dingy rides.

(when asked how he reached the starting holds on a difficult rock climbing problem that clearly favored taller climbers - he was perhaps 5'5")

"Well, I just climb up to them."

by Joe Brown, English rock climber




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post #18 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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Very key if you're rowing....

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Originally Posted by pdqaltair View Post
A previous poster mentioned the bar west of Rockhall. I sail out of Deale and regularly get to watch the parade of deep draft boats that have to motor ~ 3 miles south around the 4- to 5-foot Long Bar, which shallow draft boats easily pass over.

Shallow draft means you generally only have to watch the soundings when you are getting in quite close. Very relaxing.

Shallow draft often means shorter dingy rides
.

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post #19 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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As pd and JohnR just mentioned there are what I consider significant advantages to shallow drafts. If you are only coastal cruising I would (and have) trade the performance advantage of a deeper draft for the practical advantages of a shallower draft.

While I do not sail in the Chesee, my area has shoals and some harbors/marinas where a shallower draft allows you much more flexibility and ease of mind when sailing. IMHO unless you are constantly in deep water, a shallower draft is worth giving up some performance. If you're concerned about racing your PHRF rating will compensate you anyway.

No matter what your draft, you will still run aground. You'll just be closer to shore.
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post #20 of 23 Old 02-27-2010
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On the other hand, short cuts usually mean motoring significant distances. If you prefer to sail a longer day all under sail (except for the first and last mile or so) may be preferable to a shorter one half of which is under power. YMMV.

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