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  #11  
Old 03-03-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnRPollard View Post
The Scot would be a great choice for more protected waters. I have sailed them extensively and they are great boats that deliver a lot of fun in a stable platform and they hold their value. Nice for larger rivers, lakes, and sheltered bays.

But I don't think I'd play with one on Buzzards Bay or Vineyard Sound if it was blowing much. It can get pretty lumpy out there

Would you consider any of the smaller catboats from Areys Pond or Marshall? They are very suited to the larger bays (like Duxbury, Pleasant Bay, etc) and are more capable of comfortably tackling something like Vineyard Sound.

P.S. The biggest problem with the J-24 is the fixed keel. Very tricky to launch that boat on a ramp. Can be done, but it's not the sort of thing to make for a spontaneous, relaxed daysail. A centerboard or lifting keel is very advantageous for trailer launching, along with a kick-up rudder.


I can picture what you mean, could get very wet with the Bay chop. Our house is near North, Cotuit and West Bays (protected bays), before they open out into the sound, which I'm sure would be fine, and I wouldn't plan on taking out the family if it was blowing hard, but of course I'd like the option of going out to more open water, and I'm sure I'm entirely capable of misreading weather patterns and getting caught out in more than the boat can handle comfortably. Wouldn't want to freak out the little one...


I would actually consider the Cat, I have always been drawn to classic looking boats, but I'm intimidated by wood, and though I've never sailed a Cat, I wonder if it would feel like a slug. Have you had experience with these boats? Would love to hear more...


Thanks for the J-24 tips. I'm over it. Don't need the launching challenges...

Thanks for your help!

Last edited by jakmedic; 03-03-2010 at 09:23 PM. Reason: Messy
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  #12  
Old 03-03-2010
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Thanks "TheFrog"...

I'll cross Lightning and Thistle off my list just because of the lack of bench seats, necessary for my little one. Thanks for the heads-up...

Harpoon and Flying Scot both still sound great, though I understand the problem with them in much weather, which is a concern. I didn't want to pursue a larger boat with a real cabin, as I wanted to keep things simple with trailering and launching, etc, but maybe I should rethink that. The web link you gave me didn't work. I'll PM you with more Q's as I think of them, thanks...
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Old 03-03-2010
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We love our O'day Daysailer. Great for the kids, stable, easy to learn on and trailer. Make sure you get one that has a tabernacle for the mast for ease of mast stepping. They are very affordable at 2 grand. DaySailer.org
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Old 03-03-2010
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We love our O'day Daysailer. Great for the kids, stable, easy to learn on and trailer. Make sure you get one that has a tabernacle for the mast for ease of mast stepping. They are very affordable at 2 grand. DaySailer.org
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Old 03-03-2010
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Lightbulb Another one to consider

We used to trailer our 1980 Ranger 20 all around the NW for five years. Spent two or three nights at a time on it. There is still an active fleet in Portland.
A wonderful-sailing Ray Richards design, and with about 600 built they are not too difficult to find in the western half of the US.
Good ones usually sell for under 4K, and average ones for half that, nowadays.

L
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  #16  
Old 03-03-2010
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On the "small but stout" side, consider the Compacs (16, 19, or Catboats); the Potter 19; the Newport 17; the Sanibel 17; the Mongomery boats; and a wee sweet outside chance, the Wayfarer dinghy. People have sailed these across the Irish sea and Gulf of Alaska. They are immensely capable little boats. Bit wet, of course; any small boat is going to be wet in Buzzards Bay chop.



As others have said, the Catalina 22 is always a good choice. A cabin is handy with little ones on longer trips, so they have a place out of the sun to nap. The SJ21 is tight belowdecks and not a boat I'd care to caught offshore in, but ours unfailingly pastes a smile on my face. Dead easy to rig and launch. Sails like a dinghy, nice big cockpit, costs around $2500.
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Last edited by bobmcgov; 03-03-2010 at 11:56 PM.
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Old 03-04-2010
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I'd second the O'Day Daysailer. They're still being made and you can still get parts for them.
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  #18  
Old 03-04-2010
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A few ideas

I own a Scot, and would encourage you to keep shopping around. You should be able to find a perfectly sound used boat for 5 grand. The Harpoon is a nice boat, fits your needs, but they're increasingly hard to find. Daysailor also is a good fit. Rhodes 19 is a great boat ... if you're going to be trailering, look for a centerboard model. If you want to moor, the keel model will give you extra stability for your sometimes lumpy sailing grounds. And someone has also mentioned the Catalina 22, another good choice.

