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  #3151  
Old 11-30-2012
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Paulo have you posted yet on the Blue Jacket 40?

http://www.bluejacketyachts.com/blue-jacket-40.html
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  #3152  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Hi Faster,
That is a nice boat for a family, even a couple that likes to enjoy everything but bluewater cruising, very nice for that. What I love most is that the company advertises the boat for exactly what it is,'Delightful enviroment for family vacations and over night getaways.' I respect a company that sell its product truthfully. Unlike the one that was discussed earlier that claimed their boat was for serious cruisers when in fact it was probably far less sturdy than the Bluejacket.
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  #3153  
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Blue Jacket 40

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Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Paulo have you posted yet on the Blue Jacket 40?

Blue Jacket 40 (BJ40) Performance Sailing Yacht | BlueJacketYachts.com
Yes, about two months ago. I well repost for you.

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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Big surprise: Island packet is going to launch a series of performance cruisers. They will be called Blue Jacket line and will be designed by Tim Jackett (ex-President and Chief Designer at Tartan and C&C) in collaboration with Bob Johnson (CEO and Chief Designer at Island Packet).

The first one is already on its way to production and even if in what regards cabin design I find the boat too classic, not to say old fashioned, in what regards hull design and technical characteristics I love the boat.

Well, the keel could be more modern and efficient (it is similar to the one on my boat) but in what regards all the rest it looks perfect to me. In fact it is very close to the Comet 41s in what regards weight, ballast and hull design. It fits on the Italian way of looking to performance cruisers.

A relatively narrow boat with a good B/D a deep draft (2.30) and a big stability that is the opposite in design conception of the also new Tartan(and the CC121). I like a lot more this one.

Well, there are some things I don’t like: The traveler over the cabin and only one winch on each side of the cockpit that will have to be used for the mainsail and the genoa, but I believe that could be changed if clients ask otherwise.

Technical Characteristics
LOA: 39’ 10” (12.14 m)
LWL: 35’ 0” (10.67 m)
BEAM: 12’ 4” (3.76 m)
DRAFT: 7’ 5” (2.29 m) deep
5’ 2” (1.56 m) shoal
DISP: 16, 500 lbs (7,484 kg)
BALLAST: 6, 100 lbs (2,767 kg) deep
SAIL AREA: 883 sq ft (82.03 sq m) (100% FT)
MAST HEIGHT: 62’ 6” (19.05 m)
POWER: 40 HP (30 kW)
FUEL: 40 US gal (151 l)
WATER: 110 US gal (417 l)
WASTE: 25 US gal (80 l)
SA/D: 21.8
D/L: 172
DESIGNER: Tim Jackett w/Bob Johnson, N.A.



















They say about the boat:

Sailplan and rig:
The large sailplan is a further refinement of the Solent style rig featuring standard double head sails with a working jib and a lightweight 150% reacher that mounts on the integral bow prod, both furled with Harken® systems. The working jib is fitted with a carbon fiber Hoyt Boom® that is self-tending and improves performance with its close sheeting and self-vanging feature while the large reacher boosts performance in light air or when off the wind. The fully battened mainsail is equipped with a standard electric halyard winch and a low friction Battcar system and drops easily into a carbon fiber pocket boom with an integral cover and lazy jack system.

This easily managed rig has ample horsepower and versatility for optimizing performance in a wide range of conditions. All sheets lead to the cockpit near the helm and primary winches for short-handed convenience.
On deck:
On deck, anchor handling has been simplified and made especially convenient with a cleverly designed roller recessed in the bow prod providing secure stowage of the anchor and directing the rode to the anchor locker with a (optional) below deck electric windlass that keeps the deck and profile uncluttered. A deck hatch gives access to this area. Wide side decks with full length raised bulwarks, double lifelines, bow and stern rails and cabin top handrails provide security on deck.

The large cockpit has deep coamings, long seats and twin helm stations with great visibility and ready access to all sail control lines. Seat hatches provide access to storage areas and a (optional) central drop-leaf table makes for a great social area. Hinged transom doors open to the integral stern platform with a retractable swim ladder under a central hatch.

