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  #4171  
Old 05-29-2013
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
...
One last thing about this really interesting boat: It looks to me like the size of the dinghy garage pretty much determines the size of dinghy you can have; anything bigger, and the garage can't be used. What, then, would one use the garage for if - for whatever reason - one opts for a larger dinghy? I suppose it could still be used for dinghy storage once the larger dinghy is deflated, though not quite as intended.
Sure, even if that increment of about 50cms on the 1045 allows you to have a longer one.

Anyway if you like to sail and do it coastal with an inflatable dingy aboard, only if you don't care about sailing and safety the size of the dinghy does not matter. On my previous boat, a 36ft, the 3.4m dingy was too wide and would make things dangerous when you have to go forward with heavy weather. On this one (41ft) I have chose carefully the dingy to allow a safe lateral passage and not interfere with sailing and that it does at the cost of having an "ugly boat". I am pretty sure the dinghy I use could fit on the 1045 garage and that is just a 35ft boat.

Anyway, it is just so more pleasant and efficient to sail without a dingy on the deck that I would give a lot to have a garage on my boat

regards

Paulo
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  #4172  
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Taylor 49 - Farlie 55

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Originally Posted by Faster View Post
Taylor 49 from Brooklin Boatyard, Maine

It looks great and designed by a guy that likes fast boats

The yacht is a lightweight, performance-oriented sloop with a traditional aesthetic above the waterline and a modern underbody below. The yacht was commissioned by a repeat customer of Brooklin Boat Yard, and is scheduled to launch in spring of 2014. The design was developed specifically for single- or double-handed sailing on New England coastal waters as well as occasional competitive racing in a range of classes.

The new yacht is 49 feet overall with a waterline length of 35.1 feet and an 11.6-foot beam. Long overhangs increase the boat’s effective sailing length and stability with heel. This traditional feature is coupled with an underwater canoe body shape that’s rounded with low deadrise for less drag, especially in choppy water and during maneuvers. Her fin keel and spade rudder also reduce wetted area while lowering her vertical center of gravity for increased stability. Since the yacht will sail mostly northeastern ports, her keel’s leading edge is swept aft to shed weeds and lobster pots. Her saildrive features a folding prop to also minimize the risk of fouling.

“The long sailing length and narrow beam will give this design a meter boat feel,” said Jim Taylor, yacht designer. “Her deep, high aspect ratio appendages feature ample profile area, to provide a user-friendly ‘groove’ even when downspeed or in sloppy sea conditions. Her unusual combination of classic style with contemporary performance will set her apart from — and usually far ahead of — everything else on the water.

The boat will be built in cold-molded wood, a style for which Brooklin Boatyard is well-known. This approach not only results in high strength and toughness relative to weight, but it also provides very impressive acoustic and thermal insulation. The yacht will carry a Hall carbon rig and Harken deck gear. Competition Composites Inc. in Canada will build her carbon rudder.

“This yacht is highly customized for her owner and his favorite sailing haunts,” said Steve White, owner of Brooklin Boat Yard. “Not only does she have all the critical details to make her an ideal cruiser/racer for New England, but she’ll be a pleasure to sail — whether day-tripping with grandchildren or racing competitively with a handful of crew.

OA: 49.0′, LWL: 35.1′, BEAM: 11.6″, DRAFT: 7.8′, DISPLACEMENT: 16,500 lbs, BALLAST: 6,830 lbs, IM: 53.0′, J: 15.6′, P: 53.3′,
E: 19.4′, LP%: 142% Genoa, LP%: 95% Self-Tacking Jib

BBY News - Brooklin Boat Yard to Build Custom Jim Taylor-Designed Sloop

and light too even if I would expect more ballast B/D ratio for such a narrow hull.

Competition for the Farlie 55:









I would love to have a look at the interiors. On the Farlie they are nice but on a boat like this I would expect more than nice.

By the way if somebody wants a Farlie 55 they are selling their demonstration boat for a reduced price, only $1,176,150. I would not expect the Taylor to be less expensive, after all the Farlie is a semi-custom boat while the Taylor 49 is a custom boat.

http://www.yachtworld.com/core/listi..._id=76729&url=

and there are some that find mass production modern boats expensive regarding old boats ...but they where a beauty, that's for sure!!!

Regards

Paulo
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  #4173  
Old 05-29-2013
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Bavaria 40 MKII

Talking about inexpensive boats, this one will cost less than 150 000 euros including VAT. From the previous boat this one has only retained the Farr hull, a good one and even the keel and ruder are revised.

