Interesting Sailboats - Page 142 - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Like Tree1266Likes
Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1411  
Old 09-10-2011
Chimbatete's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Posts: 169
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
Chimbatete is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Welcome to the thread



I did not wanted to say that the Opium that is built with top materials and with vacuum infusion is fragile. I think that it is a very well built boat that is fit for the intended use without maintenance problems.

Regards

Paulo
What does this mean Paulo? If I get one its definitely to be king of Winward/leeward course and ocassional weekend cruising. Is that the intended use?

But at the same time it seems no worse than a Pogo as an offshore boat.
__________________
1974 CC 27
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1412  
Old 09-10-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Posts: 260
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 6
bb74 is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Thanks BB, nice post and I would say about I expected regarding the boat.

Now what I would like is that next Charter would be on an Elan 350, Salona 34 or First 35. I would like to hear the difference under your point of view regarding a true performance cruiser. If it is a Salona in Croatia maybe I even can get you a discount

I just don't understand that point about the better quality regarding the Dufour. Dufour are more expensive than Jeanneaus and Benetaus (Oceanis) and supposedly have a a slight better quality: Who is going to buy a more expensive boat with lesser quality?

I have sailed last year a new Dufour 425 and the quality seemed OK. I have compared in boat shows the quality of Dufour with Jeanneau and Benetau and don't seem to me that is lower, quite the contrary.

Regards

Paulo
Croatia is probably next so if you know renters for a Salona, please let me know!

On the comparison between performance cruiser and a SO36, there's no contest. Comparing to a J109, A35 or even the Pogo 8.50 I've sailed, we could point higher, carry more sail beyond 20 kts, manage the gusts much better, and singlehand more easily. Add to that at least 2 kts of speed at all points and better feel of rudder and more "fun sailing". I don't care about another 100liters of water of having 160 liters of diesel because we are very frugal on both without any problem whatsoever - 2 weeks with 4 people and used about 300 liters of water for cleaning / bathing (had bottled water to drink) and only 22 liters of diesel.

On the build quality, I did a week of intensive sailing on a Dufour 325 (with the Glenans) and we were F4-8 all week with an experienced crew, February, between Sete and Marseille. I found that the SO woodwork was better with the door and cabinet hingework done into solid wood where the Dufour was directly into particle board. Needless to say, after 1 week of pounding the 325 was missing 3 cabinet facings and 1 door would pop open regularly. The SO is not light years ahead and you can feel the flex in the form in the big waves we had but it was better from a woodwork point of view. Deckgear was on par for each for the size and the build felt pretty much the same. That was my point on quality and again, my sole extended experience is on the 325. I've been on Beneteaus that have framed and non-framed woordwork for hinging and doors so I'm not sure it's a company wide thing or just model by model to hit the target costs...?

On the interior style, I wasn't commenting on that per-se as everyone has their preferences. Needless to say, my wife liked the look of the inside more that I did.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1413  
Old 09-10-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,193
Thanks: 21
Thanked 100 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 11
PCP will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by bb74 View Post
Croatia is probably next so if you know renters for a Salona, please let me know!

On the comparison between performance cruiser and a SO36, there's no contest. Comparing to a J109, A35 or even the Pogo 8.50 I've sailed, we could point higher, carry more sail beyond 20 kts, manage the gusts much better, and singlehand more easily. Add to that at least 2 kts of speed at all points and better feel of rudder and more "fun sailing". I don't care about another 100liters of water of having 160 liters of diesel because we are very frugal on both without any problem whatsoever - 2 weeks with 4 people and used about 300 liters of water for cleaning / bathing (had bottled water to drink) and only 22 liters of diesel.

I know pretty well the guys from the shipyard and they directly run a small charter business, I have charted one of their boats and I have saw a very nice and almost new Salona 34 there. I did not noticed if he had the performance pack or not.

Salonas and Elan are different because while they are performance boats, probably not as fast as a J boat or a Pogo, they have a good cruising interior.