Materials used:
The Blue Jacket’s hull and deck are made with a state of the art vacuum infusion process utilizing 100% vinylester resin, quadraxial knitted E-glass reinforcements and a structural foam core. The end result is superior strength and stiffness with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional laminates. …

The use of premium structural foam coring produces better interlaminar bond properties with freedom from potential core deterioration compared to other choices and allows for an industry-best extended hull and deck warranty.


http://www.bluejacketyachts.com/


..

Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 11-30-2012 at 03:54 PM.
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  #3154  
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Bluejacket 40

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Originally Posted by hannah2 View Post
Hi Faster,
... What I love most is that the company advertises the boat for exactly what it is,'Delightful enviroment for family vacations and over night getaways.' I respect a company that sell its product truthfully. Unlike the one that was discussed earlier that claimed their boat was for serious cruisers when in fact it was probably far less sturdy than the Bluejacket.
I don't know where you read that but on the Design brief Tim jacket says this is a cruiser/racer able to be raced competitively around the buoys and in offshore races and that as a cruising boat it will be comfortable and easy. One can assume in coastal and Offshore conditions since this is also an Offshore racer and therefore an offshore cruiser when used that way.

This is not certainly a weekend cruiser and if it was advertised as that it was wrongly advertised. This boat has a overall good stability and a cruising interior that will support extensive cruising having not any problem in sailing offshore and crossing oceans. The boat has a water capacity of over 400L and the 150L of fuel will not be a problem since this is a boat that needs very little wind to sail and the water will be good for at least three weeks, I mean with a couple and you can always install an watermaker if needed. I have seen many circumnavigating with ease in boats with far less capacity in what regards tankage/storage and seaworthiness.

Well, it would not be indicated for extensive cruising with two couples, but with a couple (or one with kids) I don't see any problem and it would be the type of boat that I would choose for coastal sailing and occasionally cross an ocean or two

I guess that if they advertise it like that it is because it does not make much sense that the builder of an old designed and anachronistic boat like the Island Packet joins on his line a modern performance cruiser. People would just ask:

An Interview with Tim Jackett and Bob Johnson:...

Q: Bob, given Island Packet’s successful 33 year track record with over 2,500 yachts built and sailing in all corners of the world, how do you see the Island Packet line evolving, and what impact might the Blue Jacket series have on future Island Packets?

A: (BJ) Wow…give me a crystal ball! I guess I’d respond by first saying the “design brief” for Island Packet will almost certainly remain unchanged, with its focus continuing to be on seakeeping, safety, livability and ease of handling for a cruising couple. Different manufacturing technologies (infused composite hulls and decks, carbon fiber components, etc.) introduced with the Blue Jacket line may eventually find their way into Island Packet construction if deemed appropriate, but the two product lines address different market segments with different sets of priorities.

I certainly would prefer to go offshore or cross an ocean on the Bluejacket than on a 40ft Island Packet, seaworthiness and sea motion included and I am sure I am not the only one that think that way.

But he is right saying that the old shoe is addressed to other type of sailors

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-30-2012 at 05:45 PM.
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  #3155  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

I read that on the Bluejacket website. I'm not saying you can't cross oceans in this boat because it is a nice boat and seaworthy. But I believe that Island Packet used accurate words describing their boat. The Bluejacket 40 would be a great boat for taking the family down to the caribbean from the southern USA for the winter. But with only 40 gallons of fuel making full ocean passages seems not all that practical to me. After many ocean passages over forty years I like the idea now of being able to motor if needed for at least 800 miles. Tonga to NZ is a good example where there are some passages where a stationary high pressure was right in the middle of the passage. Everyone no matter how romantic about sailing would like to be able to get to NZ as fast as possible before the next nasty weather shows up. I have done it with 10 gallons of fuel and did not mind because that is what we had on board. But I'm wiser now and if you are lucky enough to be able to have a cruising boat with lots of fuel you should. I would own the Bluejacket if we decided to stay in Mexico and sail the Sea of Cortez where distance for fuel is not a problem.

