Interesting Sailboats - Page 566 - SailNet Community
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post #5651 of 6763 Old 01-07-2014 Thread Starter
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Masetati / Ericsson 4

Quote:
Originally Posted by robelz View Post
As I wrote they gave it a longer keel (with a lighter bulb) so a) a part of the weight reduction comes from the keel and b) they obviously redesigned the keel...
Here are they, or should I say here it is the boat:



In fact it seems that the bulb is slightly pulled aft.

Regarding draft there is a 0.8m difference but as you recall there was a big fight at the time because measures arbitrarily obliged the Ericsson 4 keel to be modified (in JK opinion) taking out 350kg from the bulb.

So in fact if we join those kgs to the ones that a bulb positioned 80cms lower will save, it is possible that we reach about 1000kgs. Maybe a lighter mast would have helped to save some kgs too. I believe Vimes is correct in saying that in what regards the hull no significant savings were possible.





Regards

Paulo


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post #5652 of 6763 Old 01-07-2014 Thread Starter
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Stanley Paris in trouble

Loss of Sail and Injury:

"New Years Eve started out well, but by early morning the wind picked up and I was caught with a light headwind sail, which was in danger of being overloaded. On several occasions I had to take the helm. It was a scary situation and no sleep for me. The 1/2 bottle of champagne to celebrate the new year had not been touched. Finally at 4:00 am, a gust blew out the sail and torn fabric filled the air with a swooshing sound. It was dark and there was nothing I could do but watch the sail self destruct. Come dawn, I started the long process of getting the sail down and on deck before stuffing it away below. This would have been too dangerous to do at night. It is a pile of scraps.

While pulling on some pieces stuck in the shrouds, one piece suddenly gave way and I fell flat on my back onto an extrusion of the deck. The pain just below my left scapula was in as much as any pain I have ever experienced. I lay still for a few minutes testing my lungs and then started to get going. I could feel a rib cracking in my back. Crawling was out, as my left arm could take no weight. A few more actions and I collapsed for several hours in the cockpit.

Today, three days later, I am doing better, but am very limited with what I can do with the left arm. It’s getting better and will take a few more days before some of the needed tasks on the boat can be attended to. I am now sailing conservatively and gently, until such time as I am ready again and can attend to a number of tasks...."






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Mini racing

Another great movie taken on the last transat, Cape Finisterra to be precise.



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Mini racer beached:

That is the second time I see a mini racer violently beached....and get away with it. This one, after a failed attempt to tow it was just pulled up by an helicopter and put on the sea again were it was towed (they had took the mast out). Impressive



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Re: Mini racing

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Originally Posted by PCP View Post
Another great movie taken on the last transat, Cape Finisterra to be precise.

I have to confess that as I was watching this video I kept thinking: "Why doesn't he put up the A5 spinnaker?" And I had to keep reminding myself that it's blowing like stink and the sea state is a bit confused - not the best recipe for flying the kite when you're only a few days into the race.

But then I'm thinking: "Somewhere out there Pedote, Belloir, Mettraux, Marie, etc., all probably have spinnakers up."

So, I don't believe I have what it takes to be a competitive Mini racer.

We deal in lead, friend.
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post #5656 of 6763 Old 01-08-2014 Thread Starter
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

You are crazy The guy is saying that he had just taken the Spi out, almost 40K of wind, the small boat doing what seems to be 16K in a very disorganized sea and you want to fly the spy?

You should be racing these babies

Regards

Paulo
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Transaquadra: Twenty years of racing (amateur transat)


20 ans, le bel âge de la Transquadra! por overlapprod


News about the Transquadra: the racing solo or duo Transat for amateurs with more than 40 years of age.

More than 80 boats are already in and the number is growing rapidly.

They have made the type of boats more uniform in what regards performance and they will have for the first time an overall classification in real time.

The handicaps allowed were shortened and now they are between 0.949 < TCC-IRC < 1,051 (previously the max allowed was 1,074). That means that boats that were preciously allowed like the J122, Opium 39, Pogo 10.50 are not allowed anymore.

Besides that the boats have to be class A, a hull length between 8,50 m and 12.50 m, having a fixed engine able to push them at 5K and be in accordance with Special Offshore l’ISAF, cat. 1.