Quote:
Originally Posted by bb74 View Post

On the build quality, I did a week of intensive sailing on a Dufour 325 (with the Glenans) and we were F4-8 all week with an experienced crew, February, between Sete and Marseille. I found that the SO woodwork was better with the door and cabinet hingework done into solid wood where the Dufour was directly into particle board. Needless to say, after 1 week of pounding the 325 was missing 3 cabinet facings and 1 door would pop open regularly. The SO is not light years ahead and you can feel the flex in the form in the big waves we had but it was better from a woodwork point of view. Deckgear was on par for each for the size and the build felt pretty much the same. That was my point on quality and again, my sole extended experience is on the 325. I've been on Beneteaus that have framed and non-framed woordwork for hinging and doors so I'm not sure it's a company wide thing or just model by model to hit the target costs...?

On the interior style, I wasn't commenting on that per-se as everyone has their preferences. Needless to say, my wife liked the look of the inside more that I did.
If you are right than Dufour is in trouble because they are more expensive than jeanneaus. But on the other hand Glenans is a great sea school with a huge knowledge about sea and boats. If they had chose to have Dufour instead of Jeanneau in their fleet they have probably their reasons and has you have pointed out, their boats have an hard use, with lots of bad weather.

By the way, last year the Salona guys were very satisfied because Glenans had bought them a all fleet of Salona 37. That should mean something specially because Salonas are not less expensive than other similar French boats and because French like to buy French boats.

Regards

Paulo
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1414  
Old 09-10-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 141
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
daviid is on a distinguished road
Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Thanks BB, nice post and I would say about I expected regarding the boat.

Now what I would like is that next Charter would be on an Elan 350, Salona 34 or First 35. I would like to hear the difference under your point of view regarding a true performance cruiser. If it is a Salona in Croatia maybe I even can get you a discount

I just don't understand that point about the better quality regarding the Dufour. Dufour are more expensive than Jeanneaus and Benetaus (Oceanis) and supposedly have a a slight better quality: Who is going to buy a more expensive boat with lesser quality?

I have sailed last year a new Dufour 425 and the quality seemed OK. I have compared in boat shows the quality of Dufour with Jeanneau and Benetau and don't seem to me that is lower, quite the contrary.

Regards

Paulo
Hi Paulo

We are chartering a Jeanneau 36i in Croatia in around 10 days - thanks to BB74 for the review. We are also planning to go to Marina Kastella to charter a Salona 37 or a Salona 34 depending on what is available after that. Any other suggestions in terms of where to find Salonas for charter? Any discount you are able to organise would be most welcome

All the best

David
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1415  
Old 09-10-2011
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Posts: 12
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
axel is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Axel it seems that you have misunderstood what I have said. I did not said that the Opium 39 had maintenance issues. I really hope he has not since I strongly recommended that boat to Anders when he was undecided between that one an another boat

Thanks for your rapid reply, Paulo. I don't think I have misunderstood you, I just didn't express myself very clearly, I guess. My question about maintenance issues was purely related to the swing keel (vs. the fixed option). I believe you have at various times pointed out the stress when a ballasted keel swings (in contrast to the more moderate forces involved with an unballasted centreboard that swings), and that this will eventually lead to expensive maintenance issues. I was interested in hearing Anders' thoughts on the matter, and what keel solution he has chosen.

I did not mean to imply anything negative about the build quality of the Opium, or that you had said anything to that effect. I completely agree with what somebody has said on this thread - maybe it was even you, Paulo - that with Wauqiez you would expect a strong and well-built quality construction.


This brings up another question: Are the Opiums from the first series (built by Alizé I think) of lower quality? Were there any design changes when Wauqiez took over? Anybody knows anything about that? Interesting question as the possibility of a used boat is probably greater from the first line...

Axel
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1416  
Old 09-10-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,193
Thanks: 21
Thanked 100 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 11
PCP will become famous soon enough
Quote:
Originally Posted by axel View Post
....