I always wanted a Hinckley SWester but now I realize they were made with the New Englander in mind for two week cruises and trips down south, little fuel and water for trips across the Pacific and the Indian Ocean, but they could do it, that's for sure.

Cheers.

Last edited by hannah2; 11-30-2012 at 06:03 PM.
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  #3156  
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Cruising Styles and different pleasures.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hannah2 View Post
I read that on the Bluejacket website. I'm not saying you can't cross oceans in this boat because it is a nice boat and seaworthy. But I believe that Island Packet used accurate words describing their boat. The Bluejacket 40 would be a great boat for taking the family down to the caribbean from the southern USA for the winter. But with only 40 gallons of fuel making full ocean passages seems not all that practical to me. After many ocean passages over forty years I like the idea now of being able to motor if needed for at least 800 miles. Tonga to NZ is a good example where there are some passages where a stationary high pressure was right in the middle of the passage. Everyone no matter how romantic about sailing would like to be able to get to NZ as fast as possible before the next nasty weather shows up. I have done it with 10 gallons of fuel and did not mind because that is what we had on board. But I'm wiser now and if you are lucky enough to be able to have a cruising boat with lots of fuel you should. I would own the Bluejacket if we decided to stay in Mexico and sail the Sea of Cortez where distance for fuel is not a problem.

I always wanted a Hinckley SWester but now I realize they were made with the New Englander in mind for two week cruises and trips down south, little fuel and water for trips across the Pacific and the Indian Ocean, but they could do it, that's for sure.

Cheers.
Well, some would think that regarding what you say this is the better boat for offshore cruising or to circumnavigate:



I knew once a guy that circumnavigated solo without any problem on a 33ft sailboat without any engine. That was back in the first years of the 80's and the boat was heavy and not particularly fast (the Bluejacket is much faster and sail with much less wind). He was not a poor guy, he was a sailing instructor, a great sailor and didn't need or want any engine.

Almost 10 years ago I remember a member of this forum that sailed from US to Australia on a 40ft fast J boat with much less fuel tankage than the one the Bluejacket has. At the time that make me some confusion and I asked how mach fuel he had wasted. I don't remember the right numbers but it was ridiculously little, less than half the tankage that if I remember rightly was 90L. He used that mostly for charging the batteries....and its average speed was awesome too (I don't remember the number but I know I was impressed and I am not easily impressed).

The type of boat you favor is a better sailer than the Nordhaven, by a large margin but also by a large margin is a worse sailer than the Bluejacket. I am not referring to seaworthiness or storage but simply to speed and most of all the amount of wind needed to sail. While the Bluejacket will probably make with a Geenaker 4K speed with 4K wind your boat would be almost dead on the water. That makes for a lot of fuel

Note that I don't defend on this thread any type of boat over another. There are sailors for all of them. Neither I try to impose my personal tastes to other sailors, but describing a boat like the Bluejacket 40 has a boat for "over night getaways" is ridiculous and inappropriate. That would be a description that would fit in another beautiful american sailing boat, the Morris 36 classic:



Regarding circumnavigating and the boat different kind of sailors would chose to do it, we are following the circumnavigation of a French Young couple, both very experienced sailors, that have chosen a boat with even less storage or tankage than the Bluejacket. They are having a great time, have not any problem and love their boat, a Fox 10.20: a small and fast performance cruiser



Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-30-2012 at 06:58 PM.
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  #3157  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Again as far as the bluejacket 40 goes and what the company says on its website, " The Bluejacket 40 is a delightful enviroment for family vacations and overnight getaways as well as racing around bouys." I just think the company is being honest. But don't get me wrong the Bluejacket 40 can sail anywhere a sailor wants to take it.