The boat looks much more elegant than the previous model and the interior looks brighter and more modern.



I love those 4 winches on the cockpit and this is the only mass production main market cruiser that offers them.

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Last edited by PCP; 05-29-2013 at 05:37 PM.
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  #4174  
Old 05-30-2013
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Cruising: ARC

As you probably know the 2013 was full only some months after the opening of inscriptions. 245 boats was the limit they could manage in what regards marinas in Canary Islands, even after they have expanded the marina.

So they decided to create another one with a different time departure (two weeks earlier), leaving Las Palmas at 10 November and it will go on a parallel course visiting Cape Verde Islands before heading to Saint Lucia arriving just some days earlier than the main rally.

This one is called ARC+

A parallel route to the annual ARC transatlantic rally is being created in November to cope with unprecedented demand for places. Called the ARC+ the event will leave Las Palmas on 10 November, two weeks' earlier than the ARC start, and visit the Cape Verde Islands before heading for Saint Lucia to arrive just ahead of the main fleet. The Rally will be limited to 50 yachts.

But this year, besides ARC this will not be the only other option. There are three more other other cruising rallies this November and December: the new Christmas Caribbean Rally from Lanzarote to Antigua and two others created by ARC founder Jimmy Cornell, the Atlantic Odyssey from Lanzarote to Martinique and Atlantic Odyssey II from Las Palmas to Grenada.

I have never see anything like this, it seems that the number of boats crossing the Atlantic this year will be a record number

Just to go with the mood I will post some movies from boats doing the ARC. By the way there is somebody reading this that will go on one of those?

A First 40.7:



A First 36.7:





an interesting Sam Manuard design, kind of a Pogo 10.50:



a Dehler 36:



a Rival 32:



a Dufour 45e:



a Xp44:




and the 40Class racer Vaquita, the one to arrived first in 2012 beating a Swan 80:







..
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Probably the most beautiful 2013 boat: Pogo 40 S3

Yes, it is not a cruising boat but what can I say, I guess I agree with Conq when he says beauty in sailboats is directed related with efficiency and speed and this one will be faster by 15% than the previous model

15% in speed is huge and expecting that in what regards the previous racing model is just incredible and if that was not subscribed by Verdier I would say they were nuts and even so.... I have some difficulty in accepting that.

the other thing incredible about this boat is price: less than 300 000 euros and for the ones that know what is the average price of a 40ft ocean racing boat will know what I am talking about: This is going to be the fastest long range offshore racer for the buck.

The New Pogo 40 class racer:







The boat has an unusually low freeboard and the design of the transom and the way it is integrated in the hull is just magnificent. Just to look at it I would expect it to be a very fast boat...it just looks right

That is the first time a Pogo is not designed by Finot/Conq. This one is designed by the new kid sensation among French designers, an outsider that has been working alone with sporadic joint work with VPLP. VPLP are top multihull designers and his theory is that monohulls are going so fast that many of the hydrodinamic problems that arise regarding planing has been already solved on multihulls that come to those kind of speeds first and looking to the results of that strange partnership I would say that he is probably right. I am talking about Guillaume verdier the designer of the boat that won the last Vendee but also the one that come in second and the one that would come in third if it had not lost the keel and many more among the fastest Open 60's (With VPLP colaboration).

he designed also some top racing multihulls and is part of the design team of the AC NZ72.

He did not design yet many cruising boats but I bet that is going to change soon: French main boat builders have a tradition to have their boats designed by the best French NA with the best racing curriculum (in what regards designing boats) specially the ones that design solo racers whose experience is more useful in cruising boats that, like solo boats, should be easy to sail and as fast as possible with the limitations of price and a good cruising interior.

guillaume verdier - architecture navale - Introduction Projets

http://www.vplp.fr/flash/index.html
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Last edited by PCP; 05-30-2013 at 08:31 AM.
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  #4176  
Old 05-30-2013
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

I'm drooling!
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  #4177  
Old 05-30-2013
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Re: Probably the most beautiful 2013 boat: Pogo 40 S3

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
He did not design yet many cruising boats but I bet that is going to change soon: French main boat builders have a tradition to have their boats designed by the best French NA with the best racing curriculum (in what regards designing boats) specially the ones that design solo racers whose experience is more useful in cruising boats that, like solo boats, should be easy to sail and as fast as possible with the limitations of price and a good cruising interior.
Paulo - Clearly this is the case, and even so for Beneteau, who enlisted Juan Kouyoumdjian (French/Argentinian, I believe) to design the latest First 30. Don't know if you've commented on that boat, but I don't think Beneteau have had much success with it. Not competitive under IRC (don't know about ORC), but I'm not sure how it has fared (if at all) in offshore competition. It's not that there isn't a market for these types of boats, but perhaps Beneteau customers are more conservative. Perhaps Jeanneau have had more success with the Sunfast 3200?