This brings up another question: Are the Opiums from the first series (built by Alizé I think) of lower quality? Were there any design changes when Wauqiez took over? Anybody knows anything about that? Interesting question as the possibility of a used boat is probably greater from the first line...

Axel
Hi Axel,
Yes, the general opinion is that the Alizé Opium had good quality but that Wauquiez Opium has a better quality (hull and interior). The Wauquiez interior is nicer and better, the keel position (or the bulb?) was slightly modified by the boat designer (a bit aft if I remember correctly) and the new Opium has a nice integrated bowsprit.

Maybe Anders can say more about it

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 09-10-2011 at 08:49 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1417  
Old 09-10-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,193
Thanks: 21
Thanked 100 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 11
PCP will become famous soon enough
The new 33 Soto one design:



It seems to be 33ft of sailing fun

Take a look at the movie:

velero S33OD - YouTube

S 33 One Design
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1418  
Old 09-11-2011
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Posts: 141
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 4
daviid is on a distinguished road
Hi Paolo

We leave Croatia from Split on Saturday 8 October early in the morning which means we need to have handed the boat back on Friday 7 October which is not ideal as the charters usually work from Saturday to Saturday. Nevertheless our start date for charter for the second week is fairly flexible.

My thinking was to approach a charterer over this period which I imagine will be very quiet for them and to try and negotiate a walk-in rate for say 7, 8, 9 or 10 days starting from Wednesday 28 Sep and ending Friday 7 October depending on what is available. I was planning to go to Rogoznica (I know that Ban Touring who charter Dufour are based there), Marina Kremik (Sunsail are based here and are already running big specials), Marina Kastella (Salona's charter business runs from here) and Split to see what was available in the 3 days before we get onto the Jeanneau 36i for the first week of charter. Our first choice is to charter a Salona 37 or a Salona 34 for the second week. If these are not available, then we will try to charter a Dufour 34e. If this is also not available, then we will try for an Oceanis 37. As you can see, these are all performance cruisers (except for the Oceanis 37) and are boats that I would consider buying second hand at some point in the future.

Let me know if you are able to assist or if there is anything else you need to know for now.

Please PM me; I am not able to do so myself as I only have 8 posts Apologies for the thread drift folks ...

Many thanks for your help in this.

All the best

David
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1419  
Old 09-11-2011
JAndersB's Avatar
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Sweden
Posts: 467
Thanks: 6
Thanked 4 Times in 2 Posts
Rep Power: 4
JAndersB is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Hi Axel,
Yes, the general opinion is that the Alizé Opium had good quality but that Wauquiez Opium has a better quality (hull and interior). The Wauquiez interior is nicer and better, the keel position (or the bulb?) was slightly modified by the boat designer (a bit aft if I remember correctly) and the new Opium has a nice integrated bowsprit.

Maybe Anders can say more about it

Regards

Paulo
Hi Axel,
Regarding the swing keel fixed keel question I was also tempted by a swing keel. It does give some interesting possibilities. At the same time, while sailing you have a much bigger draft to consider, to get the same stability. The price difference is also very big and you loose some volume in the interior. So, as located here on the swedish west cost with no tides at all and rather deep waters I decided for the fixed keel with a substantial bulb.

Overall build quality seems good even is some minor hick ups has been noticed, of which most noticable is a badly constructed shower drain in the forward toilet, so not so important

I am mosly impressed though by the lot of thoughts that have gone into the design, both overall as influenced by open 40 boats, deck ergonomics and small details in the interior.

Regards,
Anders
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
  #1420  
Old 09-11-2011
PCP's Avatar
PCP PCP is offline
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Portugal, West Coast
Posts: 16,193
Thanks: 21
Thanked 100 Times in 83 Posts
Rep Power: 11
PCP will become famous soon enough
Finally I got a bit of time to make that report about the Salona 41. I am interested in that boat as one of the boats that will meet my needs so this was not a regular charter, but really a long test sail.