If you want to chat about the Scot, don't hesitate to write to me privately.

Good luck.

Kurt
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  #19  
Old 03-04-2010
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jakmedic View Post
I can picture what you mean, could get very wet with the Bay chop. Our house is near North, Cotuit and West Bays (protected bays), before they open out into the sound, which I'm sure would be fine, and I wouldn't plan on taking out the family if it was blowing hard, but of course I'd like the option of going out to more open water, and I'm sure I'm entirely capable of misreading weather patterns and getting caught out in more than the boat can handle comfortably. Wouldn't want to freak out the little one...


I would actually consider the Cat, I have always been drawn to classic looking boats, but I'm intimidated by wood, and though I've never sailed a Cat, I wonder if it would feel like a slug. Have you had experience with these boats? Would love to hear more...


Thanks for the J-24 tips. I'm over it. Don't need the launching challenges...

Thanks for your help!
Jak,

Properly handled, most any of these boats can manage the Sound/Bay, but might not be much fun (wet) with family aboard if the conditions piped up. From your description, it sounds like the primary use would be in protected waters as opposed to out in the Sound or Buzzards Bay. That certainly opens the possibilities to any of the candidates folks have been describing here.

That said, where family sailing with young kids is involved, I tend to shy away from recommending boats that rely on hiking out. I look more for secure, protected cockpits, the deeper kind that will remain relatively dry and comfortable when the weather sours.

With their centerboards and low-aspect rudders, those catboats are ideally suited for the shallow bays in and around Cape Cod (that's what they were designed for). Their inherent form stability means they do not require hiking out when going to weather -- in fact they tend to sail relatively flat. Even if they may not point quite as high, these are nice attributes for relaxed family sailing.

The boats I linked too are usually made of fibreglass, with wood construction optional on some models. However, they do have some wood trim accents here and there. Compared to other daysailers of comparable length, these catboats would have more cockpit space, and more "heft". The heft along with a bit more freeboard would give them an advantage for forays into the Sound/Bay.

The same attributes (centerboard/rudder) that make them suited for shallow bays also make them easily trailered. And the shorter, unstayed spars are easy to manage too. However, the extra "heft" means they'll require a bit more manhandling at the ramp than some of the lighter trailer sailers.

Have you ever visited Arey's Pond Boatyard? Man, even if you're not interested in catboats, it's a great place to drop by and poke around. What a spot! Sounds like it's not far from you, either.

If you're hoping to do some competitive sailing, some of these other boats might be a better choice than a catboat (although there are some catboat races happening too). In that case, ask around, do some research to find out what sort of one-design boats are being used in your area. That might be the determining factor, or at least will give you a good idea of what works well in your vicinity....
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Last edited by JohnRPollard; 03-04-2010 at 08:52 AM.
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  #20  
Old 03-04-2010
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Given your initial post indicated some desire for speed, I'd recommend looking for a boat that will plane... meaning a dinghy. The Newports, Sanibels, Montgomerys, San Juans and Catalinas mentioned won't plane (but would be more seaworthy than a dinghy) .

But the planing daysailer choices are many. I bought a very nice O'Day Daysailer (trailer, engine, sails, the whole works) for under $1,000 and they're available all day long for under $2K. Not the fastest (though it does plane), but good crew accomodations, reasonably dry and great parts availability even for specimens from the 1960s (like mine).

Other planing boats that should trailer / daysail easily in the 16 - 20 foot range are:
- Buccaneer 18 (fast but tender)
- Paceship P17, P20, Mouette
- Interlake 18
- Highlander 20
- Rhodes 19 (swing or fixed keel)
- Catalina 16.5
- Hunter 170
- Flying Scot
- Thistle
- Lightening
A sail-away specimen of most of these can be found for $3500 and under... way under for some.

All these should have Class Associations where you can learn more about them.

Have fun... and do buy something just to get out on the water. If you wait for the "perfect deal" you'll miss a lot of sailing. Whatever you buy in this category you'll be able to resell for very close to what you paid.
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