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  #4211  
Old 06-02-2013
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

My wife comes from Weymouth as well. Salty girls. We are South Shore people as well. Once the stick was put in it was uncertain if the tricolor was working well. Builder went up to look at it. Once he came down she said "What's it like up there? I want to go up" and she did. The locker behind the center back cushion of our Outbound folds down exposing a wine locker ( with cut out holes for the bottles). The back of the locker door becomes a convenient shelf. Good food and one glass can be a morale booster coming off watch.
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  #4212  
Old 06-03-2013
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Traditional boats : Baleeiros

Quote:
Originally Posted by hannah2 View Post
.....
I look forward to a pleasant eating and drinking orgy in Portugal this September when RC LOUISE heads south from Brittany. And I'm pleased to say my wife speaks Portuguese from her years as a doctor in East Africa. I will be emailing Paulo about the finer places to eat along the coast.

.... I always enjoyed the bar brawls on the deep south shore. I walk into the bar, the Portuguese fishermen would recognize you and bingo, black eye and some blood and then buying each other drinks.

Steve, your wife got my consideration. it seems to be one of those souls that like to help the ones that need help. Mozambique is a beautiful country with very nice people. Some of my friends had born there and i have family working there. If your wife does not know him and likes to read talke her about this guy:


We won this year's "Camões" prize that is attributed yearly to the one that is considered the bets writer of Portuguese literature. He is a citizen of Mozambique and I love the way he writes. Nobody describes Africa the way he does. He is white but reading his books you would swear he is black and native...and native he is

This is some poetry even if most of his work is not poetry unless poetry can be written as of it was mot poetry. Mostly shot stories about people and nature.

http://pensador.uol.com.br/autor/mia_couto/

What's that about Portuguese in bar brawls? normally Portuguese are kind of self minded type of guys. They can be though and a pain in the ass but only after being pissed...a lot.

I am going away on the middle of this week and I intend to be away from internet most of the time bit I will try to find time to send you a PM with some suggestions of places to visit and wine and food to eat.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
Paulo - If adding a Portuguese to my crew list will contribute to a wine-friendly boat, then I'll be sure to do so. As it turns out, I spend a fair amount of time up in the New Bedford area, which has a vibrant Portuguese community, primarily due to the commerical fishing industry, which employs many people originally from the Azores. ....
Mr Pelicano,

The beginning of the Portuguese community in new Bedford had to do with whaling fishing. One of the traditional economic activities in Azores was whale fishing and they went doing it as a traditional economic activity till some decades ago. Being New Bedford an industrialized whaling fishing center it attracted whale fishers from Azores looking for a better pay.

On Azores they had done it always on the traditional whaling small sailing boats without any support of bigger boats. The boats were developed by the Basques, the ones the ones that first hunted them on the west.

Today they sail and race the boats for fun:



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Last edited by PCP; 06-03-2013 at 04:41 PM.
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  #4213  
Old 06-03-2013
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
Is it just my imagination or does everyone sailing in Europe wear brand new, top-of-the-line foul weather gear? It seems like in every video I see, people are kitted out in crisp new Musto offshore gear (or Gaastra or SLAM or HH)! I would be embarrassed to show up at a European regatta in my 13-year old Jeantex foulies (a company that is already out of business) and worn out Sperry sea boots. (
Foulies that last more than a few years seem to be bad for business ...
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  #4214  
Old 06-03-2013
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Re: 2013 Solitaire du Figaro, a great solo race.

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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
For the ones that don't know what it is about:

[COLOR="Blue"][B]The Solitaire du Figaro, previously called the Course de l'Aurore, is a solo multi-stage sailing race created in 1970 by Jean-Louis Guillemard and Jean-Michel Barrault. The unique character of the race, the presence of great solo sailors and its being open to amateurs, has made it one of the most cherished races in French sailing.....

