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  #1671  
Old 11-17-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nemier View Post
Hi Paulo,
No, I have not decided on the Cat and it's quite a long story, one better told over a cool beer I have not been on Sailnet for quite some time, perhaps 6 months? - though I'd drop by from time-to-time, to get my sailing fix
I've been hanging out on the Nordhavn Dreamers site, because we were all set to buy a Nordhavn 62 My wife and I fell in love with the boat and the idea of how she'd traverse the world with us. That plan has sort-of been pulled away from us because the particular boat we were after is already selling.
Sooo, I'm busy making Lemonade over here. Every cloud has a silver lining though, and perhaps my love of sailing can be fulfilled after all. My wife has been spoiled by boats that don't heal anymore so the obvious choice is a Cat & I've only started half-hearted looking last week.

We are still forging away with the plan though. We are selling our house next spring to finance the boat, and hopefully heading out in the next year or two.
I guess it's going to be interesting to see what we actually end up with? In the mean time, we're using our own boat every time I'm home. I was just flipping through my log and we've cruised over 3500 miles in the last two years...

....
From a fast Multihull to a Nordhavn 62? You are really undiceded about the type of boat you are going to have





Well that has a huge maintenance and will cost a fortune in diesel just to cross the Atlantic, not to mention a circumnavigation.


If what you want is a very strong steel and seaworthy boat why not opt by a boat that can motor most of the time but that can also sail well in the trade winds, a steel one with a great interior:

Interesting Sailboats

By the price of the used Nordhvavn you cab buy a new big one, but that would to be a waste money. You could just buy this one that seems to be finished by the owner: That's a 48ft 2000 boat (not a great finish) and by that price you could have a complete refit at the factory and even so it would not be expensive.






This boat can carry about 1300L of water and 1100L of fuel and I am sure it as space and loading capacity for more tankage.


The finish is not luxurious but it is functional:


















For Sale. Noordkaper 48 - Schepenkring verkoopsteiger Lelystad, Netherlands - 3118359


Or you can be smarter and buy an almost new and properly finished 43ft. The boat has almost the same diesel Tankage :1000l and that on a 110cv low rpm engine gives at an economic cruising speed for almost two weeks. This is also a good sailing boat, providing you have trade winds and you will get them most of the time on a crossing.

Take a look at this 40ft and see how it sails:





They work well under engine. Here you have a 46ft:




The 43 that I was talking about is this one, a 2007 boat that they say it is like new:


















http://www.noordkaper.com/images-ver...kaper43%20.pdf

Noordkaper 40 - 43 - 46 - 52 - 56 - 60



Regarding the Nordhavn, why do you think there are so many for sell?

I don't think they have any problem, I believe that the running cost in what concerns voyaging are so high that even the rich guys find that too much.

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-17-2011 at 10:25 AM.
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  #1672  
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Hey Paulo,
Great post, and true to your thread---Interesting Sailboats!---
I found the post useful (earned you another Rep Point ) and I will be researching the Noordkapers some more. I had forgot about them.

I could get into the N62 reasoning but it would take us off topic. Someone could start another thread or PM me if interested. I'm in Thailand right now, woke up this morning, grabbed a cup of coffee and actually raced to the computer to see if there was any more info in this thread. Great work Dude, honestly...
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  #1673  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daviid View Post
Hi Folks

I have heard it said that in the good old days, boats were designed to sail well in the first place and the accommodation was designed around this requirement. Safety was an integral part of designing a good sailing yacht. Nowadays, accomodation and comfort is the primary driver and acceptable sailing performance is the new benchmark for many yacht designs. Safety is measured by the Stix and AVS ratings together with the stability curve which most manufacturers are not too keen to make public. This has already been discussed to some extent on this thread and I don't wish to revisit that rabbit hole. The point is that we are often left to form our own opinions regarding safety by considering the boat's reserve stability via it's B/D ratio and its form stability by looking at the hull and keel shape.

The latest postings on the Salona 35 which shows a B/D of 25% on a 2.15m keel with bulb and therefore low centre of gravity and the new Dufour 36e which shows a B/D of 29.7% on a 2.20m bulb keel leaves me thinking that perhaps these boats are being designed with too much emphasis on speed where weight is a primary concern and not enough on safety. There are many other examples where the new B/D norm appears to be way less than 30% with stability relying primarily on form stability via a beam carried far back as well as through the use of hard chines. This design is in sharp contrast to the advice given by the Pardey's in the September issue of Sail magazine where they were advocating a high B/D ratio for cruising - such as that found on a Catalina 38 where the B/D is around 39%. I understand that the primary use of a Salona 35 and a Dufour 36e is probably not cruising but surely there is a common denominator as regards safety in all boats.
Hi David!