The boat had the performance pack, regular dracon sails, good hardware and 2.70m draft. I will not want a boat with 2.7m draft but they can make it with several drafts beginning in 1.70m. I will want probably one with 2.25m draft. I was a little worried with the 2.70m draft but I would say that I found out that in Croatia that is not a problem at all. The anchorages are deep and very close to the shore you have more than 3.5m and as there are no tides I ended up as being normally one of the boats nearer to the shore, anchoring in about 5/7m of water and with 4m of water at the end of the 35m of chain.




Let’s start from the beginning:

When we motored out of the marina Kastela we were slightly back of the big pack of charter boats that were leaving the Marina and all boats were pointed to the same spot, 4 or 5 miles away, between the Island and the continent and the only way out of the big bay were Kastela Marina is situated.

20 minutes later my daughter said to me: Daddy, it doesn’t look well.

What are you talking about? Said I, surprised.

Daddy, you are overtaking all the boats, it seems that you want to get first to the anchoring spots, that’s not a race.

Humm, I looked at the engine rpm: 2000, on a 40hp Yanmar. That is economical cruising rpm. I looked at the GPS: 7K. How!!!!

I put all the engine down: 8.3K. Tried normal cruising speed at 2.300rpm: 7.7K and a wake like a fishing boat.

My wife said: I like this one.

As everybody knows and she certainly knows when you do coastal cruising and cruise to faraway places and like to travel, even with a sailingboat that needs very little wind, unless you have some kind of trade winds you end up to use your engine a lot. I would say that 50% sailing would be an extremely good performance and 1/3 motoring an exceptional one so a good speed under engine at low rpm with a modest consumption is a must to any long range cruiser as well as the extra power to meet some emergency situation in bad weather.

This boat meets brilliantly both needs.

Those speeds were measured in flat water but even with normal conditions and some small waves and pulling a dinghy the boat made consistently speeds over 7K at cruising speed and over 6.6K at low rpm (2000).



Regarding sailing, even with Dracon sails, the Salona 41 performed as I expected and that is not as common as it seems. Last year the Dufour 425 grand large left me disappointed even if the boat had very good test sails on boat magazines. I am sure it is a great boat, but not what I wanted.

As I said the boat has the standard dracon sails that were not bad (for dracon sails) and a 130% genoa.


Most of the days we had no wind at all in the early morning and just a weak thermic breeze that raised at late morning. With those conditions between 60/90ş of the wind and with very weak winds the boat went about 1K faster than wind speed . With 3.5K true wind we were making 4.5K and with 4.5 about 5.2K. With 6K wind the boat made about 6K speed, with 8K true wind a bit over 7 and with 10K true wind about 8K speed. The boat sailed almost without disturbing the water and only the GPS gave a truthful idea about the boat speed. The boat also accelerated sharply to the smallest of puffs of wind.

My daughter said to me:

Dady I like this one.



Take a good look, the boat is making a bit over 7k and the wake of the dinghy is bigger than the sailboat wake that is truly minimal.

I had no chance to sail the boat in medium/strong winds but I assume that this is a boat will take the first reef with medium winds. I reefed the boat anyway to see how it worked and worked just fine with a very strong boomjack keeping the boom up making unnecessary the use of the line that pulls the boom up (the first time I reefed decently a sail without using the boom cable to lift the boom). The reefed sail maintained a good shape.

The wheel feeling is very good for a twin wheel system. Not as good as the big single carbon wheel of the Elan 380 but miles away from the lack of feeling I found on the twin wheels of the Dufour 425. Maybe the Opium 39 has a slightly better feeling but that is very close.

The running rigging has German sheeting and has good material everywhere. It works well even if I find that it has a bit more friction than on the Opium 39 but that is amply compensated by two more winches, one for the Genoa and the other for the Boom (the Opium uses the same winch for the Genoa and the Boom). The car worked very well with very little force needed.

The boom winch and the genoa winch could be nearer the wheel and that would make them easier to use by the one that is at the wheel, I mean, solo sailing.The genoa cars are very long and very easily handed from the cockpit. They will permit the use of many different sized front sails.