The race is split into 4 stages varying from year to year, from the length of the French coast and making up a total of around 1,500 to 2,000 nautical miles (1,700 to 2,300 mi; 2,800 to 3,700 km) on average. Over the years the race has lasted between 10 and 13 days at sea.
Yes indeed. I was very much looking forward to this race, though as you say the start of Leg 1 was not all that exciting yesterday - light conditions as the fleet beat down the river to the Bay of Biscay. The list of competitors is a who's who of major talent, including Yann Elies and Michel Desjoyeux (currently in first and second place), Adrien Hardy, Armel Le Cléac'h (finished second in the Vendée Globe this year), Fredric Duthil, and on and on. This should be a really good event and, so far, it is living up to it - the bulk of the fleet remains clustered within 0-3 miles of each other, after almost 24 hours of racing, in mostly light, downwind conditions (after they got out of the Garonne / Girdonde rivers).

Just to give an idea of how mainstream this is in France, the title sponsor this year is Eric Bompard ("Irresistible Cashmeres"), a well-known brand of fashion wear for women, men and children. Not dissimilar to Hugo Boss sponsoring Alex Thomson's Open 60 campaign, but this is an entire race series. To have something comparable for a sailing event in North America is unthinkable - though perhaps I'm wrong: I believe Nautica sponsors the U.S. Sailing Team for apparel and Nautica Watches was one of the sponsors at Key West Race Week. But I still think the point is valid. The Solitaire de Figaro is about as mainstream a sporting event in France as you could possibly have. And just wait a few more weeks when the Tour de France a la Voile kicks off.

Lest you think that all I do is complain, let me say that I am extremely pleased with the number and quality of Laser regattas scheduled for the Northeast this year. From June to October we will have the Atlantic Coast Championship, the New England Championship, the North American Championship, the North American Masters Championship, the Atlantic Coast Masters Championship, Buzzards Bay, Hyannis, and Sail Newport (and I didn't even mention all the smaller, local regattas). All of these events will attract very big fleets - over 100 boats in many cases - with solid sponsorship and good race organization. It is only when you step up to keel boats that things get depressing and you must then turn to Europe and Australia/NZ for real excitement.
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  #4215  
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2013 Solitaire du Figaro, a great solo race.

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
Yes indeed. I was very much looking forward to this race, though as you say the start of Leg 1 was not all that exciting yesterday - light conditions as the fleet beat down the river to the Bay of Biscay. The list of competitors is a who's who of major talent, including Yann Elies and Michel Desjoyeux (currently in first and second place), Adrien Hardy, Armel Le Cléac'h (finished second in the Vendée Globe this year), Fredric Duthil, and on and on. This should be a really good event and, so far, it is living up to it - the bulk of the fleet remains clustered within 0-3 miles of each other, after almost 24 hours of racing, in mostly light, downwind conditions (after they got out of the Garonne / Girdonde rivers).
...
Yes the level is incredibly high. It would to be expected that major champions like Michel Desjoyeaux (two times Vendee winner) or Armel le Cleach that know is racing big multihulls would not be interested in putting is status on the open fighting on smaller series with young talents and true specialists, like Morvan. They don't care they want to prove they are good, in any kind of boat, not by past victories but for what they can do know. That's the spirit

I know that the level is incredible high because last year a Portuguese champion sailed the Figaro series. He came from the minis where we won several races including the big transat and on the Figaro he was just average, never managing to win a race. The best he could do was coming second on a leg. He leaded several legs but would end up to make some small mistake that pull him to 3th or 4th. Here you can see him on the day he managed 2th. He was beaten over the line by...François Gabart, the winner of the last Vendee globe.




They are almost all professionals and any small mistake and it would be impossible to recover) as the boat is extraordinarily technical to sail and very small variations in sail trim are very important.

Back to the race, it seems that Armel is trying a different tactical approach, nearer the coast as opposed to Nicol a guy that likes to sail in higher winds and are going to look for them.