I'm still too infatuated with the Malango 9.99 and 1045 to get too worked up about the Pogo 40. Perhaps next week.
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  #4178  
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First 30

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Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
Paulo - Clearly this is the case, and even so for Beneteau, who enlisted Juan Kouyoumdjian (French/Argentinian, I believe) to design the latest First 30. Don't know if you've commented on that boat, but I don't think Beneteau have had much success with it. Not competitive under IRC (don't know about ORC), but I'm not sure how it has fared (if at all) in offshore competition. It's not that there isn't a market for these types of boats, but perhaps Beneteau customers are more conservative. Perhaps Jeanneau have had more success with the Sunfast 3200?

...
Yes, I have posted about the First 30 when the boat come to the market, near the beginning of this thread and you are right, not only the 30 is a JK design as the First 35 and 40 are Farr designed, as the previous models. That is a exception, I mean the First, if you look at all other mass market French boats very few (if any) are designed by non French NA.

Regarding the First 30 even if the boat looks great and I love JK as designer that one seems not to be one of his best designs. The rating expected was to be over 1.0 (ORC) but the boat never reached it and was considerably slower to the point of the ones that actually race on top in France have a modified keel with more ballast.

Of course as a cruising boat nothing of this is very important but that is a dual purpose boat and nobody likes to have a boat that does not sail to his rating or is slightly slower than others.

It is not the only one, for instance the Elan 310 that was also received as a great boat by the press never proved as a racer. Note that one thing is racing other cruising. Both boats are nice and fast performance cruisers.

Regarding absolute performances I will post some ORC files that are very informative and close in what regards performance and I am sure that if you look closely at them you will be able to have a good overall picture.

First 30:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12017a.pdf

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12062a.pdf

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12098a.pdf

JPK 10.10:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12048a.pdf

JPK 960:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12069a.pdf

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12088a.pdf

Elan 310:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12027a.pdf

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12057a.pdf

GD Surpise:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12008b.pdf

A31:

http://www.ffvoile.fr/ffv/public/hab...pdf/12150a.pdf

Regards

Paulo
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  #4179  
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Cruising: Atlantic crossing - 10 tips

On the following of that post about the ARC I remember a nice article, mixing good sense with experience, published on Yachting world magazine by Elaine Bunting,

Top 10 tips for an Atlantic crossing:


"1. You don't need a special boat


Time was when a proper bluewater cruiser had chines, a ketch rig and self-steering gear at the stern. That was a perception, and perceptions change. Numerically, the most common transatlantic yachts these days are ordinary production cruisers with standard kit.

There's no black art to sailing 3,000 miles downwind. Generally, the toughest part of an Atlantic crossing is getting across Biscay. So whatever boat you have right now, the chances are that with a bit of extra prep she'll be fine for an Atlantic crossing.

As for a watermaker, generator, SSB radio, etc: they're all useful, but every additional item adds complication and service cost/time. Apart from a sound boat, all you really need is water, food, fuel and a (paper) copy of 'North Atlantic, Southern Part'.


2. Keep it simple


A smart crossing is all about consistent speed, 24 hours a day. The key is not to have downtime.

There's no need to fiddle around with twin headsails, Twistlerig or expensive new asymmetric spinnaker; a main and poled-out genoa 'barn doors' set-up will do fine. In fact, me and my other half won the ARC rally overall one year after sailing wing-and-wing almost the entire way.

Just keep an eye out for chafe, and be sure to set up a preventer on the boom and a foreguy topping lift and downhaul when poling out the headsail so you can furl in quickly when that night-time squall hits (which it will).


3. Revise your energy equation


Whatever power you think you'll use on an ocean crossing, add on another third. Nav lights, radar, radio scheds, autopilot, watermaker, fridge, freezer, computer, fans - you name it, they all add up.

Increase the means of generating electricity with a diesel generator, larger alternator, solar panels and/or a towed turbineandlook at means of making savings, such as fitting LED lights.