The sailing position(s) for the wheelsman are good and there are several of them even if a removable raised platform for the inside foot, like the one that they have on the new 38 would come very handy when the boat is heavily heeled. I bet they will also mount them on this boat. The back bench that can be tilted and lowered, serving as “passarela” has the width necessary to seat or even to lay down (as I like) while the boat sails away.

I didn’t like the position of the instruments (plotter inside and wind and speed faraway over the entry) but that is easily modified. Pods will look bad on this boat but the wind and speed/depth can be mounted laterally near the wheels and the plotter can be mounted outside aft the last winch in a place where it can be viewed and used by the skipper while at the wheel.

The cockpit is very clean with lots of space. The twin wheels really clean up the space and with the table stored the sensation of space is great. However the boat is not large enough to give one the impression to be on the 2th floor when the boat is deeply heeled (as I experienced on the Opium 39) and without any place to grab if things turn badly. Of course this is just a personal feeling and probably unjustified but the truth is that I did not felt comfortable high in the air with the Opium deeply heeled. Maybe we can get used to it.

I thought that the boat had few places to get a grip but between the two wheels, the double backstay (synthetic cable sweet to the hands), the boom line, the winches and the long grab rail to the front of the boat, I would only add a lateral hand grab on each side of the spraywood.

The boat had a huge bimini that you cannot use while sailing. Certainly a thing for the charter business. You can change that for a smaller bimini that will protect the wheel man and a well made tent (for use while at anchor) that will be connected in two pieces on each side of the boom through a dedicated rail. I did not see it but by the description it seems interesting.

We all liked the boat interior and the illumination scheme, that gives a very nice ambiance and has dedicated led lights on the Cabins and chart table for low consumption reading and that will permit to read for a long time at night(the boat can have all led lights) My wife loved that, she is an unstoppable reader .

The interior was teak and the storage space very good, with several spaces dedicated to wine bottles. This boat had not the saloon port hulls (that I saw already on the 38) but the new ones will have them.

The chart table is big, has lateral drawers, a good storage under the cover and a comfortable sit.

The galley is big with two fridges (one of them has a small freezer) and lots of storage spaces but with no dedicated space for a garbage bin. It will have one if the optional vertical fridge is not mounted. I have asked my wife what she would prefer: The fridge she said: The garbage we put in a plastic bag suspended from the nearby cabin handle when cooking .After that anyway we never leave garbage inside the boat (we always have it outside suspended on the anchor locker)and the fridge is so nice….Women….but on the other way I never drank so cold beer in a boat …Men

The head on the two cabin version is kind of small but very well designed with two separated cabinets, lots of storage space, and the bowl is the big one (not the small one that I really hate) and put in a position that will give you all the leg space you need (I am big) and unlike many boats I have saw, even heeled by any side you will be comfortable and leaning on the sides…a true sofa.

The front cabin is big for a performance boat with lots of space and the lateral cabins are all right with good ventilation. The boat ventilation is good with two lateral big open port lights (one over the stove). This provides good lateral ventilation and would not be to mention if some performance boats would not have them or had just some tiny openings.

A very good interior for a performance boat with nothing fancy but cozy , light, spacious and with lots of storage spaces. For really living aboard the two cabin boat would be far more indicated.





Normally on 42ft boat I would not consider a 3 cabin boat. They simply don’t have the outside storage space a cruising sailboat needs, I mean for really cruising. Not so with this one. The boat has five outside lockers (not counting the one for the two bottles of gas), two on the floor, two on the side of the cockpit and the anchor locker. The two side ones are normal and for normal I mean that one of those is not just a very small space (to make the interior of the cabin bigger) as in some boats. There will more than enough space for all the stuff providing the liferaft and the fenders can be stowed in another place…and they can.

One of the floor lockers is a dedicated liferaft carrier and the other it is just huge: It can carry the big six fat fenders of our boat and with lots of space to spare. That is also the compartment were you can access the rudder and the place the ruder comes out of the boat. All that compartment as well as the anchor locker is separated by the rest of the boat by strong integral waterproof bulkheads. On this one you can have a big and improbable accident with the rudder post with open water (like the one that sink a Hanse some years back) and all you will have is a boat without a rudder with a partially flooded compartment.



