Singlehandling a Beneteau 40? - SailNet Community

   Search Sailnet:

 forums  store  


Quick Menu
Forums           
Articles          
Galleries        
Boat Reviews  
Classifieds     
Search SailNet 
Boat Search (new)

Shop the
SailNet Store
Anchor Locker
Boatbuilding & Repair
Charts
Clothing
Electrical
Electronics
Engine
Hatches and Portlights
Interior And Galley
Maintenance
Marine Electronics
Navigation
Other Items
Plumbing and Pumps
Rigging
Safety
Sailing Hardware
Trailer & Watersports
Clearance Items

Advertise Here






Go Back   SailNet Community > On Board > Boat Review and Purchase Forum
 Not a Member? 


Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
  #1  
Old 08-18-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New York City
Posts: 24
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Gusnyc is on a distinguished road
Singlehandling a Beneteau 40?

Hi Everybody! This is my first posting in Salinet. I am new to the website and to the world of sailing. I am glad I found this place. It is a great source of information.

I've been looking to buy a Beneteau 40. I would like to have a boat that will allow me to sail during the weekends (mostly) and use it for vacations (1-2 weeks). I think the Benny 40 would work very well for that purpose.

What I don't really know is if it is possible to take her just for the evening. If that is the case, I would probably have to sail it by myself. Is that something doable with this particular boat?

Thank you very much for your answers/suggestions.

Gus
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #2  
Old 08-18-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
I would ask how much sailing experience you have? Single-handing a 40' boat is a bit of a big leap for someone without much experience, and repairs to a 40' boat get expensive.

BTW, if you're looking to sail mostly weekends, especially single-handed, it might make far more sense to get a smaller boat, and then charter for the 1-2 week vacations. The cost savings of getting a 30' boat would probably pay for the 1-2 weeks of chartering annually.
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #3  
Old 08-18-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,436
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
Most any boat can be single-handed, the question is just how much running around you need to do.

The Beneteau 40 would be a little better than older cruisers as all lines are lead to the companionway. Get the electric winch package and you'll never even break a sweat.

The run-around issue is that while the sheet winches are close to the wheels, the main sheets ends at the companion way. Adjusting the main sheet requires sliding from behind the wheel, to the front of the cockpit and then back to the wheel. Manageable but a bit of a pain...however this setup is quite typical of cruisers of this size and I dont think you'll find better.

h

The inmast main furling is not my personal taste, sailboats are slow enough without a handkerchief main.
__________________
Certified...in several regards...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #4  
Old 08-18-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New York City
Posts: 24
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Gusnyc is on a distinguished road
Thanks for the fast answers!

I have to confess that I have almost not experience, but I am not planning to single handle the boat at the beginning, 99% of the time I will be sailing with my other half (and our big dog). I am asking just in case I need to do that in the future (think about in a couple of years). I didn't phrase my question very well (sorry, English is not my first language).

The thing about the 40' is that it feels roomy and comfortable, comparing to a 30' or even a 34'. I know it is a big boat to start with, but I am not in a hurry to take it to the islands or do something crazy for a novice (BTW, I live in the NYC area). I just don't want to get a boat that I will have to change in a few years. I would prefer to get a boat that I can grow into and keep it for 10 or more years and still feel comfortable (even with a few guests onboard).

Gus
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #5  
Old 08-18-2010
DoctorK's Avatar
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Roanoke, VA
Posts: 20
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
DoctorK is on a distinguished road
Gus -

Good luck to you and your sailing adventures. Like I'm sure you've heard before and will see repeated over and over again on this forum, you should look into some sailing classes and read as much material on sailing as you can. You can never learn too much.
__________________
s/v QED Flicka 20
Smith Mountain Lake, VA
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #6  
Old 08-18-2010
Junior Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New York City
Posts: 24
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
Rep Power: 0
Gusnyc is on a distinguished road
Hi DoctorK!

Yes, definitely, I agree with you. I will start my ASA 101 instruction in a couple of weeks, followed by the 103. I am planning to do the 104 at the beginning of the next season. That is when I would be getting the Beneteau.

I am not the kind of guy who would jump into doing this without formal interaction/education. At the same time, I don't have a problem about practicing a lot before taking the boat relatively far from the dock, until I feel enough confidence. I just want to get the boat I like (or I fell in love I could say) and learn and grow with it.

What is your opinion? Do you think starting with the 40 could be dangerous or risky?

Gus
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #7  
Old 08-19-2010
Water Lover
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Location: New Mexico, USA (Heron, Elephant Butte lakes); Arizona (Lake Pleasant)
Posts: 691
Thanks: 3
Thanked 11 Times in 11 Posts
Rep Power: 5
rgscpat is on a distinguished road
other ideas

Is there a sailing co-op/club/school with discount rentals near you? A lot of these places will automatically enroll their sailing school graduates in a club that gives some sort of discount on rentals and charters. If the deal is good enough, that would mean you could come down and do short sails pretty easily, and try out several types of boats. And some of these places will organize group sails where several members split the cost of a day charter or of checking out a boat for a regatta.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #8  
Old 08-19-2010
Senior Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 1,370
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
Rep Power: 9
puddinlegs is on a distinguished road
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gusnyc View Post
Hi DoctorK!