I guess you are mixing things a bit. The Dufour 36 and the Salona 35 are definitively not boats designed around accommodations. These are boats designed to sail well first and then to have decent accommodations. Off course all boats are compromises and an ocean racing boat will even be more turned towards a sailing good performance ( that includes safety) and will only provide the minimum to live spartanly on the boat for one or two weeks time.

People tend to believe that ocean racers are more dangerous and less seaworthy than mass production boats. It is normally the opposite and the reason is simple: Most cruising boats will do coastal sailing and even those that go offshore when facing bad weather will take defensive tactics and chose the route with nicer weather.

Many times ocean races go deliberately for stronger winds and bigger seas because they will be faster there and when things go nasty they still try to continue to race and win distance over the others, while a cruiser would be taking defensive measures. So the strain that an offshore race boat is expected to support is much bigger than the one a cruiser boat is expected to endure, and the boats are designed accordingly, or at least should be.

The type of boats the Dufour and Salona belongs are a medium compromise.

We can stay that they compromise little towards sailing while other boats like for instance deck saloons, center cockpit boats or simply fat boats compromise much more their sailing performance to be more spacious and more comfortable inside.

Regarding Stix most NA finds that it is a misleading reference and I have the same opinion. The thing is pretty useless.

Stability curves are important, providing you know how to read them, but they only told half the story. They only refer to static Stability while they don't told anything about dynamic stability that is as important.

Regarding that Catalina story in what regards modern Catalinas go here and see what I have said about it on the thread:

New Catalina 385

Fin ballasted keels, iron or lead, cannot be compared in what concerns B/D ratio with keels with a foil and a bulb at the end. You have to look at stability Rm curves to compare. The ones with a torpedo on the bottom, like this Dufour 36e or the Salona 35 need a lot less ballast to make the same RM and therefore its B/D ratio even if smaller can be compared in the produced RM with a bigger ratio if that one belongs to a boat with a keel without a bulb (assuming equal draft).

Quote:
Originally Posted by daviid View Post

Form stability is great as long as the boat is not knocked down in a broach or whatever. At this point, reserve stability is what counts in terms of the boat righting itself and righting as quickly as possible. A boat which stands out for me in the modern crop of boats is the Salona 38 which has a B/D of 36% and a standard draught of 1.98. If my memory serves me, I seem to remember that Paulo has asked Salona to increase the weight of the bulb over and above this so it seems fair to assume that this is a primary concern of his too?

My personal interest is to cruise but to have fun whilst doing so, so if I can get from A to B quickly, then all the better. With the exception of the Salona 37 and Salona 38, most performance cruisers that I been tracking - Elan 37 and 380, First 35 and First 36.7, Dufour 34e and 36e and Jeanneau Sunfast 37 - have B/D ratios from around 30% to 33% whilst the cruisers with good performance (Jeanneau 36i Performance, Beneteau Oceanis 37, Hanse 385, SO379, Dufour375) all seem to have B/D ratios of around 27/28%. The standout in this last grouping as regards B/D is the Elan Impression 384 with a B/D of 32.6 and a Stix of 40!! (but unfortunately the boat is heavier and pays for it on the performance side) I am constrained by budget and so my universe excludes the likes of Malo, HR, Najad, Grand Soleil, Solaris et al

The question is therefore: have we been brainwashed by the various manufacturers to accept a yacht with a reserve stability that is lower than it used to be on account of improved form stability through hull and keel design?

Comments?

David
Well, it is difficult to answer to that last question and it is true that I would prefer a more ballasted Salona 35 (or Dufour 36p) but that is just because I want not only a fast boat but also a very stiff boat because I want to sail the boat solo offshore and possibly crossing the pond.

It will be safer? Yes I thing so. It is the Salona 35 unsafe to sail offshore: certainly not. I have not seen the stability curve of the 35 but I bet that has lots of righting moment at 90º heel.