Some of the boats that will be competing: Sun Fast 3200 (several), Sunfast 3600, A 35 (several), JPK 10.10 (several), J109, Pogo 30, Elan 350 (several), JPK 9.60 (several), Grand Soleil 37, A31 (several), First 30, Mat 10.10, Dehler 36, Mistral 9.50, Malango 8.88, Sormiou 29 (several), RM 10.60, Bongo 9.60, First 40.7, Azzure 40, Fabulo 36

Only one SF 3600 and none JPK 10.80. Maybe they will appear later. Anyway, lots of interesting boats

http://www.transquadra.com/documenta...i%202012.1.pdf

Transquadra 2014-2015 | Transat solitaire et double r?serv?e aux amateurs.
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post #5658 of 6763 Old 01-08-2014
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Re: Interesting Sailboats

dudley dix and his crew from Black Cat is back to cape town, after they have lost there rudder, rigged a jury rudder and tried to make there way to saldhana bay it got even worse:
Quote:
Sean, a surfer like me, says that he suddenly felt the same feeling as when caught inside the impact zone of a big surf break, where you have no way of escaping the beating that is about to be dealt to you and you just have to take it on the head and cope with it. In the darkness he did not see the wave coming but became aware of it as it loomed over the boat. It was very large and broke as a hollow tubing wave copmpletely enveloping "Black Cat". She rose up the face of the wave, rotating as she rose until she was hanging from the roof of the tube. Then she fell or was thrown down the face of the wave with the mast going in first. The crash that I heard inside the boat must have been the cabin and deck hitting the water. While this was happening I also looked into the cockpit for Sean and he was hanging from a winch or whatever he had been able to grab as the wave reared up. I required that all crew be hooked on with safety harnesses before going on deck but Sean was hanging on so tight that his harness had no work to do.
they did not loose their mast apparently, so i guess that the wave must have been a real monster lifting the boat high enough so that the forces on the mast were bearable for it...
full story hear:
Dudley Dix Yacht Design
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Dudley Dix - Didi 38

They had almost no ruder, lost previously and were rolled on that wave.

Dudley Dix gives another view, from the inside of the boat:

....
Feeling a bit over-powered in the squalls we were reefing the mainsail when a squall of somewhat over 40 knots hit us. We were now entering the SW winds behind the front, so I changed from our westerly course to a NW heading, taking pressure off the sails. Despite that, the wind over the deck increased to over 50 knots and shredded our new carbon jib, leaving us under main only.

While changing from the #1 jib to the smaller #3, we were running before and gaining speed rapidly. Wavy was standing on the foredeck at the forestay, hauling down the tatters of the jib when we took off down a wave, accelerating to about 20 knots. The waves were very short and steep and we ran stright into the back of the next wave, washing Wavy aft against the shrouds, spraining his ankle and inflating his automatic life-jacket. At the same time the tiller went sloppy in my hands. Although "Black Cat" was running fast and straight down the wave she was doing it on her own, we had no steering.

We dropped all sail and elected to sit out the worsening conditions before setting up a jury rudder to take us back to Cape Town. "Black Cat" was comfortable and in no danger. While we waited we saw the German entry "Iskareen" sail past from behind. We thought that this very fast boat was ahead of us so it came as a surprise to see them come past.

The wind and sea moderated quite quickly from that first storm and we put our minds to making a jury rudder. Sean Collins went over onto the sugar-scoop to screw and strap it to the stub of the rudder that remained below the pintels. It worked reasonably but we treated it gingerly for fear of breaking it. We motored on a heading for Cape Town but as the day progressed the conditions slowly deteriorated as a second storm started to move in. I saw that we were not going to lay Cape Town so elected to rather head for the closer and easier Saldanha Bay.

As the night went on this storm grew progressively more violent. We were in the SW quadrant of the storm about which the weatherman had warned us. We had no desire to be in that position at that time but we had no choice in the matter. Fate had placed us there and we could only do our best to cope with the situation as it developed.

Around 3am there was a massive bang, a noise that sounded like the boat being ripped apart. Sean shouted a warning from the cockpit that I can't repeat in present company. Suddenly we were upside down and the cabin was filled with flying bodies and objects that were loose in the cabin and also those that were inside closed and latched lockers. I had been sleeping on the starboard saloon settee and had only a few seconds earlier stood up to walk aft to the cockpit. I was still in the saloon and was hit on my face and top of my head by unidentified flying debris, leaving me with cuts and a black eye.

The noise of this impact was so great and our up-turned position so alarming that I thought that the keel had come off. I was on the cabin roof and looked up at the bilge, all cabin soles having fallen out. I saw no gaping hole as I expected but shouted "Everybody out!!", still thinking that we had no keel. This all happened in a few seconds, then suddenly she was upright again and I knew that we still had a keel. We were left with an awful mess of food packages, cabin sole panels, tumblers, containers and anything else that managed to find its way out of its alloted place. And there was water everywhere. There had been some in the bilge but a lot more had come in through the companion hatch and a hole that we had no yet identified.

