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  #1  
Old 01-27-2011
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Which boat is best for me?

Iam thinking of retiring and living on a sailboat yet to be purchased. I have a total budget of $100m to $200m to purchase and fit out the vessel. I would like to stay on the east coast with at least one Atlantic crossing, maybe more, I would like a boat in the 35 to 40ft range that is seaworthy and not too slow, and can be set up for single handed sailing. I have been looking at the Tartan 37 and 372' the Valiant 37 and 40' the Passport 37 and 40' the Pacific seacraft 34 and 37' the Pretorien 35' Bristol 35.5 , the Morgan 382, and would really appreciate some help comparing these boats and other suggestions. I like to sail and I am not looking for a dockside living space, that being said I will be living on the boat most of the time. I'd love to hear from anyone with experience sailing these boats, especially offshore. I must admit I am swimming with too much information and now need some realtime, experienced advice from someone who has lived the path I am about to embark upon. Thanks so much.
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Old 01-27-2011
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Umm, if you have a budget of $100-200m... you can buy pretty much anything out there... if your budget is $100k-200k, then you have to choose carefully.
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Old 01-27-2011
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Sorry, if you follow a number with one "m" it means thousands, like "k", if you follow a number with "mm" it means millions, but these are often misused. Any advice on the boats?
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Old 01-27-2011
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I'll take one of each then.
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Old 01-27-2011
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The Bristol 35.5, Tartan 37/372, the Pretorien and the Morgan were not purpose built bluewater boats AFAIK, but have been used for bluewater passages successfully. The Valiants, the Passports, the and the Pacific Seacrafts are purpose-built bluewater boats AFAIK.

Have you been aboard or sailed any of these boats? I would really recommend getting some time on some of these boats before you try to decide. The cabin layout, deck layout, stowage, etc., are all going to be different, and you need to find a boat that works for you.

Also, the size of the berths and headroom on the boats is important if you're going to be living aboard. Finding a boat that has berths that you can lie in comfortably is a necessity.

My recommendation is that you reserve about 15-20% of the total purchase budget for refitting, modifying and upgrading whatever boat you get.

I'd also recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you determine whether the boats you look at are even worth going forward on, saving you the price of a survey on boats that aren't worth looking at further.

While I've sailed on several of these boats, I haven't spent enough time on them to give you real feedback on their livability.

I would also ask if you're going to be living aboard by yourself or have others living/sailing with you?
Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphmacey View Post
Iam thinking of retiring and living on a sailboat yet to be purchased. I have a total budget of $100m to $200m to purchase and fit out the vessel. I would like to stay on the east coast with at least one Atlantic crossing, maybe more, I would like a boat in the 35 to 40ft range that is seaworthy and not too slow, and can be set up for single handed sailing. I have been looking at the Tartan 37 and 372' the Valiant 37 and 40' the Passport 37 and 40' the Pacific seacraft 34 and 37' the Pretorien 35' Bristol 35.5 , the Morgan 382, and would really appreciate some help comparing these boats and other suggestions. I like to sail and I am not looking for a dockside living space, that being said I will be living on the boat most of the time. I'd love to hear from anyone with experience sailing these boats, especially offshore. I must admit I am swimming with too much information and now need some realtime, experienced advice from someone who has lived the path I am about to embark upon. Thanks so much.
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Last edited by sailingdog; 01-27-2011 at 08:38 PM.
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Old 01-27-2011
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Mm

It would seem if you are using "M" to denote 1000 (from Roman Numerals) then MM would mean 2000. MM is used for some measurements (in energy & finance) but it's not common otherwise.

I think most people would agree "M" normally refers to a million, at least in normal usage and MM usually means millimeters or candy

K usually means 1000 (from kilo-)


Quote:
Originally Posted by ralphmacey View Post
Sorry, if you follow a number with one "m" it means thousands, like "k", if you follow a number with "mm" it means millions, but these are often misused. Any advice on the boats?
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Old 01-28-2011
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Sailingdog has it mostly right except from my personal experience you need more than 15-20% as a reserve. You need at least 20% after a refit unless you have a significant income.

You can find a very good boat for $100,000 and you should keep the rest in the bank, you will need it. Loose the engine or the mast and you will have a very big bill.

Phil
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Old 01-28-2011
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdbee View Post
It would seem if you are using "M" to denote 1000 (from Roman Numerals) then MM would mean 2000. MM is used for some measurements (in energy & finance) but it's not common otherwise.

I think most people would agree "M" normally refers to a million, at least in normal usage and MM usually means millimeters or candy

K usually means 1000 (from kilo-)
Also, coming from a tech background as I do... mb = megabyte, kb = kilobyte...
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You know what the first rule of sailing is? ...Love. You can learn all the math in the 'verse, but you take
a boat to the sea you don't love, she'll shake you off just as sure as the turning of the worlds. Love keeps
her going when she oughta fall down, tells you she's hurting 'fore she keens. Makes her a home.

—Cpt. Mal Reynolds, Serenity (edited)

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Old 01-28-2011
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So we are all correct in our own way, isnt diversity great, otherwise we would all own the same boat!
Regarding the boats, I would prefer to keep in the $100,000 range, with moderate speed and seakindlyness, for some reason a full keel with the large wetted surface and slow maneuvering challenges doesnt appeal to me, but I could be convinced otherwise (what do you think about a Shannon 38' ketch or sloop rigged). The other issue I ponder is the keel/centerboard design, is it good for offshore use? A Little Harbor 38 would fall into that choice. Is a skeg hung rudder the more common for offshore cruising or does a spade rudder seem more common? How to decide on the critical issues first?
I will be solo sailing much of the time, to make this simple, if I could choose only from two very different boats, say a Tartan 372 and a Pacific Seacraft 37', would the Tartan be a safe choice, even if it wasnt designed for blue water, or would it fall apart after several years of constant use, how much better built is a Pacific Seacraft, and is it worth the price?
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Old 01-28-2011
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As you've probably discovered, this is probably the largest segment of cruising boats and with your budget you have a lot of flexibility. It's easy to get overwhelmed. I agree that the best way to discover what you like is to start visiting boats (or better yet, test sailing them) to help determine what you like.

But before you do that, you need a good list of how you're going to use the boat...it seems like you've got a good start on that from your post, but really writing everything down and knowing what you want can help.

The blog Messing About in Sailboats had a good series on buying a used boat that we reprinted on North American Sailor (http://nasailor.com/2011/01/04/buyin...ing-the-deal/). I suggest checking it out - it lays out the process very methodically to help keep you from getting overwhelmed.

Another big factor will be the condition of the boat and the quality of its gear and condition...will you need to replace all the deck rigging, upgrade electronics, redo the decks, upgrade the engine, etc. Also, how much work are you willing to do yourself vs. outsource. All these things can make a huge difference in the amount of money you shell out.

Get on boats.com and find some boats in your area and then go out and visit them to see how they are laid out. You might also consider looking for a broker to help you narrow down your list.
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