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  #4071  
Old 05-12-2013
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Collision Mare with a fishing boat.

One more collision of a fishing boat with an Open 60, this time the Mare of Jorg Riechers. Jorg was training and had a full crew on the boat, it was night and they tried to avoid a fishing boat without lights or watch, even less AIS. Too late, they were lucky in not losing the mast. The Fishing boat run away without helping.

The talented German skipper that has for the first time a Open 60 saw his dreams very close to an end, he was very close to have the boat destroyed.

After many victories in mini racers and class 40, he is going to race the Barcelona world race with it (circumnavigation).

mare racing team

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  #4072  
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Palma Vela 2013

More beautiful sailboats





And some older spectacular images:





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Last edited by PCP; 05-12-2013 at 07:52 PM.
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  #4073  
Old 05-13-2013
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Re: J 105

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
We have talked a lot about Jboats lately, the American boats that the European like more than the Americans

Here you have a great footage of a J 105 very well sailed with a short crew
I can personally attest to the offshore virtues of the J 105 for short-handed sailing, having raced one, doublehanded, from San Francisco to Hawaii in the 2000 West Marine Pacific Cup Race. It does have a few limitations, particularly in one-design (montotype) configuration, on long, downwind races - it needs a symmetrical kite option for VMG running, and multiple headsail options. It can also be a wet boat in big breeze and waves. But it's extremely well-behaved and stiff, even without crew weight on the rail.

But a fine boat, lack of headroom notwithstanding.
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Re: J 105

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
I can personally attest to the offshore virtues of the J 105 for short-handed sailing, having raced one, doublehanded, from San Francisco to Hawaii in the 2000 West Marine Pacific Cup Race. It does have a few limitations, particularly in one-design (montotype) configuration, on long, downwind races - it needs a symmetrical kite option for VMG running, and multiple headsail options. It can also be a wet boat in big breeze and waves. But it's extremely well-behaved and stiff, even without crew weight on the rail.

But a fine boat, lack of headroom notwithstanding.
Thanks for posting we all appreciate your insight.

In fact is amazing that a boat narrow as the J 105 and with a transom hull design maximized for upwind sailing can be ocean raced downwind with a crew of two for many days. That does not only say very well about the boat balance and design but also about the crew. Chapeau to you

I have some questions: Downwind could you leave at speed the boat on autopilot?

Do you have sailed with short crew boats more adapted to short crew or solo sailing and if so can you comment on the differences, specially going fast downwind?

Regards

Paulo
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  #4075  
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Re: Palma Vela 2013

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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
More beautiful sailboats
That Spirit of Jethou is one wet boat offshore (and inshore, for that matter). Noticed that for much of the time the helmsman was the only person on deck not wearing a PFD. Didn't see a harness or tether, either. Interesting, given how far offshore the boat appeared to be.

Every time they buried the nose going downwind I found myself wondering if the owner should give David Raison a call when it's time for a new boat. Those are precisely the conditions where his scow concept would pay some dividends. Juan K applied a similar approach to his VOR design, and we saw how that turned out.

Great footage. Makes me want to be offshore, even on a boat as wet as Jethou, particularly if the owner is springing for that handsome Gaastra gear!
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  #4076  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

And while I'm in posting-frenzy mode, let me take a minute to express my sincere thanks and appreciation to Paulo and the other posters in this, my favorite SailNet forum. Believe it or not, after finding this forum, I started on page 1 and read through all 400+ pages, over several days, until I got caught up. Can't begin to say how much I learned, along the way, and how many images and videos of beautiful boats, in exotic locations, engaged in terrific sailing I enjoyed.

Of course, the process of choosing a performance cruiser has now become even more difficult than before, since my attention was drawn to the Dehler 38, the Elan 400, the JKM designs, and others. Don't know how I'm going to settle this problem, but am certainly finding the process delightful.

So, thanks again and keep feeding us a steady diet of amazing boats.

Best!
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  #4077  
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Re: J 105

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Thanks for posting we all appreciate your insight.

In fact is amazing that a boat narrow as the J 105 and with a transom hull design maximized for upwind sailing can be ocean raced downwind with a crew of two for many days. That does not only say very well about the boat balance and design but also about the crew. Chapeau to you

I have some questions: Downwind could you leave at speed the boat on autopilot?

Do you have sailed with short crew boats more adapted to short crew or solo sailing and if so can you comment on the differences, specially going fast downwind?

Regards

Paulo
Paulo -

The J 105 was surprisingly stable downwind under pilot. I wish I could remember which type we were using (already 13 years ago), but it was ram-driven under the deck, attached directly to the rudder post, so very responsive.