With no instruction from anyone this very capable crew automatically set about sorting out the chaos, first picking up anything that could block the bilge pumps before starting to pump out the water. The day fridge, which had been bolted into the saloon table, had relocated itself to the settee on which I had been lying only 30 seconds earlier. Three fire extinguishers, mounted in brackets from which they are removed vertically, all fell out when we were inverted and flew across to the starboard side of the cabin. Only two of the five onboard were in steel straps with locking mechanisms that held them firmly in place, the other three fell out and became lethal missiles.

Next we discovered what the hole was that had appeared in the deck. During the inversion process the tail of the mainsheet went over the side and attached itself to the propeller and wound itself up to the point that it stopped the diesel motor. It had so much tension in it that the force downward on the upper guardrail wire punched the nearest stanchion through the 12mm plywood deck. That left a hole about 75mm diameter into the locker below, where my clothes were. From there the water spread itself all over the starboard aft cabin, soaking everything that Wavy and I had in that cabin. That was all of our clothes, bedding, camera bags etc.

Of more consequence, the volume of water that came into the boat spread itself over the chart table, the lid of which had ripped right off, and into the electrical panel and electronics. The two satellite phones and main VHF radio were drowned, leaving us with only a hand-held VHF of limited range with which to communicate. Smelling smoke, Wavy opened the electrical panel to see smoke coming out but it didn't develop into a fire.

Time stands still in these situations. I have no idea how long it took us to clean up the boat but she was back to a semblence of ship-shape before too long. The hole in the deck was plugged as well as possible with some muti that we had brought onboard the day before the race start.

In the midst of all this Sean came down from the cockpit and described what had happened. From inside the boat we had no idea, it was just massive noise and upside-downness.

.....

This wave was much bigger and more violent than any others we had felt or seen. If that one could clobber us there may also be others, so we streamed warps from the bow and deployed the storm jib as a sea anchor to try to hold her bow-on to the waves. These did not seem to help much because the underwater current seemed to be pretty much the same speed as our drift. We didn't get her to lie more than about 20-25 degrees from broadside-on to the waves but it seemed to be enough to ease the motion a bit and cause other breaking waves to roll past the port quarter instead of hitting us amidships.

The worsening storm and loss of major communications prompted us to ask Cape Town Radio to put out a Pan-Pan message on our behalf to warn of our location in the shipping lane and to ask for the NSRI (National Sea Rescue Institute) to be called to our assistance. We advised that we were in no immediate danger but would appreciate assistance when it could be provided....

In the morning conditions again subsided. Wavy went over the side in his diving gear to free the mainsheet from the prop, which allowed us to restart the motor. A new and improved version of the jury rudder was fabricated from plywood cannibalised from the lazarette and we continued on our journey toward Saldanha Bay at 4-5 knots under our own power. Early afternoon the NSRI Rescue 3 arrived from Cape Town. They offered us the choice of continuing under our own steam to Saldanha Bay or accepting their tow back to Cape Town.

We took the tow and headed for Cape Town at 10 knots. Manoeuvring into the RCYC basin proved to be more difficult than anticipated because the jury rudder boards added to the starboard side of the rudder severly limited rudder movement in that direction. Add a pomping SE gale and we sorely needed the welcoming hands on the dock to catch us as we came in at rather high speed and with negligible control.....

My big question out of all of this was "Why did the rudder break?". It had a solid Iroko spine nearly 100mm thick and 150mm wide, extending top to bottom, with plywood fairing to leading and trailing edges. That is a massive piece of timber that really should not have been broken by a 20 knot surf. The answer came from the owner, Adrian Pearson.

He told me that when "Black Cat" was squeezed between the steel marinas a few weeks ago when the mooring chains broke, it was not only the hull and keel that were damaged. He said that the rudder was also "graunched". If that is so, it may have started a fracture of the rudder spine that culminated in the blade shearing off at high speed.....

And a big thank you must also go to our Didi 38 "Black Cat". She took a hammering on our behalf and came through with negligible damage."

Dudley Dix Yacht Design


Great story...tough sailors on that boat and fast ones too. They said that they were ahead of that M34 that is making a fantastic race. T

Rogue waves seem to be more frequent. Two days ago, with a forecast prevision of 40 to 50m waves on the shore, two giant waves come in and made a huge havoc on the Portuguese shore. Entire restaurants disappeared in the sea, boats were town to land others sunk.


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Re: Interesting Sailboats

Quote:
Originally Posted by PCP View Post
You are crazy The guy is saying that he had just taken the Spi out, almost 40K of wind, the small boat doing what seems to be 16K in a very disorganized sea and you want to fly the spy?

You should be racing these babies

Regards

Paulo
Yes, that's what I heard him say. But there is one part of my brain saying: "Put the spi back up!" and another side saying: "This is crazy! How far am I from Cascais and a hot shower?"

If I do the first, then I am in the class of Marie and Pedote. If I do the second, then I am closer to being myself.

We deal in lead, friend.
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