Comparing its B/D ratio with the Salona 38 it is not correct because the Salona 38 does not have a torpedo keel (I want one) and a torpedo keel is more efficient in what regards righting moment ( the one that is on the 38 was chosen mostly because it is less expensive to made and also on account of handicap racing).

This kind of boats are more stiff than most of the ones that have a more compromised sail performance by their interior volume. Just compare the prices of the Benetau First line with the ones from the Benetau Oceanis line.

There are cruisers with a better interior that are as stiff or more than these performance cruisers ? Shure! The ones I like more are the X yacht line of cruising sailboats, but the Halberg Rassy or the Malo also fits the profile. They are very stiff and seaworthy boats even if considerably less fast especially in light winds.

Why there are not more? Because it is expensive to make stiff boats and because most of the sailors don't need them. The First look eventually not as luxurious as the Oceanis but are considerably more expensive, the same with the Elan performance line comparing with the performance cruiser line.

If they made the "cruising" line as stiff and with as good hardware as the performance line, than they would be more expensive than the ones from the performance line and who would buy them if the "neighbor" was selling apparently equal boats, but much more cheaply? Most of the sailors would not see any difference, except price.

It is a thing that one should have in consideration? Well, it depend, for most sailors that are coastal cruisers and don't go out with more than 25K wind, no! The modern boats are well designed and can take more than the vast majority can endure. For the minority that wants a more seaworthy and stiff boat because sails in higher winds or sails offshore or want a better bluewater boat with a better performance in heavier weather, Yes!

You are right in what concerns the cruising Elans they are, among the more fat cruising boats, between the group of the more stiff ones (Delphia too and some Hanse as well as the Vision line of Bavaria). Well I should not have said stiff because the last Oceanis 41 I am sure is a very stiff boat even if that stifmess comes mostly from hull stability. I was more thinking about stiffness at higher angles of heel and with a better reserve stability.

But there are something you have said that does not seem true to me: I don't think that neither the Salona 35 nor the Dufour 36e are very beamy boats and they are not examples of boats that take most of the stability from form stability, particularly the Salona.

For instance the Bavaria 36 has a beam of 3,67, the new jeanneau 379 (that is a 36fter) has 3.76, the Oceanis 34 has 3.65 (all in m). The Dufour 36e has 3.61 but the Salona 35 only has 3.36m while the first has 3.64.

This Salona 35 has already more 100kg of ballast than the previous model and the god thing with those guys is that they really listen the clients instead of trying to convince them that what they have is perfect for all. Probably they would agree in putting more 150/175kg on that bulb if a costumer wants the boat that way (they can do that because the steel grid that sustain the keel and connects the shrouds, distributing all the forces to the hull is over-sized ) and that would be enough for having a more stiff boat with a better reserve stability, a boat that would dispense guys on the side to go really fast on medium heather and that would be a better sailboat with heavy weather at the cost of a slightly worse performance in light wind. That will cost some extra money but that is not something that it would make the price skyrocket (I would say something about 5000€ over the lead keel option).

Bottom point: are all cruising boats the same? definitively not and you need to now something about boats if your choice is not only determined (as it is for most) by the prettiest and more comfortable interior.

But that does not mean that the boats that are on the market are not good, quite the opposite, there are almost no bad boats. The competition is so hard that the bad boats don't have place. Talking about the Oceanis 41 for example, even if it is not the boat that I want it is a very smart and well design boat that would suit much more people than the Salona 41, for instance. Off course I would not be one of them, but that is another story

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-17-2011 at 05:53 PM.
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Old 11-18-2011
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Hi Paulo

Thanks for all the input - I am learning all the time.


Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Hi David!


Many times ocean races go deliberately for stronger winds and bigger seas because they will be faster there and when things go nasty they still try to continue to race and win distance over the others, while a cruiser would be taking defensive measures. So the strain that an offshore race boat is expected to support is much bigger than the one a cruiser boat is expected to endure, and the boats are designed accordingly, or at least should be.

Agreed. Performance cruisers should have better stability curves as they will be pushed harder.


Stability curves are important, providing you know how to read them, but they only told half the story. They only refer to static Stability while they don't told anything about dynamic stability that is as important.

Agreed, thanks for reminding me about dynamic stability versus static stability.

Regarding that Catalina story in what regards modern Catalinas go here and see what I have said about it on the thread:

New Catalina 385

A fascinating read. I have copied the key part of a long discussion for everyone's benefit.