Obviously, sail trim was crucial in breeze with big swells, and we often went with a single reef in the main and switched down from .75 kite to 1.5 reacher, to accommodate the rapid changes in apparent wind as the boat accellerated down the face of waves. We only had A-sails, so didn't have to test the pilot under VMG conditions (although you can sail a J 105 at suprisingly deep angles - as deep as 160-165 AWA - under asymmetrical in offshore conditions, without fear of a round-down and kite-around-the-headstay adventure).

Since we were doublehanded, most of the time spent on watch was alone (we stood 3-3, except during squally conditions at night, when we went 2:2 and sometimes just slept in the cockpit). So I would say the pilot drove much of the time, especially at night, and very effectively. Indeed, there were times at night when the pilot was sailing much better than I could, and allowed me to concentrate on sail trim instead.

The funny thing is, while we had raced the J 105 for 3-4 years, including offshore, we only did one doublehanded race on it - the Doublehanded Farallones Race, in 2000, shortly before the start of the Pacific Cup. But the boat is so easy to sail that it wasn't a problem. And in 2000+ miles we only experienced one equipment failure, when the tack line block at the end of the sprit broke. However, we had rigged a safety line from the tack to the stem-head fitting, so didn't even wrap the kite - quick take-down, replace the block, and re-set. Maybe 20 minutes.

Many people complain that the J 105 is underpowered, which is true in OD configuration for light-air venues. But for San Francisco Bay it was plenty powered-up, and for offshore as well. As I said, it benefits from wider sail options, of course, but I don't think it hurts the rating much under IRC or ORC. Accommodations, of course, are quite sparse for extended cruising, but luxurious compared to a Mini 6.50.
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  #4078  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

The J/105 is one of the most stable boats sailing downwind I steered. I raced a few years at the helm of one. In coastal races up to 200 miles downwind with winds up to 35 knots and I steered with two fingers, completely stable boat, flying over the waves at 16 knots without a single broach.
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  #4079  
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Hulls and sailboats: J 105/A 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
And while I'm in posting-frenzy mode, let me take a minute to express my sincere thanks and appreciation to Paulo and the other posters in this, my favorite SailNet forum. Believe it or not, after finding this forum, I started on page 1 and read through all 400+ pages, over several days, until I got caught up. Can't begin to say how much I learned, along the way, and how many images and videos of beautiful boats, in exotic locations, engaged in terrific sailing I enjoyed.

Of course, the process of choosing a performance cruiser has now become even more difficult than before, since my attention was drawn to the Dehler 38, the Elan 400, the JKM designs, and others. Don't know how I'm going to settle this problem, but am certainly finding the process delightful.

So, thanks again and keep feeding us a steady diet of amazing boats.

Best!
Thanks for your words.

Getting back to that race (San Francisco to Hawaii) if you wanted to do it again solo or duo in a boat slightly faster than the J105 and more easier to sail (even more faster on account of that), in a boat with a far better cruising interior, the recommendation would be obvious: The A 35.

Other boats would be equally suitable but with a poorer cruising interior: A31, JPK 10.10, Sunfast 36. All would also obtain good results in crewed racing (with a different rigging).

If you only wanted to do the race for the fun of it without concerns with the rating or handicap classification (and the same with crewed racing) you could go fast and have fun with a Opium 39, a JPK 38 or a Pogo 10.50. They all offer a more spacious cruising interior and in some cases a really a very good one.

If you wanted to do that in a boat with a great cruising interior (but also on a more difficult one to solo sail and overall probably slower), that could also obtain great results in crewed racing, you could do it on any Salona, with any Elan or Dehler, with the First 35, with the J122, an Arcona, Grand Soleil and many other boats. of course you can do that too with the First 40 but that one has a very poor anchor locker and that is a no no for cruising, at least for me.

Not all of them are as well suited for solo sailing and I am not talking about rigging. I am talking about hulls and boat that have less or more stability at small angles of heel. That has to do with beam, with transom design and beam brought aft. Of course, that is globally prejudicial for upwind sailing so the boat, unless is not to be used in a regatta field (like the Pogo), has to be carefully balanced in what regards upwind and downwind sailing, solo and crewed sailing.

One of the best in what regards that is the A35. The boat is not only a chronic winner of the Transquadra in solo or duo as it is a IRC champion with many major races on his belly.

Let's have a look at the hull of a J 105 and the one of a A35:





We can see that on the lateral view there is not a big difference. The A 35 is a more modern boat and has a tudder with less wet surface a bigger waterline but the keels are not that different (the A35 can have also a bulbed keel, it depends on the handicap system the boat is racing).



