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  #4841  
Old 10-28-2013
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Sydney -Hobart 2013

The inscriptions are almost closing and this will be one of the years or the year with more entrants: Between 80 and 90 with 20 from overseas ports.

There are some new boats like the clipper's that had done what I said that the IMOCA and VOR should do, I mean make this race part of one of their legs, or kind of out of the port race

As a big disappointments comes the decision to continue to keep multihulls out. I guess the rich guys don't like multihulls and they want to keep line honors from themselves. I cannot see other explanation after all other classic races have allowed multihulls to race from some years now. They say that they want to maintain the "integrity and safety" of the race

Will those meaningless statements were made an Australian ex-Orma 60ft trimaran had pulverized the Sydney-Hobart record (in February) making a sailing time of one day and six hours, at times surfing downwind at 38 knots.

All this non sense can make an extra race event one as interesting as the race. The two local ex-Orma trimarans will make a particular race out of the race called "Challenge" and they will sail two hours after the fleet leaves Sydney bound to Hobart. I bet they will overtake Wild Oats and other leading boats really close. That will give some fantastic photos and video coverage

Some nice new boats this year like the VOR 70 Groupama now with another ownership and name (Giacomo) but nothing that can beat Wild Oats XI if they have no problem. The only new 100fr entrant is the Matlese Zefiro, but that is no race boat and not a mach to true race boats.

More interesting is the participation of Varuna, a Ker 50 comming from Germany but really fast boats are very few to join the habitual participants and that's a shame.

I would like to see all these big boats there, particularly Esimit Europe, the one I think it would beat Wild Oats...but I really would like to see that match: (starts to be interesting at 8.00m):



I have already posted it here but this is a great movie and if you did not see it don't miss it. A great movie of a great race.

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Last edited by PCP; 10-28-2013 at 09:40 AM.
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  #4842  
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Re: Archambault 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
I haven't been posting much lately as I've been on the road doing some racing. While I was in SF at the Melges 24 Worlds, I had the opportunity to meet the owner of a fairly new Archambault 35. He graciously invited me aboard and gave me the grand tour of his lovely boat, as well as the complete history.

The boat competed in the TransQuadra race, and was then put up for sale in Martinique upon arrival. The current owner flew down with two friends, bought the boat, then sailed it to Florida. It was then trucked across the U.S. to San Francisco and recommissioned.

Unfortunately, during the Richmond YC "Great Pumpkin Regatta", in October 2012, the boat was hit amidships by a Sydney 36 and suffered considerable structural damage. However, after consulting Jim Antrim and the KKMI boat yard, the decision was made to repair the boat, and the insurance company went along with it.

I can tell you, from first hand viewing, that the boat is immaculate. The only way you can tell that any repair work has been done is by the fact that the quality of the repair in several areas is better than the original factory finish in the same area on the other side of the boat.

And as to whether or not the boat's performance was affected, it won its class in the 2013 Rolex St. Francis YC Big Boat Regatta, sailed in typical SF Bay breezy conditions. So it seems that Jim Antrim and KKMI certainly knew what they were doing.

Anyway, all that aside, I was totally impressed with the boat's layout and its massive interior volume for a 35-footer. With tiller steering, the cockpit was luxurious, and suited to racing or simply lounging about with a glass of wine (which is what we were doing). It looked to me like it would be quite dry in open water sailing. Down below was equally spacious and filled with light. The absence of a formal bulkhead separating the forepeak from the rest of the cabin accentuated the sense of space, and you would never feel claustrophobic in this boat. Since it featured a symmetrical spinnaker set-up, there was no sprit box intruding the bow (though the owner indicated that he is considering adding a fixed dolphin nose and switching to A-sails for IRC).

The aft cabin, on the port side, is also roomy and well-ventilated. The heads is on the starboard side, which is basically a large storage / work space. Access to most systems can be had there, while overall engine access from both sides and the front (companionway lifts up) is excellent. I figured you could probably re-build the engine without removing it.