As far as the young French couple go in their Fox, I congratulate them they are out there in a great boat and enjoying life. I wish more young people could do the same instead of having to work their butt of just to make ends meet. Remember, "Life is not a practice run it is the real thing." My wife and I in our 60's now enjoy being in the same anchorages as the young. We still think young but I can't surf 15 foot hollow waves anymore. That explains who we have become and out of senseability. The point is there are many more of us in our 50's and 60's out sailing oceans and we have different needs. If I was 28 years old I would want a Pogo or a Fox because they are great boats and affordable. But in our old age we are wise enough and experienced enough to understand we want things like motoring through a high pressure with no wind if it looks like there is bad weather on the way. We will sail our new boat until she will not sail because there is no wind but I then turn the engine on for how many hours it takes to find wind. And believe me we are not in a hurry just want to be prudent.

As far as those who sail without an engine aboard, they are few and are very romantic or just never had the money to get a boat with an engine. Nothing wrong with that remember that's what I did at 22 years of age.

We picked our new boat because we are lucky to be able to afford it. We wanted to do something new and exciting. We could have gone out and bought an old valiant or a mason 44 like we had before or a new Oyster. but the idea of a more modern design was our desire. We could have gone out and bought a Fox, a Pogo or a Bluejacket40, we like them but they just did not fit our needs for a bluewater cruiser. We now on our new boat coming have good speed, tankage, comfort and safety and the ability to go to atolls all over the world and jungle rivers of S. America or Borneo and on our terms. That is what fit our needs to enjoy our last bluewater boat. I think the majority of Bluewater cruisers wish if they could have it would like something a little more than the BlueJacket 40. Mind you not that much more.
Cheers
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  #3158  
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Long range cruising and sailboat preferences.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hannah2 View Post
Again as far as the bluejacket 40 goes and what the company says on its website, " The Bluejacket 40 is a delightful enviroment for family vacations and overnight getaways as well as racing around bouys." ....

I think the majority of Bluewater cruisers wish if they could have it would like something a little more than the BlueJacket 40. Mind you not that much more.
Cheers
More important than whatever the message the company that is making and selling the boat want to pass is what the boat was designed for and the one that knows about that is the one that had designed it, Tim Jackett and he says about it: The design challenge presented was to create a yacht with a performance pedigree, one that could compete effectively in around-the-buoy and offshore races yet provide a level of comfort, build quality and ease of use that would gratify the entire family.

I know enough of sailingboats to recognize what they are made for in what regards cruising and racing and I am quite sure that describing Bluejacket sailing cruising program as a boat particularly suited for "overnight getaways" makes as sense as describing a Hunter 40 as a boat specially suited for bluewater cruising. Brands can say what they want to sell the boats, we would be fools if we believed in all what they say

Regarding bluewater cruisers wanting something more than the BlueJacket, it all depends on the cruisers. Some would want a smaller boat, others a bigger boat and the ones that would want a bigger would not want necessarily an aluminium centerboarder. Some would want an heavier fiberglass boat like an Amel, others would want a faster and lighter one like a Pogo 50, others would want a even faster ocean cat like the Outremer 49.

Personally If I was going to circumnavigate I would not chose a boat not bigger than 40ft, I would chose a light boat easy to maintain, easy to sail solo (with small sails), stable, and that would sail with very light winds. I guess that a JPK 38 with a swing keel would be a possible choice. I find the Pogo 12.50 already too big to be sailed solo comfortably, and solo because if I do that there is no way I could bring my wife alone. She likes to do coastal cruise but simply is not interested to be 15 days in a boat without going to shore, and by the way I have almost 60 years old but like to sail fast and get bored in a slow boat and I am not the only one, I mean "old" sailors that like to cruise while enjoying sailing fast.

Each case is a case, sailors are different and that's why there are so many different type of boats designed for bluewater cruising and voyaging. As an example look at the difference in cruising style and sailing between the bigger sister of your boat, an Aluminium Boreal 50, a Pogo 50 or an Outremer 49. All are designed having in mind long distance cruising, but how different can they be? As different as the type of sailors that will prefer each one, and that has nothing to do with age

The Boréals are aluminium sailing yachts with a centerboard, designed for long offshore voyaging.
- This means that the approach is totally different from a ‘holiday’ cruising boat
- built in aluminium (which, whilst not an absolute necessity for long voyages, remains the best choice of material)
- with a centerboard inside a keel box.