Yes, definitely, I agree with you. I will start my ASA 101 instruction in a couple of weeks, followed by the 103. I am planning to do the 104 at the beginning of the next season. That is when I would be getting the Beneteau.

I am not the kind of guy who would jump into doing this without formal interaction/education. At the same time, I don't have a problem about practicing a lot before taking the boat relatively far from the dock, until I feel enough confidence. I just want to get the boat I like (or I fell in love I could say) and learn and grow with it.

What is your opinion? Do you think starting with the 40 could be dangerous or risky?

Gus
Well, it's tough to say. Keep a good eye on the weather taking care to manage your sail handling as you push your limits... like many other things, if taken step by step, by and large you should be fine. Docking by yourself on a 40' ft boat can be interesting, so be careful of the slip you choose for moorage. When choosing a slip, wind, current, etc... can work both for and against you depending on your local conditions. Other things to be careful of and can be tricky alone are manuevering in tight quarters, maintaining a good watch, etc... single handing is fun, but has it's own challenges. Take your time, give yourself extra room, and think through everything carefully before you do it including a 'plan B'. IMHO, sail handling systems, including a good reefing system, and a good autopilot are the critical part of comfortable single handing in larger sailboats. If those are in order, life is much easier. Good luck with the lessons and all... my only thought is how you came to your choice of boats having no experience. Nothing wrong with the boat you've chosen mind you, but it's a very large and expensive commitment without a baseline of experience to know what you really like.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #9  
Old 08-19-2010
sailingdog's Avatar
Telstar 28
 
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: New England
Posts: 43,291
Thanks: 0
Thanked 9 Times in 9 Posts
Rep Power: 13
sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice sailingdog is just really nice
Yes, starting with a 40' boat can be quite dangerous... the forces involved on a boat that large are considerable and can be lethal.

For instance, getting hit by the boom on a 16' sailing dinghy will hurt, but probably won't kill you in the case of an accidental gybe—getting hit by the boom on a 40' boat will likely kill you or put you in the hospital.

Another point is that the hardware and such on a 40' boat is just bigger all around, and that electric winches and windlasses do nothing for you when you're trying to haul the anchor out of the locker or bring the genoa up from the sail locker. Even the docklines, if they're sized properly, are going to be harder to handle.

Beth Leonard writes about such in her book, The Voyager's Handbook, 2nd edition, and clearly states how she felt starting on a smaller boat was advantageous, since mistakes were easier to recover from and the boat was more forgiving.

I would also highly recommend that your wife take at least an ASA 101 type course and learn enough to be able to singlehand whatever boat you get as well. There have been several well-documented tragedies where the husband was injured, lost overboard, or died, and the spouse, not having the skill or in some cases knowledge to handle the boat resulted in nearly losing it. If you were to fall overboard, if your wife doesn't know how to operate the boat, it isn't very likely that you'll be getting back aboard anytime soon.

Sailing as a couple often means that you're sailing as TWO PEOPLE SINGLEHANDING THE SAME BOAT...even on shorter sails, this can be the case. Getting a boat that is too big for one of you to singlehand is going to be a problem IMHO.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Gusnyc View Post
Hi DoctorK!

Yes, definitely, I agree with you. I will start my ASA 101 instruction in a couple of weeks, followed by the 103. I am planning to do the 104 at the beginning of the next season. That is when I would be getting the Beneteau.

I am not the kind of guy who would jump into doing this without formal interaction/education. At the same time, I don't have a problem about practicing a lot before taking the boat relatively far from the dock, until I feel enough confidence. I just want to get the boat I like (or I fell in love I could say) and learn and grow with it.

What is your opinion? Do you think starting with the 40 could be dangerous or risky?

Gus
__________________
Sailingdog

To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.

Telstar 28
New England

You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

If you're new to the Sailnet Forums... please read this
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
.

Still—DON'T READ THAT POST AGAIN.
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
  #10  
Old 08-19-2010
ASA and PSIA Instructor
 
Join Date: Apr 2000
Posts: 3,436
Thanks: 6
Thanked 17 Times in 17 Posts
Rep Power: 15
sailingfool will become famous soon enough
The formal education is a good base, but you need to get 20-30 days of sailing in a small boat, a Soling or Rhodes 19 or the like, so you can make mistakes and learn from them without having to deal with 20000 pounds. You will then be much more comfortable sailing the big boat, and will do that sailing more safely. Sailing a small boat IMHO is the only practical, safe way to develop a good experience base, although signing on as crew on a captained vessel for a month or two would work too...not too practical for most of us.
__________________
Certified...in several regards...
Reply With Quote Share with Facebook
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools

 
Posting Rules
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may post attachments
You may edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is On


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Beneteau 445 cla6665 Beneteau 4 08-18-2010 02:35 PM
Beneteau First 310 vs. Catalina 30 MKII MooreVOLS Boat Review and Purchase Forum 5 08-16-2010 01:46 PM


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:19 AM.

Add to My Yahoo!         
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
SEO by vBSEO 3.6.1
(c) Marine.com LLC 2000-2012

The SailNet.com store is owned and operated by a company independent of the SailNet.com forum. You are now leaving the SailNet forum. Click OK to continue or Cancel to return to the SailNet forum.