According to the owner, the only thing that is less-than-optimal is the galley layout, where Archambault decided to put two coolers, one to either side of the stove. Looking at the pictures of the galley on the updated A35, due in 2014, they've addressed this issue by removing the cooler on the left of the stove and shifting the stove aft alongside the bulkhead. This creates more countertop space and allows for a larger single cooler.

As noted, the finish quality everywhere on the boat was terrific, and you would never guess the boat had raced across the Atlantic, been trucked across the U.S., then spent nearly a year in the boat yard being structurally repaired.

Indeed, a very interesting boat, and on my short-list of potential performance cruisers I'll be taking a look at when the time comes, particularly when the 2014 model hits the water. Also fond of the A31, which would probably be my preferred choice if I didn't want to go offshore beyond the Caribbean.
Thanks for reviewing. Hope to see some new A35s on the next Transsquadra competing JPSs 1010s and new SF3600s.

I await the new 35 to be cosiderably faster (than the old ones that were slower than the 1010).
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Re: Archambault 35

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
...
Anyway, all that aside, I was totally impressed with the boat's layout and its massive interior volume for a 35-footer. With tiller steering, the cockpit was luxurious, and suited to racing or simply lounging about with a glass of wine (which is what we were doing). It looked to me like it would be quite dry in open water sailing. Down below was equally spacious and filled with light. The absence of a formal bulkhead separating the forepeak from the rest of the cabin accentuated the sense of space, and you would never feel claustrophobic in this boat. Since it featured a symmetrical spinnaker set-up, there was no sprit box intruding the bow (though the owner indicated that he is considering adding a fixed dolphin nose and switching to A-sails for IRC).

The aft cabin, on the port side, is also roomy and well-ventilated. The heads is on the starboard side, which is basically a large storage / work space. Access to most systems can be had there, while overall engine access from both sides and the front (companionway lifts up) is excellent. I figured you could probably re-build the engine without removing it.

According to the owner, the only thing that is less-than-optimal is the galley layout, where Archambault decided to put two coolers, one to either side of the stove. Looking at the pictures of the galley on the updated A35, due in 2014, they've addressed this issue by removing the cooler on the left of the stove and shifting the stove aft alongside the bulkhead. This creates more countertop space and allows for a larger single cooler.

As noted, the finish quality everywhere on the boat was terrific, and you would never guess the boat had raced across the Atlantic, been trucked across the U.S., then spent nearly a year in the boat yard being structurally repaired.

Indeed, a very interesting boat, and on my short-list of potential performance cruisers I'll be taking a look at when the time comes, particularly when the 2014 model hits the water. Also fond of the A31, which would probably be my preferred choice if I didn't want to go offshore beyond the Caribbean.
Ye, I agree but nothing I had no said already. That boat is probably the boat that has won more times the Transquadra and in its ability to be good as solo or duo racer in offshore races and also good in crewed races has also a rival and that is the JPK 10.10. You have to find a way to visit that one two and give us your impressions The JPK 10.10 is winning now more races than the A35 including the huge success that was the overall victory on the Fastnet with a duo crew (father and son)

It seems appropriate to repost this post about the A35 and the new version. It shows what you are sayng.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
I was a bit surprised with that. The boat is a winner, I mean it is still winning everywhere (solo, duo, full crew) and I was thinking how it would be possible to make a better boat.....well it turns out that it is nor really a new boat but an upgrade of the previous one and not only a cosmetic one : They managed to save 150kg making the cabin and deck also using vacuum infusion the technique they used already on the hull.

Talking about the hull, it is the same but curiously they have increased the ballast in 210kg and give it more 10cms of draft. So, diminished weight, more ballast and more draft that means MORE POWER as if the A35 has not already plenty.

Regarding the cosmetic part I am no sure I like more the lines of this one. Maybe the boat looks better than the designs and maybe the better alteration is on the interior, that was already a nice one for a high performance cruiser.