"However there are a common misconception that a superior B/D is always better than a lower one and the Catalina 385 has a big one (33.5%) if we compare it to European boats or to more modern designs.

European cruisers has for around 2m draft a B/D between 26% and 30%, that is a lot less than on the Catalina 385. At a first glance costumers would think that the Catalina is a more stiff and seaworthy boat.

But wait a minute, the Catalina with shallow draft was a remarkably bigger B/D than the fin keel (37.6% to 33.5%) that would mean that the shallow boat is more stiff? Of course not, the boat has to have more ballast to compensate the higher CG of its keel.

But all the European boats have keels with bulbs and that would not make them having a much lower center of gravity?

Of course. A bulbed keel will need about 30 or 35% less ballast than a keel like the one on the Catalina. While the CG of the Catalina keel is on the half of its draft or even less, the one of a bulbed keel is on the last 2/3 or 3/4 of the keel, depending if it is lead or iron that is used as ballast.

If we take for example the new Jeanneau 376 that has 6700kg of displacement for a Ballast of 1775kg we will see that the B/D is only 26.5%, a low value if compared with the 33.5% of the Catalina 385. But if we correct the value, taking into attention the bulbed keel and join more 30% to the Jeanneu ballast, the comparable value will be 34.4% a more or less similar value."



Fin ballasted keels, iron or lead, cannot be compared in what concerns B/D ratio with keels with a foil and a bulb at the end. You have to look at stability Rm curves to compare. The ones with a torpedo on the bottom, like this Dufour 36e or the Salona 35 need a lot less ballast to make the same RM and therefore its B/D ratio even if smaller can be compared in the produced RM with a bigger ratio if that one belongs to a boat with a keel without a bulb (assuming equal draft).

The bottom line therefore seems to be that, in the absence of a RM stability curve, we need to calculate an effective B/D ratio for bulbed keels before comparing them to the B/D ratio for non bulb keels on account of the lower centre of gravity.


Comparing its B/D ratio with the Salona 38 it is not correct because the Salona 38 does not have a torpedo keel (I want one) and a torpedo keel is more efficient in what regards righting moment ( the one that is on the 38 was chosen mostly because it is less expensive to made and also on account of handicap racing).

I do not know the shape of the keel on the Salona 38, but are you saying that there is a difference between a spade keel – as found on the Beneteau Oceanis 37 and the Jeanneau 36i – and a torpedo keel? Surely the difference that their shape has in relation to a torpedo will have minimal effect to the centre of gravity and therefore the effective B/D?

It is a thing that one should have in consideration? Well, it depend, for most sailors that are coastal cruisers and don't go out with more than 25K wind, no! The modern boats are well designed and can take more than the vast majority can endure. For the minority that wants a more seaworthy and stiff boat because sails in higher winds or sails offshore or want a better bluewater boat with a better performance in heavier weather, Yes!

Agreed but weather being as unpredictable as it is, even if we plan to sail in a decent weather window, we may be caught out in a blow in which case better stability will pay off.

But there are something you have said that does not seem true to me: I don't think that neither the Salona 35 nor the Dufour 36e are very beamy boats and they are not examples of boats that take most of the stability from form stability, particularly the Salona.

For instance the Bavaria 36 has a beam of 3,67, the new jeanneau 379 (that is a 36fter) has 3.76, the Oceanis 34 has 3.65 (all in m). The Dufour 36e has 3.61 but the Salona 35 only has 3.36m while the first has 3.64.

Agreed re beaminess on the Salona 35 and the Dufour 36e but then the reserve stability is even more important but the published B/D needs to be adjusted as you have pointed out above


Regards

Paulo
All the best

David
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Old 11-18-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daviid View Post
I do not know the shape of the keel on the Salona 38, but are you saying that there is a difference between a spade keel – as found on the Beneteau Oceanis 37 and the Jeanneau 36i – and a torpedo keel? Surely the difference that their shape has in relation to a torpedo will have minimal effect to the centre of gravity and therefore the effective B/D?
Yes David, that's just what I am saying. Let's see some keels in some recent boats:


Here you have the Dufour 335 keel



the Jeanneau 379 kee




The Benetau Oceanis 41 Keel




A Malo 37 keel



The Hanse 385 keel




The Dehler 41 Keel




Sly 42 Keel



Saare 38 keel



Solaris 37



Halberg Rassy 41



Tartan 4000



Catalina 385



Salona 38





Salona 40



Salona 34




As you can see, lots of different keels, including a traditional (not to say old) non bulbed lead fin keel on the Catalina 385.