4. Get some extra training


Ocean seamanship is more about fixing things and managing problems on board than navigation or routeing. Diesel engine maintenance, sea survival, medical and first aid training and courses run by manufacturers on servicing and maintaining their equipment are all invaluable preparation - for crew as well as skipper.


5. Make the most of your time out


Don't rush the opening stages of your year(s) off; enjoy the great summer cruising on the route down to the Canaries and other hopping-off points. The West Country, France, Northern Spain, Portugal and Madeira could be some of the best places you visit.


7. Go the long way round


Some people spend thousands on routeing software, and that's fine. But you don't need it and if you're not used to using Grib files and don't have polars for your boat, it's of dubious value.

The most reliable passage plan is the simplest and often the quickest: run your latitude down to around 20°N, 30°W before turning right, following the age-old advice to 'head south til the butter melts'.


Here are three reasons to favour this route:
You'll pick up the tradewinds earlier. They often don't kick in properly until halfway across on the rhumb line route.

You'll get nicer conditions. Sometimes the direct route is upwind after the start or there's an uneasy cross sea from a depression to the north

The extra distance is only between 200 and 300 miles

You'll tick off 2-3 degrees of latitude a day, so it will get warmer quicker


8. Take it steady


Don't go all-out at the beginning of a crossing. It takes around three days for a crew to get their sea legs and settle down into a routine.

Just as importantly, your boat will be fully provisioned, fuelled and watered and that's tonnes of extra displacement. The increased loads on the gear and rigging are significant, so throttle back and don't push too hard too early.


9. Prepare for gear failure


Be prepared for key equipment to fail, because sooner or later it will. If it's gear you normally rely on, like an autopilot or watermaker, have a contingency.


10. Don't fix your arrival date in the diary


Some seasons an Atlantic crossing is quick; others it's slow. The weather varies quite a bit this side of Christmas. So if you are fixated on a certain arrival day, you'll be set up for disappointment before you even leave.

Keep your plans open. Remember that the crossing is the adventure, not the arrival in the Caribbean.

And whatever you do, don't let crew book flights immediately after your estimated ETA - nothing sours the atmosphere more than a stressed person on a deadline champing to be on land."


Read more at http://www.yachtingworld.com/blogs/elaine-bunting/41680
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Last edited by PCP; 05-30-2013 at 07:10 PM.
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  #4180  
Old 05-31-2013
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Had the opportunity last night to race on a boat that will never do the ARC or any other ocean crossing - an Ultra 30.



For those not familiar with the Ultra 30, the boat was designed and developed in the late 1990's as a way to bring the thrills and spills of high performance racing to the masses, and lure sponsorship and advertising so as to provide a livelihood for professional sailors. All of these very good goals, which we now see pursued by Larry Ellison and Russell Couts in the current AC72 / AC45 efforts.

The boat itself is basically a carbon skiff with a massive square-top main, 408 kg / 900 lbs of lead bulb on a lifting keel, and aluminium racks for hiking. There are no winches, and the main is trimmed 49er style from the boom. As one can imagine, the boat is extremely weight-sensitive, requiring constant movement to keep it from tipping over. Don't want to guess what the angle of vanishing stability is, but I can tell you it would be very easy to find out in a hurry - if you don't mind swimming.

The boat I sailed on is the reincarnation of the boat in the photo - Team Zombie - relocated to Long Island Sound and de-tuned for casual beer can racing (which seems ridiculous, once you see the boat). The trapezes are now gone (forbidden under LIS PHRF) and the spinnaker is only deployed when fooling around in lighter breeze.

To reduce windage, the nets were removed from the hiking racks, which now sport hiking straps in the absence of trapezes. This makes getting in and out quite the adventure, while there is nothing quite like the feeling of hiking on a hard aluminium tube covered in anti-skid, with no support for thighs or buttocks. Made me appreciate the luxurious comfort of Laser hiking.

For all that, we saw a top speed (SOG) of 10.1 knots last night, in about 8-12 knots of breeze, and were doing steady 7.0-7.5 knots in 6-9 knots close reaching. However, with a PHRF rating of 0.00, we fell victim to a well-sailed Farr 395 (a very nice boat in its own right, and quite quick in light air), a Beneteau 40.7 and a J122 (a Paulo favorite). Not sure if I'll be a regular crew on this boat, given my advanced age and declining health, but it was definitely a fun experience.
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