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-   -   S2 36 foot 1980 Help (http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/6453-s2-36-foot-1980-help.html)

Booher 03-08-2003 03:59 PM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
I found a 1980, 36 foot S2 for a great price that has been setting on the hard for two years and the price is right. No one is interested in it for some reason. It has been surveyed in the past year and seems to be structurally sound. Not sure about the engine? It is well under BUC. I really like it and think it could be my retirement boat. Can you tell me if I should put the money into it to fix it up. It''s what the marina calls a ''plain vanilla boat'' and needs just about everything.

ssnfld 03-09-2003 12:28 AM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
Sounds like a good boat to me! If the boat surveys well, the engine checks out, and it is under market value, on resale you will probably recover most of your investment.
Boat purchases are "love, Lust" after the above. You like the boat, S2 has a pretty decent reputation. Take your plain Jane, tart her up a bit and enjoy.
Jim

HHJ 03-09-2003 07:32 AM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
S2 made a really fine quality boat. I''m completely unprejudiced, just because I own a 28'' S2 doesn''t mean a thing, really.

All kidding aside, if you have a good survey and a good price, you''ve found a great boat -grab it. Then join the S2 list here at sailnet ("Join E-Mail Lists" at the left) for all the advice, support and information you''ll ever need.

Hans
8.5A Hesper

paulk 03-10-2003 03:21 AM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
S2''s do seem to be generally well put-together. I''ve always been impressed by the lack of or low incidence of nicks, dings or crazing in the decks of most of the S2''s I''ve seen.

sailingfool 03-10-2003 06:35 AM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
Booher,
I would encourage you to make a careful and detailed estimate of what the costs of "needs everything.." could be! First you need to confirm that the engine is solid, and understand that any work quoted by a yard ends up costing at least twice as much as what they might estimate.
We are finishing the upgrading of a quality but "needs everything" boat - although we are very happy with what we have, it would have been MUCH less expensive to have paid a premium for a mint boat that "needs nothing...". Recognize that the total costs of replacement and repairs of a neglected boat can easily far exceed the market value of the result (think why moderately damaged cars get trashed as totalled) - which is why you see boats asking well below book value - even if free, they might be no bargain. The owner KNOWS what repairs needs to be done, and is probably asking a number that if gets he will be delighted to have - because he doesn''t think the boat is worth more than that!
Mint boat at a premium price - go fo it. Way below book but needs fixing-up - CAVEAT EMPTOR.

hamiam 03-10-2003 12:06 PM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
Boats left on the hard for two years tend to need ALOT of repairs that can be both annoying and costly. Just make sure that the sum of the purchase price + all the repairs/replacements still equals a fair value. I bought a boat that was unused for several seasons and it has proven to be nightmare getting it up to spec. Good luck. And, by all means, make an offer several thousand below asking price.


Thermal 03-11-2003 06:56 PM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
I recently bought a 1980 36'' S2 (11 meter), and have been happy with it. For the most part, it''s really well built, and S2 put in the effort to do it right, except for a few things that are really poor - like really cheap plastic portlights and 1/8" lexan for some realtively large windows. This mixture of good and bad is baffling. Because my boat was well maintained and had almost all the extra "stuff" I was looking for, I paid more than the going rate for these boats, but it didn''t take much math to figure out that I was coming out way ahead. Boat stuff is really expensive - any savings in the initial purchase price will quickly disappear into the pockets of Sailnet, West Marine.... Best to do some of your own math, and DON''T guess or generalize your "estimates" will probably be way off.

JWag 03-12-2003 05:15 PM

S2 36 foot 1980 Help
 
Booher:

We were in the same position as you 3 years ago. We knew the boat that we wanted and found one that had been on the hard uncovered in the northeast for two years. The boat had been well maintained when it was in use, so the interior had few issues, but the lack of protection and maintenance in only 2 years generated the following list of repairs:

-needed to replace all running rigging as they were stiff and filthy.

-needed to replace cockpit compass.

-needed to replace various graphic striping.

-needed to replace various plumbing system components, including hot water tank, due to inability for antifreeze to be effective for 2 years. Still have a plumbing system leak somewhere.

-developed clogged drains at lazarette hatches, causing rain water to overflow into compartment and rot out sections of aft stateroom bulkhead.

-also, above moisture in lazarette rusted out battery charger

-needless to say, batteries were not salvageable and had to be replaced.

-needed to replace bilge pumps (see winterizing).

-developed leak in companionway hatch that rotted portion of headliner.

-other stuff I''m not remembering at the moment.

In spite of this, the underlying boat was good and after doing the above and applying much elbow grease reconditioning gelcoat and teak, we have a great boat. Thank goodness the diesel checked out fine, or else we would have walked. We did, however, spend $10,000 for materials and equipment (I did much of the labor myself). We bought the boat for about $20,000 under market, so it probably worked out. Our original offer was $10,000 below market and the survey results yielded another $10,000 adjustment on top of that. The survey was critical to be able to negotiate that additional reduction, especially since the owner started out listing the boat at $25,000 above market (he hadn''t seen what had happened to it after he stopped using it).

The formula can work, but be very conservative on what you think you will put in to it, get a good survey, rigging inspection and mechanical inspection (you''ll probably pay about $1,200 for all three, but it will be worth it), and be realistic about the time you will spend bringing it up to condition. Good luck.


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