The finality of the keel is to permit the boat to sail upwind and to support the ballast lowering CG of the boat. The keel does not have to have a considerable lateral area. A foil is enough.

I bet you are thinking what is the more effective keel and materials? That's an easy one, a titanium foil cut from a massif block and with a low profile lead bulb, like this one from an Open 60:



Of course the cost is ridiculous. The next best thing is the same, a foil cut from a block of high tensile steel that will support a bulb. Very expensive.

These two are the better because the high quality and strength of the metal used permits a narrow foil with little drag and strong enough to be able to resist to the huge forces created by the RM.










The next good thing is a steel keel hollow structure that supports a bulb. It cannot be so thin (more drag) as the massif one, but will put almost all the weight in the bulb:







Well this ones are expensive but start to be affordable, for instance this beauty is optional on the Salona 41:



I can give you an idea of the price for a 41ft. The standard keel on the S41 is all iron, than he has one of lead and iron that costs more 5 500€ and then this one that costs more 11500 € than the Standard one.

There is also a new type of very effective keel that I don't know very well and that is the top option on the S38. I have asked for stability curves to compare that keel with the lead/iron one. The keel was designed by Jason Ker, one of the NA that I like more and it is very strange, almost without a bulb and just a bit bigger on the bottom. I suppose that it has a steel structure but instead of all metal it is laminated and the interior is compact, full of some kind of plastic except on the bottom where it is all lead. It seems that the absence of any significant bulb gives it less drag and more grip:



Then it came the iron or steel/lead cast keel, with lead on the bottom and Iron or steel on the top:







This system is the one used by far on modern expensive sailboats, or as an option in some not so expensive. The foil that supports the lead bulb can be relatively narrow even if not as light as the hollow one. Anyway most of the weight still goes to the lead bulb.

Then it came the iron/stell keels with a torpedo. The lead is 31% more heavier than steel but that cannot compensate the possibility of a narrow foil with the vast majority of the weight down in a torpedo. In swallow drafts, a all lead bulbed keel can be better, but not with a normal draft.

They are similar in shape to the previous ones

Some prestigious brands still use all lead bulbed keels. They are less effective but simpler to build and with an easier maintenance even if with modern epoxy coatings the maintenance of the previous ones is not a problem. Due to the low mechanic proprieties of the lead, even with antimony, it is impossible to make a torpedo keel and even the fin bulbed ones are more thick and give more drag than the steel/lead ones. I suspect they continue to use them because clients still think that a all lead keel is better than a stell/lead keel:



The last group is the one of the Iron bulbed keels.This are by far the most used as standard on mass production cruising boats. Are they less effective than the bulbed all lead keels? Yes if the design is the same, but the Iron permits keels more narrow on the structural part and with a much bigger bulb on the bottom. I believe that a well designed all iron keel, one that takes advantages of the superior material strength, can be more effective than an all lead ballasted one. It is up to you to look carefully to the keel, for the size of its bulb compared with the structural part to see if it is the case or not.







Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 11-18-2011 at 03:33 PM.
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The biggest composite sailboat in the world, Hetairos with 197". I now, normally this very big boats are not very nice but this one is just gorgeous, so beautiful that looks smaler

The boat was designed by Dykstra (I have already posted some of his designs) and built by Baltic yachts. The best in two fields, design and building













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Old 11-19-2011
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New boat test for the Dufour 335, this time by the boat German magazine "Yacht". They say very well from the boat, from its interior space, storage space. They even call it : "The modern 10m yacht" but also raise some concerns about some inconsistencies, the most evident is the lack of a bow bulkhead.

They are right, these guys are capable of almost everything to diminish costs. How much would that have costed? 1000€? As nobody sees it and it is not very probable a frontal shock, they skip pit. I bet that now that the biggest European sail magazine pointed a finger at it, the new ones will come with a front bulckhead

The movie from the test is in German but you don't need to understand it to see it and it is a good one:

Dufour 335 GL: Die modernste 10-Meter-Yacht - YACHT-TV*|*YACHT.DE

For the ones that don't speak German, here there is one movie
in French:

video A bon port Spécial Grand Pavois [S.1] [E.2] - french, olivia maincent - videos Men's Up

Also one movie in Italian:

DUFOUR 335 - prima parte - YouTube

DUFOUR 335 - seconda parte - YouTube


This boat is amazingly well designed. Not only has a very modern keel (see the photo on the post about keels) one that permits to minimize ballast, as is very nice looking with an interior full of innovations and lots of storage spaces in improbable places. It is also a good sailing boat, one that looks a lot bigger than actually is and that manages to do that without looking fat or inelegant.