In fact they announce a cruiser and a racer. Maybe the cruiser has a better cruising interior and that would be great because the A35 has already a good cruising interior, in a spartan kind of way.

The new model (drawings) and the older one (photos):















This is going to be a great occasion to buy one of these babies almost new at a discount price. The guys that race this boat seriously on the first league will want the new faster one and the price of the "old" one on the used market is going to come down.

And I saved the best for the end: Archambault was living hard days and it would bankrupt if it was not saved in extremis by a new investor. It seems that things are going well and I am sure this upgrade will be a success making even better a great boat.

....
And indeed, they have showed some drawings of the new interior and if the real thing looks as well, the new interior is even better, in what regards a cruising utilization.





Regards

Paulo
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Last edited by PCP; 10-28-2013 at 10:12 AM.
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  #4844  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Amazing <3

Looks way nicer than the 10.10 (to be fair we have to wait for the 1080)...
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  #4845  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by robelz View Post
Amazing <3

Looks way nicer than the 10.10 (to be fair we have to wait for the 1080)...
I think what surprised me most about the A35 was simply how large it is for a 35-foot boat. I've sailed on a lot of 35-foot boats, including J/109s, J/105s, 1D35s, Santana 35s, etc., and the A35 felt bigger than all of them, except perhaps the 1D35, which is a pure race boat. In the photos you don't really get a good sense of how big it is.

One thing is certain, the owner of the boat I toured loved his boat. I probably spent an hour peering into every corner and listening to him extoll its virtues non-stop. The U.S. dealer (if there is one) needs to fly this fellow to boat shows and let him talk - they will sell a lot of these boats.

By contrast, none of the J/109 owners I've sailed with were this enthusiastic about their boats. But maybe it's just traditional J/Boat owner personality.
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  #4846  
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrPelicano View Post
...
By contrast, none of the J/109 owners I've sailed with were this enthusiastic about their boats. But maybe it's just traditional J/Boat owner personality.
J109 is an older slower boat. Try J111 owners

These guys scream of joy



However I don't think the J111 is as adapted as the A35 (or the JPK 10.10) to solo or short crew sailing, specially downwind. I don't imagine a guy going relatively fast downwind at the J111 while sleeping

Regards

Paulo
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Great video!
Similar conditions on a J/109 - never able to obtain those speeds, not even close.
The boat loads up and feels like it's going to explode but keeps plodding along...
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The last sail "news" - movie

Great sailing images





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  #4849  
Old 10-29-2013
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On Design: market tendencies and mechanical systems.

On another thread there was an interesting discussion in what regards the relation between size of a boat and seaworthiness and also in what regards mechanical helps.

Some would think that will not apply to fast performance cruisers, at least in a significant way, I mean mechanical help and automatic systems but they are plain wrong. Sailing speed is related with size of the boat and if you really want a very fast boat then you want a big boat. Big boats needed a big crew to be sailed and that's a problem. Well not anymore, the problem is the extra money to buy complex systems and eventually more reliability problems even if the huge number of big sailing boats using these systems will contribute to a much improved reliability that seems already quite reasonable.

Have a look at what I am saying: This Swan 60 should have big grinders to be sail fast. Instead it has a lot of buttons.

have a good look at that mainsheet and boom controls. We don't see any big and complicated purchase system. The lines come clean from the boom.





They say about the Swan 60 set up and particularly about the above boat (that has been doing very well racing):

"Race-optimized versions, like Emma, have a racing boom rather than the Park Avenue style that comes on the cruising version. However, Emma is equipped with a Magic-Trim system that does away with the traveller, drastically reducing mainsail trim options. A racing mainsheet system is available as part of the optional $35,000 competition package.