The boat transom: you can see the two covers of the two floor lockers as well as one side locker. Also the back bench that can lower itself and rotate to be transformed in a "passarela" (a bridge to the marina when the boat is moored Mediterranean style).

The anchor locker is big and the 50m of chain occupy just a small part of the available space. Impeccable to carry garbage bags on longer passages. The space is so big that this is the first time that we could just take away the 50m chain without having to pull it sideways (inside the locker) not to block the Winch that is powerful and has a hand command. However I failed to understand how the clutch worked. Well it worked but once open I could not close it at least while the chain was running (that does not make sense, probably I have missed something). The Anchor is so incredibly bad ( a Bruce copy) that about it I would only say that they change it for any anchor you want (you just have to pay the difference).

The boat had a removable outside table that is a good idea badly executed with the wrong materials (it is heavy and doesn’t fit well in its mounts). It has also a removable stair that fits well in its mountings giving a rigid and good way up from the water. Of course I would have to rig a permanent emergency line that I could be pulled from the water and that would permit me to climb inside because it would just be a matter of time before I forget to mount the stairs before jumping in the water.

The access to the dinghy is very good and it is easy to put and take out the outboard engine on the dinghy.

I am not the only one that find this boat beautiful. The boat was photographed numerous times while we were sailing it and I am not counting the ones taken by tourist boats, only the ones taken by other charter boats.

The boat looks very good even on bad photos with towels hanging down from the lifelines:



After having discussed it with them I am pretty sure they will modify everything I don’t like to my specifications including an heavier keel bulb to make the boat more stiff and more able to carry sail with medium and strong winds, permitting to reef less times and with more wind.

So it will be that one? Well, all the family liked the boat and certainly in what regards sailing , motoring and living aboard fits the bill. The price is a bit over the budget for us even if the boat is a lot of boat for the money especially considering that Stainless steel grid to take care of the keel and shrouds efforts, a grid that only much more expensive boats have and that is one of the things I really love on this boat.

So why any doubts? Well I have made a test sail on the new 38 and I loved that one also and I am not sure I need a boat this big, I mean the 41.

The 38 will pay less on the marina will be more easily handed solo and will cost less 27 000 €. The 38 will sail as easily as this one in weak winds, it would be a bit less fast with medium and strong winds and a lot less fast on engine.

The interior is nice and adequate but not comparable with the sense of space on the 41 and off course, the storage space will be smaller and with the 38 I would have to have the two cabin boat.

Time to think and to ponder the advantages and disadvantages.

Maybe a week of charter on the 38?

Last edited by PCP; 09-11-2011 at 10:17 PM.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message Share with Facebook
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

By choosing to post the reply above you agree to the rules you agreed to when joining Sailnet.
Click Here to view those rules.

Register Now

In order to be able to post messages on the SailNet Community forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Please note: After entering 3 characters a list of Usernames already in use will appear and the list will disappear once a valid Username is entered.
User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.
Password:
Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.
Email Address:

Log-in

Human Verification

In order to verify that you are a human and not a spam bot, please enter the answer into the following box below based on the instructions contained in the graphic.




Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 6 (0 members and 6 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Cruising sailboats for sale welch Cruising & Liveaboard Forum 10 04-25-2012 06:20 PM
THE Yacht Builder List T37Chef Boat Review and Purchase Forum 26 07-08-2011 06:51 AM
Noob wonderings and questions about sailing, life at sail and sailboats Vans General Discussion (sailing related) 49 06-20-2011 01:18 AM
A List of ALL sailboats made with layouts? Myblueheaven Boat Review and Purchase Forum 8 10-08-2010 12:32 PM
Failure to Navigate - interesting post on Panbo Blog & from the NewsReader Mass Bay Sailors 0 12-11-2006 07:15 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 02:11 PM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.