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  #11  
Old 03-10-2010
stm stm is offline
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Surveyor says it's wet, and in some small areas some rot is detected. Surveyors says all boats of this vintage have some water intrusion, and this is not abnormal. To know for sure, rip up the deck. To do it right, and get cosmetically back to where it should be, cost prohibitive. Entire deck would need to be finished. Surveyor says ,chances are that the deck would not give me problems ,especially for coastal cruising. No problem with that. Problem lies with when I am ready to sell and all surveyors are going to point thumbs down because the moisture never leaves. Still waiting for a definitive answer.
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  #12  
Old 03-10-2010
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You're going to be waiting a long time...there are no DEFINITIVE ANSWERS when it comes to boats.
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Originally Posted by stm View Post
Surveyor says it's wet, and in some small areas some rot is detected. Surveyors says all boats of this vintage have some water intrusion, and this is not abnormal. To know for sure, rip up the deck. To do it right, and get cosmetically back to where it should be, cost prohibitive. Entire deck would need to be finished. Surveyor says ,chances are that the deck would not give me problems ,especially for coastal cruising. No problem with that. Problem lies with when I am ready to sell and all surveyors are going to point thumbs down because the moisture never leaves. Still waiting for a definitive answer.
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  #13  
Old 03-10-2010
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I would appreciate some examples of surveyors held accountable for poor professional judgment regarding wet or leaking decks. Published appellate decisions would be especially helpful.
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Old 03-10-2010
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I would much appreciate example of surveyors held accountable for poor judgment regarding wet or leaking decks. Published appellate decisions would be especially helpful.
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Old 03-10-2010
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It's highly unlikely that you will find a boat of the vintage under discussion without some wet core. Its a questions of degree. I agree that for coastal or Great Lakes cruising a few areas of wet core will not pose a threat to vessel or crew but it will definetly have a negative effect on value when you go to sell the boat. Any prospective purchaser will have the same qualms that you are having right now and will expect a price reduction. . My advice ... if its not so bad that its a structural issue, get the price reduced by an amount close to the cost of a recore job and go sailing. If the seller is too unrealistic to realize the situation ... move on to your next prospect.
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  #16  
Old 03-10-2010
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Sailing Dog recommended the Maine Sail article on moisture meters. I believe that article puts far too much faith in these meters and suggest you balance that out by reading my less optimistic article ...
moisture meter mythology

I have had the benefit of using these meters on over 2,000 boats and do not completely trust them. I have also had the opportunity to measure boat structure moisture content on a couple of hundred boats before and after that structure was opened up. After these many experiences I would never put my faith in a meter reading alone.
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Old 03-10-2010
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Of course, surveyors have a vested interest in having consumers not learn to do as much as possible for themselves.
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Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
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Old 03-10-2010
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Quote:
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Of course, surveyors have a vested interest in having consumers not learn to do as much as possible for themselves.
There is no vested interest in this situation, the consumer is going to have to hire me anyway (if they want insurance).The point of my article was to educate the consumer. Now I will gladly argue the veracity of the position stated in my article, otherwise I will ignore accusatory postings.
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  #19  
Old 03-10-2010
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SPC, you obviously are a lawyer (same here). I wouldn't freak out about the moisture meter readings. I agree, they are more voodoo than science. They seem to be good for measuring relativity between two spots or two boats, but I'm not at all convinced that they offer anything useful in terms of absolute numbers (i.e., whether the core in fact is wet or damaged). I had a yard guy, whom I trust, tell me that my hull on my last boat was wet, which freaked me out. We took a couple of core samples, and they were bone BONE dry. Sawdust!

As others have said, you are highly unlikely to find a 25 year old boat that won't have some moisture in the deck core, and I'm not convinced that it would affect your resale value 5 years from now. Anyone seriously considering a 30 year old boat has to expect some deck moisture.

An option for you is to take a couple of core samples from the deck to see what you've got. You may ask the seller to pay and/or split the cost, but even if you have to pay for it on your own it shouldn't be that expensive if the sample can be taken from an inconspicuous spot, particularly if it can be done from the interior behind some cabinetry without penetrating the outer skin.

What kind of boat?
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  #20  
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If the core is wet, it's not going to get better with time.

How do you get a crack at an anchor cleat? Were the holes drilled too big? No backing plate? Was the boat being towed in bad conditions and the tow rope snatched up? Is the core exposed at the holes? Shouldn't the core have been deleted around the cleat?

How do you know that was the only source of the water intrusion?

If my deck had wet core, I'd get it fixed. What does it say about the owner of a "beyond excellent" boat that he didn't have the wet deck fixed? It's not rocket science.

If this boat is beyond excellent, and you're going to pay a premium, then the boat should really be "beyond excellent", not just cosmetically, but structurally as well.

It would really help to know what kind of boat you're dealing with, Hinckley or Hunter. If it's a $25,000 boat and the fix is $8,000, then it not going to get fixed. If it's a $250,000 boat, an $8,000 fix is worth doing.
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