But regarding the superior view things are much different. Not only the A35 has more 20 cm of beam as it have it pulled aft.

The weight is favorable to the J105 (3515kg against 4450 kg), the B/D is very high and similar to both boats (44%). The A 35 has more 20cm of draft but the J105 has a small bulb so things should not be much difference, except that those extra 20cm of beam on the A 35 will make the GZ bigger and will provide more stability that is used for carrying more sail area: 67.5m2 against 53.60. But the bigger difference is on the sail area each boat is able to carry downwind: where the A35 can carry a spy with 95m2 while the J 105 was one with only 77m2.

What makes that possible it is not only the difference in RM provided for more beam and more weight but also the difference in the transom and the aft part of the hull that makes the boat easier to sail and manage:





The easiness to sail fast downwind is one of the things that makes the A35 a great short crew racing boat. Going very fast downwind, while on the j 105 the roll movement of the boat, induced by waves or the lateral component of the mainsail has to be carefully counteracted by the weight of the crew and an experienced helmsman on the A35, at small angles of hell that fat ass starts to produce RM that rapidly grows with a small increase of heel. That produces a dampening effect that diminishes greatly roll and makes the boat easier to sail.

On the J105, with less beam and with a skinny ass the boat needs to heel to provide any significant RM to counteract any unbalance and then the force provided will only be stopped with heel on the other side and a roll movement is created that an autopilot can have trouble stopping.

On the A35 the hull shape will stop that movement without intervention. That's why you can sail fat ass solo boats fast downwind on autopilot while that can be tricky on narrow boats with a narrow transom.

In what regards absolute performance a narrow boat with a big and very experienced crew compensating all unbalances and keep the boat straight downwind in an equilibrium act will have less drag and the boat will be fast but that can be so difficult that designers have bean learning that even there some compromise is the best option at least for Ocean racing. For solo sailed boats that compromise is just a bigger one.

Upwind if the boat is well designed the extra drag is almost (or all ) compensated by the extra RM and the possibility to carry more sail. Again all is a question of compromise.

Boats with the transom brought back sail with an asymmetrical wet surface and that explains why twin rudders make sense even in not very beamy boats but with the transom brought back. The rudders are that way at the middle of each asymmetrical sail surface. Being asymmetrical and oblique will also increase slightly the LWL and increase hull speed.

You should be happy in having such a big choice. The real question is what you are going to do with the boat and what compromisse are you willing to take in what regards upwind and downwind sailing, solo or crew racing and cruising, not mention price. There are boats for all the tastes

Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 05-13-2013 at 12:11 PM.
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  #4080  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by DiasDePlaya View Post
The J/105 is one of the most stable boats sailing downwind I steered. I raced a few years at the helm of one. In coastal races up to 200 miles downwind with winds up to 35 knots and I steered with two fingers, completely stable boat, flying over the waves at 16 knots without a single broach.
With all our focus on the J 105's downwind capabilities, we should not overlook that it goes upwind quite nicely as well, particularly if you have the right crew weight on the rail. Most of my time spent on the boats has been in the bow position, and looking aft I would see the helmsman typically steering upwind with a thumb and two fingers on the wheel, even in moderate breeze.

Interestingly, while I consider the J 105 to be a rather wet boat, the raised cockpit combing does a good job of channeling the water coming across the deck aft to the stern, so if you happen to be in the cockpit (preferably behind a dodger), the boat is actually quite dry. So, for cruising I suspect it would be rather comfortable (I've never cruised one and never been aboard a J 105 that had the dodger rigged) and dry.

One more story - for the 2008 Coastal Cup Race, from San Francisco to Santa Barbara, California (350mi / 560km), we encountered breeze in the 30-40 knot range off the infamous Point Conception where we ended up going to bare poles for a time, while still doing about 8 knots downwind, in very nasty cross-seas (one other J 105 was dismasted nearby). When things calmed down we carried the .75 the rest of the way averaging 13-14 knots, until we were finally forced to do a letter-box drop just north of Santa Barbara when the late afternoon offshore breeze kicked back up into the 30s, and we were screaming along with the foredeck covered in water, in the high teens. I was on the wheel at the time and can remember seeing the eerie glow of the bow lights shining under the water coming over the bow, wondering how were were going to slow down and keep the rig on the boat.

Needless to say, we did get the kite down only to have the breeze die to nothing within just a couple miles of the finish (in typical Coastal Cup fashion). We spent the night bobbing up and down within site of the Santa Barbara pier and the finish line, finally finishing on the early morning offshore.

Just one of many fond J 105 racing memories.
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