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  #511  
Old 01-09-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by myocean View Post
Absolutely. However this is mostly a question of attitude towards life. You don't NEED all the stuff.
I mentioned the washing machine deliberately – I knew it would get your juices flowing
(In reality, it is no major factor either in weight or space). I don’t want to derail this thread, it is too fun to watch the many good boats. I used to live in Australia and love travelling light, ultra light. You have to decide on either “light” or else “full survival mode.” It’s the in-between that kills you, with insufficient equipment yet little mobility.

My remarks are flavoured by where I sail, mostly in higher latitudes, and here “light” is not an easy option. You have to rely on good shore facilities, and they're often not. You need clothing and heating, there’s no compromise. And your boat must be ready for a storm in inhospitable weather. Sailing from a wide open cockpit can be more than you as a mere mortal will endure – one reason why tiller steering has little going for it.

A quick note on “speed,” another observation from the ARC Dragonfly sailors: “You will find good reaching conditions in less than 5 % of the race.” I have sailed two very similar trips from Biscay to Scandinavia, once in my Ovni and once in an Italian job almost 6ft longer and designed to compete with X-Yachts. Oh, it was elegant! On flat seas the first day I was impressed when it sailed near wind speed at 8 knots, but then wind and waves built and it slowed to a crawl, bashed and stalled into the seas. The greater heel made it uncomfortable, and we gave up on hot meals. After 2-3 days of this we needed an overnight break in harbor. The trip took two days longer than in the Ovni.

Also, consider crew. The Pogo 10.50 is certainly an “offshore-going” boat, but that does not make it a “cruiser.” On a perfect day I envy guys in their Open 40s, but after 18 hours of single-handing, preparing a few meals and still not feeling tired, I thank my 395. It is not on Day One you know that you’ve got a cruising yacht; it is after ten days or more. If you count on having ample crew on easy 2-4 hour watches all the way, by all means sail a Pogo. If not, consider how to sail it when exhausted and the weather builds.

Enough from me on this. Bring on more boats, please!
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  #512  
Old 01-09-2011
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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
And if you think I am mad or that is no way to make a passage.Paulo
I don't think you are. Hell, people have crossed the Atlantic in a rowing boat (although for safety they must be accompanied). I highly recommend an old book titled "Jack the Crow." It is hilarious and describes one guy's voyage from the English waterways to the Black Sea in a Mirror Dinghy.

All I suggest is that people who go cruising know precisely what they planned for, and not leap for a "fast" boat hoping the negatives will go away. At least once a month I ache for a real screamer - a 14ft beach trimaran was the most fun I have had - but I think it will have to be my second boat, if I can afford it.
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  #513  
Old 01-09-2011
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Originally Posted by OsmundL View Post
All I suggest is that people who go cruising know precisely what they planned for, and not leap for a "fast" boat hoping the negatives will go away.
You are absolutely right with that. Your thoughts are very important!
Ulf
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  #514  
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The new Volkswagen

Back on topic: here is a new boat that will raise some eyebrows, the Varianta 44. You will first dismiss it for the hideous green interior (I hope they give us alternatives), then for the spartan interior – it looks like a hospital – and finally for the sparse rig and equipment – it does not even sport a roller furler or an anchor locker, though they have a solution for the anchor. Another first: you buy it off the Internet.

All your gripes come, I suggest, before the price is mentioned: starting at 100,000€ ($130,000) for a brand new 44 footer in sailaway condition with a 40hp Volvo? It comes from the Hanse group, also owner of Dehler and Moody, and it fills the void for a “project” boat, one that is basically sound at a super low price point, where you can add things later. Before you dismiss it as “basic”, consider how much easier it is to bring this one up to a personal standard, compared with trying to fix an old second-hand boat?

The hull is essentially a Hanse 430, it is a Judel/Vrolijk design – enough said? I don’t think its sail performance will be too shabby. It is a shoe-in for sailing schools, and some have already ordered. On the site you’ll find specs, polar diagrams and the first tests, and they’ll have it at the Dusseldorf show.

Varianta Segelyachten - from Dehler with love

Personally, I fall for the stark interior. Teak lovers will loathe it, but cloth shelving is adequate, and you can improve on it if you wish. I just hope one can choose coconuts instead of bananas for the artistic “décor.”
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  #515  
Old 01-10-2011
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sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Not a very realistic photo of the cabin interior, since those pears and apples would be bound for the floor as soon as the boat got underway more likely than not... unless it was very, very calm.

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  #516  
Old 01-11-2011
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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Yes, we have already talked and posted about it on this thread.
Shoot me. I thought I'd read this thread from end to end. Never again whisky for Christmas! Now I must go back to see what else I've missed. Could I interest any of you in the Presto 30? What year is it? 2010 soon?
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  #517  
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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
By the way, your Avatar, the Frog (Sapo) it is a popular character here. Paulo
That is not an avatar. It is how I look!
Brilliant videos, thank you.

Sorry about the Presto - it was a poor hint at a joke. (I had read lots about it in this thread, and when I pretended not to know that, it was a way of saying: "Me OsmundL, me stupid."

To be serious, I'll be back with some boats shortly.
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  #518  
Old 01-11-2011
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Hammerhead 35

The Hammerhead 35 seems to get a lot of attention at the London Boat Show (not to be confused with Hammerhead 34, a multihull that you’ve already shown in this thread).

The builder’s description of the interior is an interesting perspective on the differing perceptions of “luxury.” The builder says: “the finish of the Hammerhead 35 is focused on supreme luxury” and speaks of “the mirror smooth surfaces.” It works for me, but for many the lack of wood is often a sign of the opposite, of saving and a lack of detail. As a totally subjective opinion I wonder if we should not consider the stark environment of the sea and be more open to looks like the HM35 – it is after all very easy to look after? Also, it reduces the number of screws and joints.

On the outside, most would approve of the sleek design – it looks fast even before you cast off. It is obviously intended to be fast, complete with a canting keel, maximised waterlength and a mean bowsprit. Looking at the unfinished hull, note the pronounced stepping from the bow.

There’s a rich selection of high-tech materials in the construction, and it seems well equipped in standard form. Lots more detail to be found at:
Gower Yachts - Home of the Hammerhead 35

Please tell me you haven’t already covered HM35
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  #519  
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They don't come smaller?

Spotted this one at yachtpals, as photo of the week. No, it has not been Photoshopped!

It is a real boat, and claimed to be as small as a keelboat can be and still fit an adult, at under 8ft total length. It has a purpose, too: especially good for disabled sailors, a fleet of these compete in the Paralympics.

What struck me was that some of our members might see another advantage: “Sorry darling, I would love to bring you along, but there just isn’t room.”
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  #520  
Old 01-11-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by OsmundL View Post
Spotted this one at yachtpals, as photo of the week. No, it has not been Photoshopped!

It is a real boat, and claimed to be as small as a keelboat can be and still fit an adult, at under 8ft total length. It has a purpose, too: especially good for disabled sailors, a fleet of these compete in the Paralympics.

What struck me was that some of our members might see another advantage: “Sorry darling, I would love to bring you along, but there just isn’t room.”

There have been various renditions of these 'mini 12's" modeled on the old 12 meter AC boats... Last time we were in Victoria the RVicYC had a fleet of a dozen or so, and regular weekly 'regattas'. They look like fun but probably kinda wet!!
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