Some new photos:






















Last edited by PCP; 11-19-2011 at 10:49 AM.
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Old 11-20-2011
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Some Sunday movies. I enjoy them, I hope you too

Some extreme sailing... sometimes to extreme



and a nice movie with kids having fun with sailing. I don't know about you guys, but I love to see kids having fun with sailing. They should be more
The boats are Melges.

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Old 11-20-2011
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Today it seems that we stay with the movies

more two to remember that the next Grand Sailing Adventure will start in less than a year. Less boats than on the last one but with some surprises, being the most amazing one Alexandro di Benedetto that contrary of all the others is a true adventurer without a big racing curriculum but with a long list of incredible accomplishments. Take a look:

2009-2010: Non-stop solo round the world voyage without outside help on a 6.50 mini.
2006: Pacific crossing from Yokohama to San Francisco, sailing solo on a 20ft open racing catamaran
2002: Solo Atlantic crossing on a racing catamaran open 20ft cat.
2001: First solo voyage from Northern Italy to the Canary Islands on a racing open 20ft catamaran
1992-1993: Mediterranean and Atlantic crossing from Sicily to Martinique, double-handed aboard an open racing catamaran

http://www.alessandrodibenedetto.net...ulticoques.pdf

http://www.alessandrodibenedetto.net/

This guy is a bit crazy but it is a hell of a sailor. I am very curious to see what he can make with an old Open60 (truth is that I don't expect much).

The other new guy is a young one compared with the others: François Gabart, he is the opposite of Alexandro, an accomplished solo racer and the raising star among them. I believe Gabart can be a strong contender. He was a new boat, a very nice one, this one:










The new race promotional:





and to remember the last one:



Last edited by PCP; 11-20-2011 at 06:38 PM.
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Old 11-21-2011
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Rep Power: 10
PCP will become famous soon enough
The Vendee Globe is also a test for designers. A Sailboat for the Vendee Globe puts more problems than a boat for the Transat (more variable conditions) and it is a true challenge. From the last designs the more competitive seems to be Virbac-Paprec 3, Jean-Pierre Dick boat. Not only he won the last circumnavigation race (duo) as also won the last Transat. The boat and Dick would be the ones to beat in the next race.







The boat is a VPLP Verdier built by Southern Ocean Marine (New Zealand) and the specifications are:

SPECIFICATIONS: :
Launch date: 2010
Weight: 7.5 t
Ballast : 3000kg
Height of Mast: 29 m
Length of boat: 18.28 m
Beam : 5.70
Depth of Keel: 4.50 m
Width of Boat: 5.70 m


We had already talked about François Gabart and his new (2011) boat, Macif.
The boat was designed by VPLP-Verdier but built in France by CDK Technologies/ Mer Agitée and on its first Transat got a 4th place. Not bad at all for an almost new boar and a skipper that is new to the Open60.

SPECIFICATIONS:
Launch Date: 16 Aug 2011
LOA : 18.28 m
Beam : 5.70m
Mast height: 29 m
Displacement : 7.7 tonnes
Draft : 4.50m
Ballast: 3600 kg
Type of rig: wing mast
Daggerboards: 2
Upwind sail surface: 340 m2
Downwind sail surface: 570 m2

We can see that the boat is however different in what regards weight and ballast.


And we are going to look also to the new boat of Javier Sansó. The Spanish has a new boat designed by Owen Clarke Design LLP / Clay Oliver and built also by Southern Ocean Marine (New Zealand).

Technical specifications
Length: 18.28 m
Beam: 5.90 m
Draught: 4.5 m
Weight 8 t
Canting keel
Weight of bulb: 3.500kg
Sail surface: 600 m2

This is a heavy and powerful boat. We will see how it will work.

They have a very interesting video about its construction:





and testing stability:





and test sailing:



Last edited by PCP; 11-21-2011 at 07:53 AM.
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