On deck, sophisticated sail control systems and an ergonomically designed layout allow the Swan 60 to be easily sailed by just three people. The Magic-Trim mainsheet is a very safe innovation for cruisers, as it has no exposed finger-jamming blocks and includes a quick release that allows the main to be dumped in response to a large gust or when bearing away......All winches on board are electric, enabling effortless sail trimming and creating an uncluttered central cockpit devoid of pedestal grinders."


Flagship: Best Boats Swan 60 | Sail Magazine

The supplier of the Swan mainsheet system is Cariboni. you can have a look at the hydraulic purchase system and also to the the boats that use this suplier system from this supplier. This will give an idea of how expanded is its use among not only big yachts but big yachts that race extensively.

Cariboni - Marine Hydraulic Systems

Cariboni - Marine Hydraulic Systems

Wally uses the same system:



We will have to get used to more complex sailboats at least in what regards bigger sailboats. That's the only way they can be sailed by a couple or a very short crew and that's such a big advantage that justifies the use of more complex systems that have no reason not to be reliable given time and development...only more expensive
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Last edited by PCP; 10-29-2013 at 07:56 AM.
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Re: On Design: market tendencies and mechanical systems.

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
On another thread there was an interesting discussion in what regards the relation between size of a boat and seaworthiness and also in what regards mechanical helps.

Some would think that will not apply to fast performance cruisers, at least in a significant way, I mean mechanical help and automatic systems but they are plain wrong. Sailing speed is related with size of the boat and if you really want a very fast boat then you want a big boat. Big boats needed a big crew to be sailed and that's a problem. Well not anymore, the problem is the extra money to buy complex systems and eventually more reliability problems even if the huge number of big sailing boats using these systems will contribute to a much improved reliability that seems already quite reasonable.

Have a look at what I am saying: This Swan 60 should have big grinders to be sail fast. Instead it has a lot of buttons.

have a good look at that mainsheet and boom controls. We don't see any big and complicated purchase system. The lines come clean from the boom.


They say about the Swan 60 set up and particularly about the above boat (that has been doing very well racing):

"Race-optimized versions, like Emma, have a racing boom rather than the Park Avenue style that comes on the cruising version. However, Emma is equipped with a Magic-Trim system that does away with the traveller, drastically reducing mainsail trim options. A racing mainsheet system is available as part of the optional $35,000 competition package.

On deck, sophisticated sail control systems and an ergonomically designed layout allow the Swan 60 to be easily sailed by just three people. The Magic-Trim mainsheet is a very safe innovation for cruisers, as it has no exposed finger-jamming blocks and includes a quick release that allows the main to be dumped in response to a large gust or when bearing away......All winches on board are electric, enabling effortless sail trimming and creating an uncluttered central cockpit devoid of pedestal grinders."


The supplier of the Swan mainsheet system is Cariboni. you can have a look at the hydraulic purchase system and also to the the boats that use this suplier system from this supplier. This will give an idea of how expanded is its use among not only big yachts but big yachts that race extensively.

Wally uses the same system:

We will have to get used to more complex sailboats at least in what regards bigger sailboats. That's the only way they can be sailed by a couple or a very short crew and that's such a big advantage that justifies the use of more complex systems that have no reason not to be reliable given time and development...only more expensive
The very successful SF-based Mills' designed King 40 Soozal was optimized by Easom Rigging with electric mainsheet winches which, surprisingly, were not penalized under IRC - or at least not sufficiently to prevent installation or compromise winning performance.

I think the chief hurdle to using these systems in smaller boats - e.g., under 40'-50' - is likely to be power consumption. Admittedly, in cruising boats you don't typically trim your sails all that much, so presumably you wouldn't drain your batteries by using electric main sheet, primary and secondary winches, but in performance cruising mode you'd probably suck some amps, particularly if you're shorthanded and running autohelm, AIS and other instruments.

So, probably need to see continuing improvements in power generation and storage before these systems become ubiquitous. And, of course, there's always that underlying issue about electricity and salt water - you'll need to have some kind of manual back-up solution in the event you lose power.

Interesting stuff.
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