Introduction


Like its siblings in the Pogo range, the Pogo 50 is tailored for fast cruising : it is light, wide, and features a deep (lifting !) draft and generous sail area. Its speed and its seaworthiness put far, far away shores within reach ! Its shallow draft, once the keel is up, allows access to all little paradisiac coves. Its lean deck plan and large cockpit make it the ideal boat at the mooring.
Pogo 50 | finot-conq architectes navals


Go fast, go far, enjoy yourself
The Outremers were created from a solid concept: the design and build of catamarans which are all seaworthy, fast and simple. ...Seaworthy, to be free to go anywhere. Seaworthy means to favour security. ...Fast for both safety and the sensations.
Speed is an element of safety and comfort. When facing a particular weather scenario, the average speeds our boats are capable of, allow routes which would otherwise be impossible at lower speeds. Speed is a source of pleasure. It is the very essence of sailing.
Since 1984, 200 such craft have sailed all the seas of the globe crewed by couples and families making their dreams a reality.....The majority have sailed far and wide, with numerous circumnavigations of the globe being achieved.

Outremer Catamaran - The Concept

Regards

Paulo

Last edited by PCP; 11-30-2012 at 10:11 PM.
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  #3159  
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Vendee Globe

And Voila, Armel given as first doing 17.4K , Jean-Pierre much more South doing 20.9K at only 20.3Nm, François on the same course doing 20.4K at 40.9Nm and Stamm in an intermediate course regarding Armel and Jean-Pierre doing, 20.5K and at 98.8Nm.

Things seem clear now and tomorrow Jean-Pierre will be probably leading, François is going to take more time but probably will pass also Armel and Stamm will be closer also. Armel has not so much pressure but most of all it has a worst wind angle. But they all will be very close and that's what we want

Fantastic race!!!

Last night I had said that François Gabart and Jean-Pierre Dick were going probably have record speeds. Here it is the confirmation:

Breaking News:Yesterday, between 11am GMT Thursday 29th to 11am GMT Friday 30th November François Gabart (MACIF), travelled from point to point, 482.91 miles in twenty-four hours, averaging speeds of 20.1 knots. This breaks the record held previously by Alex Thomson in 2003. Confirmation of the record is subject to the WSSRC validation.

Vendée Globe 2012-2013 - Tracking


Day 21 highlights - Friday, November 30, 2012 por VendeeGlobeTV
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Old 12-01-2012
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Re: Vendee Globe

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
....

Things seem clear now and tomorrow Jean-Pierre will be probably leading, François is going to take more time but probably will pass also Armel and Stamm will be closer also. Armel has not so much pressure but most of all it has a worst wind angle. But they all will be very close and that's what we want

...
Well, I was 100% right, how coll is that

Jean-Pierre is leading, making 20.3K and with an advantage of 11.7Nm over Armel that is making 19.7K. That lateral distance has almost disapered and we will have a drag race again.

François also recovered to Armel and it is only at 25.7Nm, about the same distance that separated him from Armel when they went for different strategic options. He is making 19.9K, he is close to the same course as Jean-Pierre and have maintained the same distance to Jean-Pierre.

The two big winners of the last days were Jean-Pierre that won 97Nm to Armel, since they went to different strategic options and Stamm that won 85nm to Armel and it is now at 78Nm from Armel. He is sailing in about the same course has Armel and doing 20.1K.

I guess that we have in Stamm an unsuspected Swiss contender for the victory. He was discussing the first places some weeks back, he had big problems, went to the top of his mast with the boat sailing at speed (quite incredibly that), repaired his light geenaker, recovered brilliantly and his back again on the head of the race (4th now). Great sailing, great sailor

...

Last edited by PCP; 12-01-2012 at 09:40 AM.
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