Le Figaro - La Solitaire

Regards

Paulo
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  #4216  
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Yaka and Dingo

Quote:
Originally Posted by robelz View Post
Is the Yaka 9.50 the civil version of the dingo 9.50? What about its cruising potential? Speed potential?
Marée Haute - Dingo 9.50

Marée Haute - Yaka 9.50

Yes, that's right. The Yaka can have a twin keel configuration but I never saw a Yaka or Dingo 9.50 and I don't know if any was built.

The Yaka and Dingo 6.50 were built.

Here the Yaka 6.50:
















And the Dingo 6.50:





You can see more pictures here:

Ocean racing sailboat (class mini 6.50) - D2 6.50 - 6.5m - 21' 4"ft - Marée Haute

Both boats are designed by Rolland.

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Paulo
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  #4217  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

The Dingo 6.5 is a production series Mini, and has been known to be somewhat competitive in the right hands, though that class is dominated by the Pogo 2, among series boats.

I take it that Yaka is just a more civilized, cruiser-friendly Dingo 6.5, with the twin keels giving it the ability to dry out with the tide.

It would be natural to want to make larger versions of each, I suppose, though it sure seems that space is getting a bit crowded.

As I was taking my midday walk, a short time ago, I came to the conclusion that I will need to schedule a trip to Europe next year to visit the various yards and get a first hand look at the boats that are tempting me, including the Malango 888 and 999, the SeaScape 27, the Archambault 31 (and the new 35 by then), the Dehler 32 and 38, and who knows what else, since in 12 months I expect to see even more new, enticing interesting boats.

Fortunately, this summer I'll get a first-hand look at the soon-to-be-launched J/88!



Now excuse me while I try to scrounge a ride for the 2013 Melges 24 Worlds, in San Francisco.
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  #4218  
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Jpk 10.10

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
...
As I was taking my midday walk, a short time ago, I came to the conclusion that I will need to schedule a trip to Europe next year to visit the various yards and get a first hand look at the boats that are tempting me, including the Malango 888 and 999, the SeaScape 27, the Archambault 31 (and the new 35 by then), the Dehler 32 and 38, and who knows what else, since in 12 months I expect to see even more new, enticing interesting boats.

...
You should not forget the JPK 10.10 and if you are considering a 35/36ft, the new Sunfast 3600 and the JPK 10.80. The two last are still being built and we can only speculate about the performance, but regarding the JPK 10.10, that's a fact.

The Round the Island race with about 1500 sailboats and many top and well sailed boats is a very valuable source of information. As it is a around an Island they will get wind over all directions so the information does not privilege upwind or downwind sailing.

I have started looking at the results and one of the first things that call my attention was the incredibly good JPK 10.10 performance and not only in relative terms since the only two racing made 1st and 2nd in its class but also in absolute terms. Their asolute performance in real time was even more impressive: The fastest has made it in 6h 35m and the other one in 6h 45m. There was plenty J111 racing and I have no doubt that some of them were very well sailed. The fastest had done it in 6h 35m all the others, and they were much more than the JPK, had done a lot worst.

Now, the J111 is not only 1m longer as it is much of a race boat with a schematic interior while the JPK 10.10, while being racing oriented has a nice cruising interior for a top cruiser racer. Besides that the JPK 10.10 is forgiven enough to be solo raced and that would not be the case of the J111, specially downwind.

Look at both boats, first the JPK 10.10 and don't forget that the JPK is more than 3ft smaller and less expensive:

The JPK 10.10:



The J 111:





Now, I am not saying bad things about the J 111, a boat I like very much, a great and very fast one, just comparing its performance with the JPK 10.10 on this race.

Just compare it with the times done by more conventional cruiser racers. You can compare the JPK 10.10 (a 10m boat) with the times of the typical 12m modern performance cruiser...and be prepared for a surprise

Download this spread sheet:

J.P. Morgan Asset Management Round the Island Race - Results for the 2013 race

And I let you with Zulu, anoter JPK 10.10 winning another major race some days ago, this one a different one, a regatta. Yes this boat wins offshore races, regattas, solo races and besides that it has an interior that allow it to cruise. I would say that is difficult to do better.

Chapeau to the designer, J. Valer.



Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 06-03-2013 at 07:24 PM.
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  #4219  
Old 06-04-2013
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Sunfast 3600 - JPK 1080

And since we talked about those two, that are among the most waited boats, let's see what we have more about them.

On Jeanneau they have been promoting the Sunfast 3600 releasing new virtual images...and nice ones:





















On the JPK not so much but even so, some better images:










Both boats are pointing to the Transquadra mainly and IRC racing as a second option but in what regards cruising it seems to me that, as usual, the JPK would have a better interior and not only in quality but by design, specially in what regards the galley and also in what regards storage. Not a question of space but while that storage space on the Sunfast near the bow can be great for head sails, it is not practical for cruising. The space on the cockpit floor seems bigger but the interior aft cabin of the JPK as storage space seems a better overall option to me.

The SunFast:



The JPK:

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Last edited by PCP; 06-04-2013 at 05:47 AM.
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  #4220  
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Re: Sunfast 3600 - JPK 1080

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Both boats are pointing to the Transquadra mainly and IRC racing as a second option but in what regards cruising it seems to me that, as usual, the JPK would have a better interior and not only in quality but by design, specially in what regards the galley and also in what regards storage. Not a question of space but while that storage space on the Sunfast near the bow can be great for head sails, it is not practical for cruising. The space on the cockpit floor seems bigger but the interior aft cabin of the JPK as storage space seems a better overall option to me.

The SunFast:



The JPK:


Both look like very nice designs indeed, Paulo.

They are relatively lightweight and infused sandwich constructions with a comparable and quite high B/D ratio, but the JPK carries 10% more sail for exactly the same hull length.
JPK uses vinylester as resin, resulting in better stiffness and resistance to osmosis (somewhere between the cheaper polyester and the much more expensive epoxy).

I can’t find any information about the keel shape of the Sun Fast, which I find very strange because this is an essential feature for clearly performance oriented boats such as these. So I suppose it will have the same bulb shape the 3200 has?
JPK announces a mixed cast iron/lead keel, straight or with a bulb (option).
Neither builder foresees a retractable or swinging keel, probably because of their racing ambitions. But for cruising the fixed 2.20m draft of both yachts can be quite restrictive for a 36 footer.

I much prefer the retractable bowsprit on the JPK because it is much longer and thus more efficient to carry asymmetric or code sails than the fixed version on the Sun Fast. The latter is cheaper to build but makes boarding when moored bow-to almost impossible without a catway and adds to berthing costs.

The forward storing space on the Sun Fast is probably dictated by the much larger cockpit, bringing the saloon a little forward and leaving insufficient space for a livable front cabin. Apart from the saloon, sleeping is therefore restricted to two aft cabins, with probably very cramped space above the berths because of the very short cockpit seating’s on both designs. Racing crews don’t like cockpit seating’s at all but cruisers certainly do and they also give air and volume to the underlying cabin(s), which is an important feature regarding actual comfort, not only visually .
So in my opinion only the JPK is offering a sufficiently comfortable and dedicated sleeping cabin.
Although I must admit carrying all the extra sails far outside of the keel line disturbs the lateral weight balance, especially on light boats (that’s why I only use the port water tank on our Pogo ) and transporting them through the heads, cabin, cockpit and then all the way to the front deck every time is much, much more laborious than through a deck hatch right up front. But also there you don’t want to carry much weight .

At the drawing stage I already very much like the coach roof design of the JPK. It gives headroom where it is most needed (cabin entry, galley and nav station, hopefully with frontal view!), makes for easy circulation on deck (outboard chainplates mean you must pass below the lowers) and allows a transversal solent rail for better upwind performance.

So at this stage I personally also prefer the design of the JPK from a cruiser/racer point of view, but certainly await the tests and reviews on the water before making an educated judgment. “The proof of the pudding is in the eating” and as we all know, personal tastes can be very, very different .

Kind regards,

Eric

Last edited by EricKLYC; 06-04-2013 at 12:57 PM.
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